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bell ringing in the news and views







News and Views



Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

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by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

Monastic Life

Prayer with the Monks

Monsignor Giussani and Secularism

Solemnity of the Birth of St. John the Baptist



Monastic Life
St. Bernard, the Abbot of Clairvaux, said of St. Benedict: “The most sweet name of St. Benedict ought to awaken in our hearts sentiments of gladness and respect, because it is the name of our guide, our master, and our lawgiver.”

Prayer Times with the Monks. Visitors welcome!
Monday-Friday
6:20 AM, Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM, Midday Prayer
5:15 PM, Community Eucharist
6:45 PM, Evening Prayer

Saturday
6:20 AM, Vigils and Morning Prayer
11:30 AM, Eucharist, and Midday Prayer
5:35 PM, Evening Prayer I for Sunday
6:45 PM, Vigils for Sunday
8-9 PM, Eucharistic Holy Hour

Sunday
7:00 AM, Morning Prayer
10:00 AM, Eucharist
12:05 PM, Midday Prayer
5:00 PM, Evening Prayer II for Sunday

In regions where monasteries exist, the vocation of these communities is to further the participation of the faithful in the Liturgy of the Hours and to provide necessary solitude for more intense personal prayer. -Catechism of the Catholic Church, #2691

The Benedictine monastery is above all a place of prayer, in the sense that everything in it is organized to make the monks attentive and responsive to the voice of the Spirit. -Pope John Paul II

If God Does Exist, He Doesn’t Matter

Excerpted from Luigi Giussani, The Religious Awareness of Modern Man, Communio 25, Spring 1998, pp. 114-115.

The term for this conception of life, insofar as it has through political power and public education become a social mindset, a dominant cultural influence, is “secularism.” Secularism is “the assertion that man belongs to himself and to no one else” (Cornelio Fabro); it is the presumption that man is totally autonomous.

Herein lies the cause of the terrible impasse confronting the religious awareness of human beings in our day. In fact, a God who is not relevant to our lives is at best a useless God. It follows that the more active, interested, and engaged with life a man is, the more he will feel it a waste of time to pause to think about such a God. God is reduced to a more or less private option, a pathetic psychological consolation, or a museum piece. For a man who feels keenly the brevity of his life and the many tasks to be accomplished, such a God is not only useless, but even harmful: He is the “opiate of the people.” A society informed by such a mindset may not be formally atheistic, but it is so de facto.

In truth, such a God is not only useless, not only harmful; he is not even God. A god who does not pertain to man’s activity, his constitution, his path toward destiny, is at best a waste of time; in the end, a god of this sort should be dispensed with, eliminated. The formula, “If God does exist, He doesn’t matter,” bears within itself the logical conclusion, “God does not exist.”

The real enemy of authentic religiosity, in my view, is not so much atheism as it is the secularism outlined above. If the sacred is irrelevant to the concrete domain of our daily efforts, then man’s relationship with God is conceivable only as something totally subjective. Consequently, human reality is left to itself. Our problems and concerns are then at the mercy of sheerly human criteria, which, in practice, are readily subsumed by the powers that be.

Solemnity of the Birth of Saint John the Baptist

June 24 is a huge Solemnity in the Church, the Birth of St. John the Baptist.St. Benedict had a devotion to him at Montecassino. The following Litany and prayer are taken from a website promoting Mental Prayer in the Carmelite tradiiton: http://floscarmelivitisflorigera.blogspot.com/2008/06/st-john-baptist-litany-and-prayer.html

St John the Baptist Litany and Prayer
Lord, have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, hear us. Christ, graciously hear us.
God the Father of Heaven, Have mercy on us.

God the Son, Redeemer of the world, Have mercy on us.
God, the Holy Ghost, Have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God, Have mercy on us.
Holy Mary, Pray for us.
Queen of Prophets, Pray for us.
Queen of Martyrs, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, precursor of Christ, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, glorious forerunner of the Sun of Justice, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, minister of Baptism to Jesus, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, burning and shining lamp of the world, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, angel of purity before thy birth, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, special friend and favorite of Christ, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, heavenly contemplative, whose element was prayer, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, intrepid preacher of truth, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, voice crying in the wilderness, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, miracle of mortification and penance, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, example of profound humility, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, glorious martyr of zeal for God’s holy law, Pray for us.
St. John the Baptist, gloriously fulfilling thy mission, Pray for us.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world, Spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world, Graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the world, Have mercy on us.
Christ, hear us. Christ, graciously hear us.
V. Pray for us, O glorious St. John the Baptist,
R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
Let Us Pray: O God, Who hast honored this world by the birth of Saint John the Baptist, grant that Thy faithful people may rejoice in the way of eternal salvation, through Jesus Christ Our Lord.

Amen.

Prayer to St. John the Baptist
O God, You raised up St. John the Baptist to prepare a perfect people for Christ. Fill Your people with the joy of possessing His grace, and direct the minds of all the faithful in the way of peace and salvation.
Grant that as St. John was martyred for truth and justice, so we may energetically profess our Faith in You, and lead others to the Way, the Truth, and Eternal Life.
Amen.

___________________________________________________
Human pride and egoism always create divisions, build walls of indifference, hate and violence. The Holy Spirit, on the other hand, makes hearts capable of understanding the languages of all, as he re-establishes the bridge of authentic communion between earth and heaven. The Holy Spirit is Love.
Pope Benedict XVI, Pentecost Homily, 2006







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

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by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

CL Way of the Cross

Today following the monk’s 3 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion we will have the Communion and Liberation way of the Cross around the campus of Benedictine College, beginning and ending in the Abbey Church. (The Way of the Cross will start at approximately 4 PM.) We will give some time following the Liturgy and before the Way of the Cross.

For information about other CL Ways of the Cross today in the United States, go to:
http://www.clonline.us/wayofthecross2008.cfm
http://www.wocbrooklynbridge.com/
There will also be a CL Way of the Cross in Wichita, KS. today From 12-1 PM at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.

Usually today would be the Feast of the Death of St. Benedict for the Benedictine Order (the Solemnity has been moved this year until April 1 because of Good Friday) How appropriate to look to St. Benedict who reminds us that by sharing in the sufferings of Christ, we might share in His Kingdom.

In St. Gregory the Great’s Life of St. Benedict, there is an interesting line toward the Beginning. St. Benedict, lost in contemplation as a hermit in the cave, did not even realize it was Easter. A priest brought him Easter dinner, and St. Benedict said "I know that it is Easter with me and a great feast, having found so much favor at God's hands as this day to enjoy your company.” For him the victory of Christ was present through this friend in front of him, the priest who made him Easter dinner. Throughout his Rule St. Benedict will recognize the nearness of Christ in the Abbot, the brothers, the elderly, the young, the sick, the guests, especially the poor, and in the work. He is there in each of our daily lives as He is present as the cross is taken into cities all across the United States, and throughout the world today. This hour of glory changes everything.

Easter Triduum with the Monks

Good Friday
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
3:00 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion
4:00 PM, Communion and Liberation Way of the Cross, beginning in Abbey Church, processing through the campus.
http://www.clonline.us/wayofthecross2008.cfm

http://www.wocbrooklynbridge.com/

Holy Saturday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Evening Prayer
8:30 PM Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday
7:00 AM Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

Father most holy,
look upon the blood flowing from the Saviour's pierced side;
look upon the blood shed by the many victims
of hatred, of war, of terrorism,
and in your mercy, grant that the course of world events
may unfold according to your will, in justice and in peace,
and that your Church may devote herself with quiet confidence
to your service and to the liberation of mankind.
-Pope John Paul II, Good Friday, 2003

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God was moved by our nothingness, by our betrayal, by our crude, forgetful and treacherous poverty, by our pettiness. For what reason? "I have loved you with an eternal love, therefore I have made you part of me, having pity on your nothingness." The beat of the heart is pity on your nothingness but the reason why is that you might participate in being.
Luigi Giussani, Founder of Communion and Liberation

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

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by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

* Mary, the Mother of God

* Prayers for Iraq

* Pope’s Message of peace, and the Family

* +Karen Charboneau, R.I.P.

* +Thomas (Tommy) Jay Doll, R.I.P.



Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God

January 1 is the Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God. It is a Holy Day of Obligation for Catholics. Mass at the Abbey on New Years day will be at 11:30 AM

With a hymn composed in the eighth or ninth century, thus for over a thousand years, the Church has greeted Mary, the Mother of God, as “Star of the Sea”: Ave maris stella. Human life is a journey. Towards what destination? How do we find the way? Life is like a voyage on the sea of history, often dark and stormy, a voyage in which we watch for the stars that indicate the route. The true stars of our life are the people who have lived good lives. They are lights of hope. Certainly, Jesus Christ is the true light, the sun that has risen above all the shadows of history. But to reach him we also need lights close by—people who shine with his light and so guide us along our way. Who more than Mary could be a star of hope for us? With her “yes” she opened the door of our world to God himself; she became the living Ark of the Covenant, in whom God took flesh, became one of us, and pitched his tent among us (cf. Jn 1:14). Pope Benedict XVI, Spe Salvi #49

Greetings from Iraq
Captain Brian Carr, (BC, ‘03) called this morning from Mosul, Iraq to wish the monks and people at the college a Happy New Year. I assured Brian of our prayers for himself, and all the troops in Iraq, as we celebrate a New Year.

Pope’s Message for World Day of Prayer
The first paragraph of the Pope’s message for the World Day of Prayer, January 1, 2008, carries over the theme of our celebration this past weekend of the Holy Family. He reminds us of the need to pray for and work for the strengthening of the family.

At the beginning of a New Year, I wish to send my fervent good wishes for peace, together with a heartfelt message of hope to men and women throughout the world. I do so by offering for our common reflection the theme which I have placed at the beginning of this message. It is one which I consider particularly important: the human family, a community of peace. The first form of communion between persons is that born of the love of a man and a woman who decide to enter a stable union in order to build together a new family. But the peoples of the earth, too, are called to build relationships of solidarity and cooperation among themselves, as befits members of the one human family: “All peoples”—as the Second Vatican Council declared—“are one community and have one origin, because God caused the whole human race to dwell on the face of the earth (cf. Acts 17:26); they also have one final end, God” (Nostra Aetate)

+Father Marion’s sister-in-law
Father Marion Charboneau, OSB, the Chaplain at Maur Hill Mount Academy just learned of the death of his sister-in-law, Karen Charboneau, Howell, Mi. Please remember the repose of the soul of Karen in your prayers, and the consolation of her husband, Mike Charboneau.

+Thomas Jay Doll 1957 – 2007, my first cousin
MEEKER, Colo. — Thomas Jay Doll passed away suddenly in Meeker on Dec. 23. He was born Feb. 6, 1957, in Great Bend, the son of Gerald and Rita Miller Doll, and was a longtime resident of the Claflin area.

Tom was inducted into the Fort Hays State University Hall of Fame on Oct. 24, 1992, for the following honors: Honorable mention Little All-American running back in 1975; Honorable mention National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics All-American in 1975 and 1978. First-team All-Central States Intercollegiate Conference 1978. Second-team All-Central States Intercollegiate Conference in 1976. NAIA All-District 10 selection in 1975. He still holds seven of the nine FHSU rushing records, including marks for yards in a season (1,536 in 1978) and career (4,477, in 1975-1978).

Tom married Janet Whitfield on June 6, 1987, in Plano, Ill. Tom worked in the carpentry field until 1989, when he went to work for ANR Pipeline in Sandwich, Ill. In August 2000 Tom moved his family to Meeker, Colo., where he took a position with American Soda. He went to work for Shell Oil Company in 2004.

Survivors include his wife of 20 years, Janet; his son, Jared, and daughter, Kathryn, of Meeker; his mother, Rita Doll of Claflin; his brother, Craig, and his wife Annie Doll, and nephews Hagan and Dillon, of Norman, Okla.; a sister, Anita Taylor, and a niece, Erin Taylor, of Tucson, Ariz.; a brother, Barry Doll and wife Laurie, nieces Hannah, Maggie and Kelsey and nephew Luke, of Salina; and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. He was preceded in death by his beloved father, Gerald Doll, in 1981.> The funeral Mass will be held at 10:30 a.m. Thursday January 3 at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Claflin, KS.

From the Catechism, #525: Jesus was born in a humble stable, into a poor family. Simple shepherds were the first witnesses to this event. In this poverty heaven's glory was made manifest. The Church never tires of singing the glory of this night:
“The Virgin today brings into the world the Eternal
And the earth offers a cave to the Inaccessible.
The angels and shepherds praise him
And the magi advance with the star,
For you are born for us,
Little Child, God eternal!”
Kontakion of Romanos the Melodist.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu









News and Views



by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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* Christmas

* Tommy Doll, R.I.P.

* Fr. Joseph Bahr, R.I.P.



Tuesday, 25 December, Christmas Day at the Abbey

7:00 AM
Morning Prayer
10:00 AM
Mass of Christmas Day
12:05 PM
Midday Prayer
5:00 PM
Second Vespers of Christmas

In the stable at Bethlehem, Heaven and Earth meet. Heaven has come down to Earth. For this reason, a light shines from the stable for all times; for this reason joy is enkindled there; for this reason song is born there. At the end of our Christmas meditation I should like to quote a remarkable passage from Saint Augustine. Interpreting the invocation in the Lord's Prayer: "Our Father who art in Heaven", he asks: what is this - Heaven? And where is Heaven? Then comes a surprising response: "... who art in Heaven - that means: in the saints and in the just.
-Pope Benedict XVI, Midnight Mass, 2007

Recent Deaths

+Tommy Doll

My first cousin, Tommy Doll, 50, died of a heart attack yesterday (Sunday). He was living in Meeker, Co. IN the 1970s Tommy played football for Ft. Hays State and is one of three players in the history of that school to rush for over 3000 yards (One of the others is my second cousin Jordan Hickel)

Tommy’s father Gerald died of a heart attack a number of years ago. His mother Rita (my dad’s sister) is a devout Catholic, and often came to visit the Abbey with my parents. His cousin Kirk Doll had been a linebackers coach for Notre Dame under Lou Holtz, then at LSU, and finally for the Denver Broncos.

Please remember the repose of Tommy in your prayers.

+Father Joseph Bahr’s Death

Father Joseph Bahr, 73, a priest of the Diocese of Dodge City, and Pastor of St. Dominic’s Catholic Church, Garden City, and St. Stanislaus Catholic Church, Ingalls, Ks, died yesterday, December 19, of an apparent heart attack. He had been a priest for 47 years, and pastor of St. Dominic’s since 1999.

The Mass of Christian Burial will be at St. Ann’s Catholic Church, Olmitz, Ks, at 10:30 AM on Wednesday, December 26.

From the Catechism, #525: Jesus was born in a humble stable, into a poor family. Simple shepherds were the first witnesses to this event. In this poverty heaven's glory was made manifest. The Church never tires of singing the glory of this night:

“The Virgin today brings into the world the Eternal
And the earth offers a cave to the Inaccessible.
The angels and shepherds praise him
And the magi advance with the star,
For you are born for us,
Little Child, God eternal!”
Kontakion of Romanos the Melodist.

_
Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu









bell ringing in the news and views

News and Views



by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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Bella: Opens today!!!
How the founder of our Abbey Encountered Christ
See Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, Live!

Finally a Movie that gets it right!
(CNA).- “Bella,” to be released today, October 26, has captured the hearts of audiences all over the country. Hollywood Reporter describes the movie as a “romantic drama [that] stars Emmy winner Tammy Blanchard as a young single waitress fired from her job right after discovering that she is pregnant. The restaurant's empathetic chef (Mexican star Eduardo Verastegui) follows her around New York for a day, developing a bond that helps each discover truths about themselves and each other.”

"The film is a crowd-pleaser about humanity, family, friendship and the unique magic of New York City," Roadside co-president Eric d'Arbeloff said. " 'Bella' will win the hearts and minds of Latino and mainstream audiences alike, and we hope it finds the same success as previous Toronto People's Choice Award winners 'Life Is Beautiful,' 'Whale Rider,' 'Hotel Rwanda,' 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon' and 'American Beauty.' "

Roadside co-president Howard Cohen added, "Eduardo Verastegui gives a star-making turn that has gotten the attention of a whole new audience."

Verastegui is one of the most successful Mexican actors in Hollywood today, has become one of the strongest voices against the legalization of abortion in Mexico City.

Since rediscovering the faith of his parents, he has no fear of public rejection for denouncing the holocaust of abortion. Verastegui has revealed his pro-life convictions to various Mexican media outlets and has created an organization in California to help those in need, especially women who are seeking abortions.

How the Founder of our Abbey Encountered Christ
The following is an account from the diary Father Henry Lemcke, OSB. It recounts how, as a Lutheran Seminarian, in Germany he became unsatisfied with the rationalism of his day. He would eventually go to Regensberg to be ordained as a Roman Catholic priest under the famed Bishop Johann Michael Sailer on April 11, 1826.
The more I imbedded myself in the writing of Stolberg, the more clear it became to me that it was most certainly not a foolish idea to have Christ as the focal point of the world’s history -- for everything that happened before Him, and everything that took place after Him shows this relationship to Christ. Thus I was able to see how our so-called “Learned Professors” with their “practical history of the church” were operating entirely from the wrong standpoint when they suggested that Christ was merely the founder of a new religion.
Father Henry Lemcke, OSB, Founder of St. Benedict’s Abbey

Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, Live!
This coming Monday, October 29, 2007 Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, will be speaking at Benedictine College.

4:00 PM, O’Malley McAllister Auditorium. Springtime of Faith. The regular price for tickets at the door is $15. Please register by calling Dona Domann at 913-360-7699, e-mail Donna at ddomann@benedictine.edu , or show up at the door.

5:15 PM, Mass Abbey Church. This is the usual Abbey weekday Mass. Visitors are welcome!

6:30 PM, O’Malley McAllister Auditorium, Free talk open to the public, New Directions in Psychology, the Positive Psychology of Dr. Martin Seligman. (Dr. Seligman works on positive psychology, learned helplessness, depression, and on optimism and pessimism. He is currently Fox Leadership Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. He is well known in academic and clinical circles and is a best-selling author.)

8:00 PM, Mass, Our Lady of Guadalupe Chapel, Abbey Church: Father Brendan, celebrant; Father Benedict, Homilist.

Following Mass: Book signing with Father Benedict.

The 8 PM Mass in the Abbey Church, Guadalupe Chapel, will take the place of the 9:30 PM student Mass on Monday.
The New York Times had a good story about Father Benedict last March 25, 2007.
(which was 11 years to the day since Father Benedict’s first visit to Benedictine College on March 25, 1996, the Feast of the Annunciation.) http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/25/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/25WEpeople.html

___________________________________________________
"Being Christian is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction. Saint John's Gospel describes that event in these words: “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should ... have eternal life” (3:16)."
-Pope Benedict XVI, Deus Caritas Est, #1

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, at BC
Mission week at BC
Pope Benedict XVI on Monks
Responsorial Psalms
What Vocation Crisis?
Pope Pius VII, Last of the Benedictine Popes

Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR at BC
Please promote this event among your friends, with family members, in your parish, and with any Catholic groups you know. Even students who are admitted free should register as soon as possible so we have an accurate count. See the information below on how to do that.

Fr. Groeschel Live! Meet the famous priest, Father Benedict J. Groeschel, CFR, seen by millions of viewers each week on “Sunday Night: Live with Fr. Benedict Groeschel,” as he leads an evening spiritual conference at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, October 29, 4 p.m. The conference, ""Springtime of Faith,"" features an early bird ticket price of $10 if purchased before October 10. The regular price for tickets at the door is $15.00. BC students are free with ID. Register by calling Dona Domann at 913-360-7699, or e-mail her at ddomann@benedictine.edu

Fr. Benedict J. Groeschel, CFR, is the Director of the Office for Spiritual Development of the Archdiocese of New York. He founded and is on the staff of Trinity Retreat, a center for prayer and study for the clergy. John Cardinal O’Connor appointed him promoter of the cause of Canonization of the Servant of God Terence Cardinal Cooke in 1984.

His most recent books are: The Virtue Driven Life (Our Sunday Visitor, 2007) A Drama of Reform (Ignatius Press, 2005) Why Do We Believe (Our Sunday Visitor, 2005) When Did We See You Lord (Our Sunday Visitor, 2005).

Mission Week at BC
Sharing in Christ’s Passion so as to share in His Glory!!!
Sunday, Sept. 16
5:30pm Sunday Kick-off Mass* Abbey Church
7:30pm Sunday Kick-off Mass* Abbey Church
*Introduction of the Apostles of the Interior Life & Spiritual Direction Sign-Ups

Monday, Sept. 17
All Day Personal Spiritual Direction (Emmaus Walks), Sign-ups at O'Malley-McAlister Auditorium 8:15pm Mission Meditation & Small Groups, O'Malley-McAlister Auditorium Evening "Can Do"- Non perishable food drive.
Call Emily: 309-532-0809

Tuesday, Sept. 18
All Day Personal Spiritual Direction (Emmaus Walks), Sign-ups at O'Malley-McAlister Auditorium 8:15pm Mission Meditation & Small Groups, O'Malley-McAlister Auditorium

Wednesday, Sept. 19
All Day Personal Spiritual Direction (Emmaus Walks), Sign-ups at O'Malley-McAlister Auditorium 8:15pm Mission Meditation & "Rag Man" Skit, O'Malley-McAlister Auditorium

Thursday, Sept. 20
All Day Personal Spiritual Direction (Emmaus Walks), Sign-ups at O'Malley-McAlister Auditorium 8:15pm Final Mission Meditation & Small Groups, O'Malley-McAlister Auditorium

Friday, Sept. 21
All Day "Solidarity with the Hungry," Rice meals and sleep outside tonight.
Guys Call Jaeger: 913-484-4244
Gals Call Claire: 314-520-7745
8pm Rave N Worship and "Invisible Children" documentary, Abbey Crypt

Saturday, Sept. 22
7:45am Commissioning Mass for Volunteers, Guadalupe Chapel
All Day Fall Service Day, More than 8 service projects to choose from! Call Kelly: 402-598-6457
Sign-Ups in the Cafe, Ministry Office, or with your RA
All Day Holy Hours, Pray for volunteers and those being served, St. Martin's Chapel
Evening BBQ sponsored by Res LIfe followed by concert at Holy Grounds

All Week
"Quarter Drive"- Raise money to buy food for the poor. Call Joey: 720-289-1147
"Supply Drive"- Donate supplies for local kids and moms. Call Danielle: 913-360-0399
"Luggage for Belize"- Give office supplies to mission school. Call Amber: 507-360-8719
"Milk Money"- Tips at Holy Grounds buy elementary kids milk. Call Sarah: 913-548-9768

BC Ministry Office, SU, 913-360-7568
Service Info: ravenservice@gmail.com
Spiritual Direction Info: bcministry@benedictine.edu
U.I.O.G.D.
Ut in Omnibus Glorificetur Deus
That in all things God may be glorified.

Pope Benedict XVI on Monastic Prayer
In the life of monks, however, prayer takes on a particular importance: it is the heart of their calling. Their vocation is to be men of prayer. In the patristic period the monastic life was likened to the life of the angels. It was considered the essential mark of the angels that they are worshippers. Their very life is worship. This should hold true also for monks. Monks pray first and foremost not for any specific intention, but simply because God is worthy of being praised. "Confitemini Domino, quoniam bonus! -- Praise the Lord, for he is good, for his mercy is eternal!": so we are urged by a number of Psalms (e.g. Ps 106:1). Such prayer for its own sake, intended as pure divine service, is rightly called officium. It is "service" par excellence, the "sacred service" of monks. It is offered to the triune God who, above all else, is worthy "to receive glory, honour and power" (Rev 4:11), because he wondrously created the world and even more wondrously redeemed it.

Responsorial Psalms
I wanted to let you know about an exciting Musica Sacra project being offered COMPLETELY FREE of CHARGE to Catholic musicians.
They are settings of the Responsorial Psalms with psalm tones based on Gregorian chant.
http://chabanelpsalms.org/

"…may your art help to affirm that true beauty which, as a glimmer of the Spirit of God, will transfigure matter, opening the human soul to the sense of the eternal."
--Letter of His holiness Pope John Paul II to artists, 1999, Copyright Libreria Editrice Vaticana

What Vocational Crisis?
3,200 Youth Show Readiness to Follow Call
LORETO, Italy, SEPT. 4, 2007 (Zenit.org ).- When the leaders of a Loreto youth rally made a vocations call, some 2,000 men and 1,200 women stood up to show their readiness to become priests or consecrated persons.

Monday's rally gathered about 100,000 youth from the Neocatechumenal Way, as a follow-up to the visit from Benedict XVI, who had been with the youth the two days before.

Archbishop Stanislaw Rylko, president of the Pontifical Council for the Laity, presided over the meeting, accompanied by several other bishops. The rally was animated by the founders of the Neocatechumenal Way, Kiko Argüello and Carmen Hernández, along with Father Mario Pezzi.

A Neocatechumenate communiqué explained that since Pope John Paul II's 1984 meeting with youth in Rome, the movement has called together its young people for a vocation meeting, in order to harvest the fruits from the encounters with the Holy Father.

The meeting on Monday included a procession of about 1,000 priests and a reading of the Gospel.

Archbishop Rylko commented on the Gospel reading, saying: "The Holy Father wants to convey a message to all young people, that being a Christian is beautiful."

Cardinal George Pell of Sydney was inspired by the rally and invited the youth to engage in a similar preparation for World Youth Day, to be held in Australia next July.

Pope Pius VII, the last Benedictine Pope
The last Benedictine Pope, Pope Pius VII, (second to the last if we count the Camaldolese Benedictine, Pope Gregory XVI) served as Supreme Pontiff from 1800-1823. During those years our Lord used him greatly in the spread of the Gospel, and the Roman Catholic faith.> After suffering exile, Pope Pius VII in thanksgiving for his freedom extended the Feast of Our Lady of Sorrows (or the Seven Sorrows of Mary) to the entire Church. The Feast will be celebrated this coming Saturday.
When Pope Pius VII was elected in 1800, the United States had one Catholic Diocese, Baltimore. By the time of his death in 1823, Pope Pius VII had created, in addition to the Archdiocese of Baltimore, the newly formed Dioceses of: Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Bardstown, Charleston, Richmond, and Cincinnati.
Pope Pius VII changed the colors of the Vatican flag to their current colors.

The Development Director for our Abbey, Dan Madden, while writing for the Tower Topics of Conception Abbey in the Spring of 2005, noted that there have been 24 Benedictine Popes through the ages.

___________________________________________________
Indeed, St. Basil created a very special monasticism: it was not closed to the community of the local Church but instead was open to it. His monks belonged to the particular Church; they were her life-giving nucleus and, going before the other faithful in the following of Christ and not only in faith, showed a strong attachment to him - love for him - especially through charitable acts. These monks, who ran schools and hospitals, were at the service of the poor and thus demonstrated the integrity of Christian life.
-Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, July 4, 2007

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Alan G. Boesch, R.I.P.
3:59 at 7:00 PM this evening
Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR
Steve Tasker (Today’s Rochester
Democrat and Chronicle)
Monastic Life

+Alan G. Boesch 53, Hastings, died Sunday, 9/2/07. Born in Norfolk.
Survivors: wife Lynn Boesch of Hastings; Daughter Jessica Parks of Lincoln, Sons Ryan Boesch and Brandon Boesch (Benedictine College Freshman), both of Hastings. One grandson; mother Dolores Boesch of Humphrey; sisters Sharon Reiner of Shepherd, MT and Rena Branecki of Omaha; brothers Dale Boesch of Humphrey, Craig Boesch of Lincoln; 24 Nieces & Nephews.

Rosary: Thursday, 9/6/07, 7:30 p.m. and Mass of Christian Burial Friday, 9/7/07, 10 a.m. both at St. Michael's Catholic Church. Burial Friday, 9/7/07, 4 p.m. in St. Francis Cemetery, Humphrey, Nebraska. Visitation: Wednesday, 9/5/07, 1 p.m.- 9p.m. & Thursday, 9/6/07, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the funeral home & Friday, 9/7/07 1 hr. prior to service at the church. Memorials to Hastings Catholic Schools Matching Teachers Fund or Catholic Social Services. Livingston-Butler-Volland Funeral Home & Cremation Center is in charge of arrangements.

Published in the Lincoln Journal Star on 9/5/2007.
3:59 at 7:00 PM
Thursday, September 6
Ferrell Tower Classroom at BC
7:00 PM
Tonight we will present
Sergei Rachmaninov, Piano Concerto No. 2
A new group, “3:59”, will have its first gathering this evening at 7 PM in the Tower classroom of Ferrell Hall here at BC. The group, part of Communion and Liberation University (CLU) here at BC remembers that:

It was 4 PM when John and Andrew encountered Christ, the Savior they had been waiting for with great expectation. To recognize Christ as the answer to our humanity, we first must take our human need seriously. “What are you looking for?” This is the question we take seriously in 3:59, because this is the question that fosters a sensitivity to our hearts and enables us, every time we meet Christ, to exclaim, “It’s really Him!! It’s the one who make life new again.”

Fr. Benedict Groeschel , CFR
Monday, October 29, 4:00 PM
O’Malley-Mcalister Auditorium
(Everyone, including students, who wants to attend this talk needs to reserve a seat. See the information below on how to register.) Fr. Groeschel Live! Meet the famous priest, Father Benedict J. Groeschel, CFR, seen by millions of viewers each week on “Sunday Night: Live with Fr. Benedict Groeschel,” as he leads an evening spiritual conference at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, October 29, 4 p.m. The conference, ""Springtime of Faith,"" features an early bird ticket price of $10 if purchased before October 10. The regular price for tickets at the door is $15.00. BC students are free with ID. Register by calling Dona Domann at 913-360-7699. (ext. 7699 if calling from a campus phone)

Tasker honored to join Bills Wall
The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
Sal Maiorana
Staff writer

(September 6, 2007) — ORCHARD PARK — Steve Tasker won four AFC championships and played in four Super Bowls and seven Pro Bowls during his time with the Buffalo Bills, but strictly on a personal level, none of that means quite as much as what will take place Sunday afternoon at Ralph Wilson Stadium.

"This is the greatest thing that's ever happened to me in my football career," Tasker said Wednesday of his induction into the Bills Wall of Fame which will occur at halftime of the season opener against Denver.

Tasker becomes the 24th member (23 men and the 12th man) to have his name affixed to the façade at the stadium where he played for 11 1Ž2years.
"When Mr. Wilson gave me the call and told me I was selected, I called my family — I was out of the house — and told them and nothing that's ever happened to me or my family got the reaction that that did from my family,'' he said.

Tasker is the eighth member of the Super Bowl era Bills to earn the distinction, and he said that everyone who preceded him — Marv Levy, Jim Kelly, Kent Hull, Andre Reed, Thurman Thomas, Darryl Talley and Jim Ritcher are the others — relishes the honor.

"A number of former teammates are on the wall and we all came to the same conclusion — that building is really special to all of us who played there," said Tasker.

"It was a magical time, a magical team and a magical town. To have your name put up on the wall of that stadium, in the estimation of me and my teammates, is very special. It's a special place for the players who played there and a special place for the fans to go and cheer. To have my name go up there, it just doesn't get any better for all of us who have played there.''

Tasker said he has about 60 friends and family members from out of town coming to the game, and in all he is using about 200 tickets to accommodate everyone in his party including his father who had open-heart surgery less than five weeks ago.

Monastic Life
The monastic life, that venerable institution which in the course of a long history has won for itself notable renown in the Church and in human society, should be preserved with care and its authentic spirit permitted to shine forth ever more splendidly both in the East and the West. The principal duty of monks is to offer a service to the divine majesty at once humble and noble within the walls of the monastery, whether they dedicate themselves entirely to divine worship in the contemplative life or have legitimately undertaken some apostolate or work of Christian charity. Retaining, therefore, the characteristics of the way of life proper to them, they should revive their ancient traditions of service and so adapt them to the needs of today that monasteries will become institutions dedicated to the edification of the Christian people.
Vatican II, Perfecatae Caritatis, #9

___________________________________________________
Indeed, St. Basil created a very special monasticism: it was not closed to the community of the local Church but instead was open to it. His monks belonged to the particular Church; they were her life-giving nucleus and, going before the other faithful in the following of Christ and not only in faith, showed a strong attachment to him - love for him - especially through charitable acts. These monks, who ran schools and hospitals, were at the service of the poor and thus demonstrated the integrity of Christian life.
-Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, July 4, 2007

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



The Abbey: 150 years
BC Knights of Columbus: 50 years
FOCUS: 10 years
CLU at BC: 5 years
Steve Tasker: on the Bills Wall of Fame
+Jim Huss
+Art Neumann

Saint Benedict’s Abbey-150 Years
The following is from the Diary of our founder, Father Henry Peter Lemke, OSB. He describes how, as a convert, it was an experience in Kansas that helped him come to love our Blessed Mother.

O, you dearest Mother of God, I thought to myself, you actually have heard my prayers! It was through the pure and unsullied soul of a child that you effected something so that the mother would be aroused and would then place a lamp in the window just about the very time when I was calling out for help because I feared for my life. Pure chance, some people would say. As far as I’m concerned, people can say what they want, but I am not about to question my firm conviction that, in this instance, the Mother of God worked a miracle. And for this reason, I promised to love and honor her until I draw my very last breath. These two events, along with the fact that my going to Kansas was the initiation of the Benedictine order here, lead me to say that my time in Kansas was well worth it.

Knights of Columbus at BC- 50 Years
The actual 50th anniversary of the St. Benedict’s College Council of the Knights of Columbus will be in December of 2008. We are beginning now, along with some alumns, to make plans for this celebration. The Knights, over these nearly fifty years, have been at Benedictine College what they have been throughout the world, the right hand of the Catholic Church.

FOCUS National Conference- 10 Years
I remember very well 10 years ago this fall working with Dr. Ted Sri to organize the very first FOCUS event. I am very happy to see the growth that has happened in these 10 years as the program has moved from Benedictine College to the entire country.

The Fellowship of Catholic University Students announces a 10th anniversary conference to be held at January 2-6, 2008 at the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center at Grapevine, Tx. The theme of this event is Go, and set the world on Fire. For more information go to the FOCUS website at: http://www.focusonline.org/

Communion and Liberation (CLU) at BC- 5 Years
Write to Father Meinrad ( mmiller@benedictine.edu ) or talk to a CL leader about the schedule for this year. On different weeks the following groups will meet:

Big School of Community. all together (with Sal, where we can bring our questions)
Small School of Community. (with the leader/group you choose)
3:59. (Cultural event. Movie or music presentation) (Just as the Disciples found the Lord, and it was Four O’Clock; so many are stuck at 3:59, waiting to encounter Christ.)

Small School of Community (Meets this week) Students are free to join any of these groups.
Joey Orrino’s group will be meeting in the upper lounge of the Student Union at 7pm on Thursday.
Beth Stokman and Kati Jansen’s group will be meeting in the Schroll Center (Mcdonald's Lounge) Wednesday at 7pm.
Fr. Meinrad's group will meet on Mondays at 7:30 PM in the upper lounge of the Student Union.
Non students interested in CL should contact Father Meinrad at this e-mail for information about meeting times.

Pope John Paul II to CL:

The original pedagogical intuition of your Movement (Communion and Liberation) lies precisely here: proposing in a fascinating way, and in harmony with contemporary culture, the Christian event, perceived as a source of new values, capable of directing the whole of existence. It is necessary and urgent to help people to encounter Christ, so that He become the ultimate reason for living and operating also for present-day man. This experience of faith generates a new way of looking at reality, a responsibility and a creativity that concern every ambit of existence: from work to family relationships, from social commitment to the animation of the cultural and political environment.

-Pope John Paul II

Steve Tasker, A Kansas Hero
Steve Tasker, a supporter of our Benedictine College March for Life trip, and fellow Buffalo Bill player with Benedictine College alumn Jamie Mueller, BC ‘97, will be honored by having his name placed on the Buffalo Bills Wall of Fame next Sunday September 9 at half time of the season opener with the Denver Broncos.

In 2000 the NFL Hall of Fame voted Steve Tasker to the All-Time NFL Team. There he joined 26 other players - from the likes of Jim Brown and Walter Payton - as the best of the best players in the history of the game.

Today, Steve is a commentator for CBS sports, a host on the Empire Sports Network and member of the WNSA broadcast lineup. The Tasker family still calls Buffalo home, and while Steve may have hung up his player jersey he still plays to crowds and draws applause from a new fan base who come to see his performance in local community theater.

+JAMES ALOYSIUS (JIM) HUSS
Thursday, June 18, 1931 -
Thursday, August 30, 2007
Resident of Atchison, Kansas
Services to be held on Monday, September 03, 2007 | 11: am
at St. Benedict's Church with Rev. Gerard Senecal, OSB as celebrant. Interment will follow in Mt. Calvary Cemetery. A parish and Knights of Columbus rosary to be recited on Sunday, Sept. 2nd at 4:00 P.M. at Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home. Memorials are suggested to Maur Hill-Mt. Academy School, Sacred Heart Church, Atchison Catholic Elementary School or St. Benedict's Church.

JAMES ALOYSIUS (JIM) HUSS is survived by:
a daughter, Mary E. Stecher, Atchison, KS, two sons, Anthony (Tony) Huss, Kansas City, MO, Timothy L. Huss, Lakewood, CO, two brothers, William L. Huss, Mulvane, KS, Raymond R. Huss, Independence, MO and four grandchildren.

He was predeceased by his parents, and two brothers, Eugene H. Huss and Maurice J. Huss.
Jim was born in Atchison, Kansas the son of John L. and Margaret Geisendorf Huss. He was reared in Doniphan, Kansas where he spent his entire early life on the family farm. He was a graduate of Maur Hill Prep School in 1949.

He and the former Irene Kay Stamper were united in marriage on September 5, 1955 at St. John the Baptist Church, Doniphan, KS. Mrs. Huss preceded him in death on August 20, 2000.

Jim joined the United States Air Force on June 23, 1949 and was honorably discharged on July 28, 1949 due to health problems.

He went to work at the former LFM Company in Atchison in 1950 in the machine shop. He transferred to the payroll department in 1955 and became supervisor of payroll in 1959. In 1974, Jim went to work for the First Stockyard Bank in St. Joseph, Missouri. In 1975, he returned to the foundry, which was then known as the Rockwell International Corporation and worked in the cost estimating section of the engineering department. He transferred back to the payroll department in 1976 and retired on September 30, 1993.

He served as president of the Kanza Chapeter of the Kansas Anthropology Assoc., a member of the Kansas Anthropology Assoc., founder and president of the Atchison County Diabetes Assoc., former president of the Atchison Coin & Stamp Club, a member of the Farm Bureau and Council #723 of the Knights of Columbus. He appraised coin collections for many individuals and estates. He helped conduct many coin auctions in the Atchison area. He was publisher and editor of the Atchison Coin & Stamp Newsletter, the Kanza News and the Diabetic News. He also prepared income tax returns for many years.

+ARTHUR D. "ART" NEUMANN
Monday, December 29, 1924 -
Saturday, September 01, 2007
Resident of Atchison, Kansas
Services to be held on Thursday, September 06, 2007 | 10:30 am
Sacred Heart Church with Rev. Gerard Senecal, OSB as celebrant. Inurnment will follow in Mt. Calvary Cemetery. A parish rosary will be recited on Wednesday, September 5th at 7:00 P.M. in the chapel of Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home with visitation to follow until 8:30 P.M. Memorial contributions are suggested to St. Benedict's Abbey or American Lung Association.

ARTHUR D. "ART" NEUMANN is survived by:
two daughters, Judy Procter, Lake St. Louis, MO, Jere Heck, Overland Park, KS, three sons, Tom Neumann, Manhattan, KS, Frank Neumann, Chugiak, Alaska, James Neumann, Atchison, KS, one brother, Dick Neumann, Atchison, KS, seven grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

He was predeceased by three sisters, Ann Bellis, Ruth Owens, Margaret Neumann, and two brothers, Charles Neumann and Francis Neumann.

Art was born in Atchison, Kansas the son of Frank and ellen Langan Neumann.
He and the former Catheline Agee were united in marriage on September 1, 1947 at St. Benedict's Church, Atchison, Kansas. Mr. Neumann passed away on what would have been the sixtieth wedding anniversary for he and his wife. Mrs. Neumann predeceased him on August 16, 2005. Art served as the building trades instructor at the Northeast kansas Area Vocational Technical School, now the Atchison Vocational Technical College, from the mid 1970's until the early 1990's. Prior to his teaching he worked as a brick-layer for several years. In addition he was a farmer and stockman.

He was a member of Sacred heart Church, a former member and president of the Atchison YMCA and the Fleming-Jackson-Seever Post #6 of the American Legion. Art also was a member of the Donut Shop Coffee Club.
He enjoyed spending time at the Neumann Farm and most of all the quality time he spent with his family, especially his grandchildren. He formerly enjoyed the game of golf.
He served in the Army Air Corp during World War II.

___________________________________________________
Indeed, St. Basil created a very special monasticism: it was not closed to the community of the local Church but instead was open to it. His monks belonged to the particular Church; they were her life-giving nucleus and, going before the other faithful in the following of Christ and not only in faith, showed a strong attachment to him - love for him - especially through charitable acts. These monks, who ran schools and hospitals, were at the service of the poor and thus demonstrated the integrity of Christian life.
-Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, July 4, 2007

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Funeral Arrangements for Jim Huss
Rosary, Sunday, September 2, 4:00 PM, Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home, Atchison, Ks
Mass of Christian Burial, Monday, September 3, 11:00 AM, St. Benedict’s Catholic Church, Atchison, KS. Father Gerard Senecal, OSB, presiding and homilist.

Rehabilitation
of the Religious Sense
From the very beginning, Lent confronts us with the truth of our radical dependence on the Mystery that is the source of our existence, not to depress us, but to launch us on the journey that will allow us to recognize the revelation that “everything is grace”

By Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete
(From Traces Magazine)

Recently, I had the opportunity to read the text from which Fr. Giussani said he took the term “the religious sense” to describe our need for the infinite Mystery at the origin of our existence. The term appeared in a Pastoral Letter written in 1957 by the Archbishop of Milan, Giovanni Montini–who later became Pope Paul VI. He defined the religious sense as a natural attitude of the human being which allows us to perceive our relation with divinity. This attitude or orientation is an “innate” aspiration or appetite, submitted to the rule of reason but instinctively oriented to God, as if guided by a superior power. Montini wrote in his letter that this “religious sense” is “like man’s opening to God, the inclination of man toward his beginning and his ultimate destiny.” It is the natural posture of the soul, the defining orientation of the creature as a human being, the “synthesis of the spirit.”

When this “religious sense” hears the Word of God, it recognizes it and brings about the experience of correspondence with what we call “the heart,” so that the divine Word is not received only passively, but as something that “warms” this source of our life and makes of our faith a living reality that identifies us, and not a mere formalism. According to Montini, and Fr. Giussani, our greatest need today is a “rehabilitation” of this religious sense. Without it, Christian life is destroyed by a crippling dualism that empties faith of its power.

It is not surprising that Montini wrote his Pastoral Letter for the season of Lent. The prayers, almsgiving, and sacrifices associated with Lent are meant to help us rehabilitate our religious sense by an education of our desires that will allow us to recognize those desires that constitute the human heart’s need for God. This education prepares the heart for the encounter with the Risen Christ at Easter. Through them, the Church community accompanies the catechumens on their journey to Baptism.

From the very beginning, Lent confronts us with the truth of our radical dependence on the Mystery that is the source of our existence (“Remember, man, that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”), not to depress us, but to launch us on the journey that will enable us to recognize the revelation that “everything is grace,” because the Mystery sustaining our existence is a God that is Love.

That is why Pope Benedict XVI has urged us not to celebrate Lent with an “old” spirit, as a burdensome and heavy duty, but to do it with a “new” spirit of the one “who has encountered in Jesus and His paschal mystery the meaning of life and who now experiences that everything must refer to Him.”

___________________________________________________
Indeed, St. Basil created a very special monasticism: it was not closed to the community of the local Church but instead was open to it. His monks belonged to the particular Church; they were her life-giving nucleus and, going before the other faithful in the following of Christ and not only in faith, showed a strong attachment to him - love for him - especially through charitable acts. These monks, who ran schools and hospitals, were at the service of the poor and thus demonstrated the integrity of Christian life.
-Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, July 4, 2007

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



+Jim Huss. May he have eternal rest.
(From Father Gerard Senecal, OSB, Ph.D., Pastor of St. Benedict’s Parish)
Members of the Jim Huss family gathered around his bedside at Heartland East Hospital in St. Joseph, Missouri, last evening as he received the call from his Lord to come to everlasting life. Present at the time were Mary Stecher, daughter and nurse at Atchison Hospital, Tony Huss, son and frequenter of our Perpetual Adoration Chapel, and David Stecher, grandson of Jim and son of Mary. Jim with great courage continued coming to Mass, even daily Mass, for as long as he was physically able to do so. He surely is a wonderful example of how to prepare for meeting the Lord.

Millard Miller, Mike Burns and I visited with Jim Huss on Sunday, Aug. 26, at Heartland. Jim was in good spirits, and talked about many things but he knew the end of his life was near. On Wednesday Dr. Ranganini said Jim would not last beyond Thursday. I asked Fr. Roderic Giller to go from St. Joseph's, Wathena, to offer the prayers for the dying for Jim on Wednesday evening. The next evening I had the opportunity to offer the same prayers again, following our praying the Rosary for Jim. May Jim Huss rest in peace.

Jim Huss was a native of the Doniphan area, and because of this he was the principal person looking after the well being of the St. John's Church in Doniphan. The Mass at St. Benedict's Church on Thursday morning was for Jim's late wife, Kay; this Mass was on her birthday. Looking in the centennial history of St. Benedict's Church, 1966, there is a picture of the church committee for that year that includes James A. Huss, William Dykstra, William H. Wolters, and Francis Carrigan. Jim Huss also was much involved in the Kansas State Archeological Society, and only recently had gone on a "dig" for two weeks. Jim was a good man. Please remember him in your prayers.

There follows here a part of the homily I gave for Jim's wife, Kay, in the year 2000:
Irene Kay Huss, Aug. 20, 2000. St. Paul compares the love of husband and wife with the love which Christ has for his church. Jesus knelt down to wash the feet of his apostles. He told them: "If I who am your lord and master have washed your feet, so also you ought to love one another." When husband and wife have this kind of love for each other, it is a wonderful blessing.

Parents also have the tremendous responsibility and the great joy of cooperating with God in bringing new life into this world and of guiding that new life into the ways of God. Parents know how to give good things to their children, just as God makes his rain to fall and his sun to shine on all his children. Parents love their children.

Sacred Scripture has the promise of wonderful blessings for children who honor their parents. "He who honors his father atones for sins. He stores up riches who reveres his mother. With your whole heart honor your father; your mother's birth pangs forget not. Remember, of these parents you were born; what can you give them for all they have given you?"

Jim, everyone here this morning joins me in offering prayerful sympathies to you, to Mary, Tony, Tim, David and all the members of your family. You have lost a wonderful wife, mother, grandmother, sister. This morning you come here in sadness, but you come also to thank God for the blessing Kay has been for you. Many people are here to support you.

Kay was a native of St. Joseph, Missouri. She attended grade and high school there, and then worked for a while in California. Jim met Kay. They loved each other. On September 5, 1955, they married at St. John’s Church, Doniphan. They enjoyed nearly 45 years of marriage. This surely has been a blessing for you, Jim, and for all the members of your family. Kay spent her life in service for others, members of her family and children served by the kitchen at USD 409.

___________________________________________________
A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath,
-James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Archbishop Keleher visits Maur Hill Mount Academy
Recognizing Christ, Serving others
Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR
Monastic Wisdom

Archbishop Keleher Visits Maur Hill Mount Academy
Yesterday, on the Feast of the Beheading of Saint John the Baptist, our retired Archbishop James Patrick Keleher visited Maur Hill Mount Academy here in Atchison. He celebrated Mass for the students and faculty, concelebrated by the school chaplain, Father Marion, Abbot Barnabas, Prior James, and Father Meinrad. I was impressed with the reverence of the students, and the words of wisdom of the Archbishop.

Recognizing Christ, serving Others
September 8th will be Benedictine College’s Atchison Clean-up day, and we would love to get as many students involved as possible. It is run through the Atchison Chamber of Commerce. If you or anyone you know is interested in being on a team, talk to Kelly Dineen keldineen@gmail.com and she’ll sign you up!

Secondly, September 22nd, also a Saturday, is our fall service day. Students will participate in various projects throughout the Atchison and surrounding communities. One of these projects is helping Habitat for Humanity build a home in St. Joseph. Others include visiting the nursing home, delivering meals for Hunger Coalition, a supplies drive, helping at the Humane Society, and possibly visiting the juvenile correctional facility or a soup kitchen. There will be more info on these things at the ministry fair tonight or you can talk to me! We'd love to have many students and faculty members participate!

Fr. Benedict Groeschel , CFR
Monday, October 29, 4:00 PM
O’Malley-Mcalister Auditorium
Fr. Groeschel Live! Meet the famous priest, Father Benedict J. Groeschel, CFR, seen by millions of viewers each week on “Sunday Night: Live with Fr. Benedict Groeschel,” as he leads an evening spiritual conference at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, October 29, 4 p.m. The conference, ""Springtime of Faith,"" features an early bird ticket price of $10 if purchased before October 10. The regular price for tickets at the door is $15.00. BC students are free with ID. Register by calling Dona Domann at 913-360-7699."

Monastic Wisdom
St. Pachomius, founder of Koinonia in Egypt
(Reg., nn 139, 140, CR 1:32’ PL 23,82; Boon Pachomiana Latina, pp 49-50)
...There should be no one in the monastery who does not learn to read and know something of the Scriptures – as a minimum, the New Testament and the Psalms.

St. Gregory the Great, First Benedictine Pope
(Lib. IV, ep. 31 ad Theodorum medicum, PL 77:706)
The Emperor of heaven, the Lord of men and angels, has sent you his epistles for your life’s blood; and yet, excellent son, you neglect to read these epistles ardently. Study then I beseech you, and daily meditate on the words of your Creator. Learn the heart of God in the words of God, that you may long more ardently for the things that are eternal; that your soul may be kindled with more intense desire for heavenly joys. For a man will have the greater rest in those joys in the proportion that he now allows himself to rest in the love of his Maker. But, that you may act this, may almighty God pour into you the Spirit, the Comforter; may he fill your soul with his presence, and in filling it, compose it.

St. Jerome
(Ep. 5 ad Florentium, n.2, PL 22:337)
Such books (explanation of the Psalms, and St. Hilary’s work on the Synods) must be the food of the Christian soul if it is to mediate on the law of the Lord day and night.

St. Augustine
(Lib, de spiritu et anima, c. 32, PL 40, 802)
The soul ascends to God by meditation and contemplation; but God descends to the soul by revelation and divine inspiration.

John Cassian
(De coenob. Institut., Lib IV, c. 19, PL 49:179, 180)
The monks are to keep the utensils of the monastery with the utmost care and solicitude, so that none of them may be harmed or destroyed; for they believe that even for the smallest vessels they must give an account as though of sacred vessels, not only to a present steward, but to the Lord...wherefore if anything has once been brought into the monastery they should hold, that it ought to be treated with the utmost reverence as a holy thing.

___________________________________________________
A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath,
-James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Campus Ministry
Thanks to all who helped with the Opening School Mass today on the Feast of Saint Augustine: Father Brendan, MC, the student musicians, servers, ushers, and Eucharistic Ministers, and Mike O’Hare and Br. Lawrence, the MCs of the academic procession. There will be an activities fair for students to find out about campus ministry organizations. This will be from 8-10 PM on Wednesday, August 29 in the BC Student Union Atrium. Hope to see you there.
BC Freshman Retreat: September 7-9, Ralph Nolan Gymn
September 8 (Birth of the Virgin Mary) Student Kelly Dineen will be leading a project for upper classmen to build a home.

Fr. Benedict Groeschel , CFR
Monday, October 29, 4:00 PM
O’Malley-Mcalister Auditorium
Fr. Groeschel Live! Meet the famous priest, Father Benedict J. Groeschel, CFR, seen by millions of viewers each week on “Sunday Night: Live with Fr. Benedict Groeschel,” as he leads an evening spiritual conference at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, October 29, 4 p.m. The conference, ""Springtime of Faith,"" features an early bird ticket price of $10 if purchased before October 10. The regular price for tickets at the door is $15.00. BC students are free with ID. Register by calling Dona Domann at 913-360-7699."

Communion and Liberation
Write to Father Meinrad, or talk to a CL leader about the schedule for this year.

On different weeks the following groups will meet:

Big School of Community. all together (with Sal, where we can bring our questions)
Small School of Community. (with the leader/group you choose)
3:59. (Cultural event. Movie or music presentation) (Just as the Disciples found the Lord, and it was Four O’Clock; so many are stuck at 3:59, waiting to encounter Christ.)
Small School of Community.

BC Communion and Liberation Student Groups
Joey Orrino’s group will be meeting in the upper lounge of the Student Union at 7pm on Thursday.
Beth Stokman and Kati Jansen’s group will be meeting in the Schroll Center (Mcdonald's Lounge) Wednesday at 7pm.
Fr. Meinrad's group will meet on Mondays at 7:30 PM in the upper lounge of the Student Union.
Non students interested in CL should contact Father Meinrad at this e-mail for information about meeting times.

___________________________________________________
A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath,
-James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



CL Documentary
This evening, Sunday August 26, there will be a viewing of the Communion and Liberation Documentary from Italian TV in the Benedictine College Student Union Second Floor Classroom at 8:30 PM. All are welcome.

Opening School Mass
The Benedictine College opening school Mass will be at 9:30 AM on Tuesday, August 28 in the Abbey Church. This is also the Feast of Saint Augustine, an appropriate day to celebrate our community of faith, scholarship, and communion in Christ and in the Church.

___________________________________________________
A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. -Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Saint Bernard

College Mass Schedule. Masses start today, Monday August 20, Feast of St. Bernard
Eucharistic Holy Hour
+Delphine Schmitz, May she Rest in Peace
Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR to speak at Benedictine College October 29
Jim Kelly’s Tribute to Steve Tasker

Today is the Feast of Saint Bernard, Cistercian Monk

In dangers, in doubts, in difficulties, think of Mary, call upon Mary. Let not her name depart from your lips, never suffer it to leave your heart. And that you may obtain the assistance of her prayer, neglect not to walk in her footsteps. With her for guide, you shall never go astray; while invoking her, you shall never lose heart; so long as she is in your mind, you are safe from deception; while she holds your hand, you cannot fall; under her protection you have nothing to fear; if she walks before you, you shall not grow weary; if she shows you favor, you shall reach the goal.

- Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

College Mass Schedule begins today, Monday August 20,
the Feast of Saint Bernard, Cistercian Monk
Saint Martin’s Chapel
Monday-Friday: 12:05 PM (12:10 PM on Tuesday. Thursday)
Monday-Thursday: 9:30 PM
Saint Benedict’s Abbey Church
Sunday: 5:30 PM and 7:30 PM
Saint Benedict’s Abbey Masses
Monday-Friday: 5:15 PM
Saturday, 11:30 AM
Sunday: 10:00 AM
Saint Benedict’s Parish Masses
Monday-Saturday, 8:20 AM
Saturday (Vigil of Sunday) 5:15 PM
Sunday, 8:30 and 10:30 AM, and 6:30 PM
Mt. St. Scholastica Monastery Masses
Monday-Friday: 7:15 AM
Saturday: 9:15 AM
Sunday: 10:15 AM

Eucharistic Holy Hour
Every Saturday evening from 8-9 PM, join the monks for a Eucharistic Holy Hour in the Abbey Church. Come let us adore our Lord who became man, and dwells among us!!!

+Delphine Schmitz
Delphine Schmitz died Thursday August 16. She and her husband lived in my home parish growing up. She would often help lead the Holy Rosary with my mother before Mass. She was also a first cousin of our Bishop Herbert Hermes, OSB, a monk of the Abbey serving as Bishop of Cristalandia, Brazil for the last 17 years.

Rosary was last evening at 9:30 a.m. Monday at Holy Cross Catholic Church, Hutchinson. Mass of Christian Burial will be today at 10 a.m. Monday, Aug. 20, at the church, with Father Joe Eckbert presiding. Visitation will be from 1 to 9 p.m. Sunday at Penwell Gabel Funeral Home and Crematory, Hutchinson, with the family present from 2 to 6 p.m. Interment will be in Waterloo Cemetery, Waterloo.

Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR,
to speak here at BC on October 29
I am very excited to announce that a true friend of Benedictine College will be returning this October. Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, will be speaking in the O’Malley McAlister Auditorium at Benedictine College on Monday, October 29, at 4:00 PM (Note the time change from the previously announced 7:30). The topic of his presentation will be Springtime of Faith. The talk is free for BC faculty and students with IDS. For other the cost is $10 before October 10, $15 following. To make your reservation please call Dona Domman at (913) 360-7699. Father Benedict first spoke at Benedictine College on March 25, 1996, the Feast of the Annunciation. His topic at that time was Being Loyal to Christ in a Time of Change.

Jim Kelly’s Tribute to Steve Tasker
On Septmember 7-9 Prior James Albers, OSB from the Abbey and I have been invited to go to Buffalo for Steve Tasker’s induction onto the Bills Wall of Fame. Steve will also be announcing the Buffalo-Denver game for CBS Sports that day.
The following is from the foreword by Jim Kelly to Steve Tasker’s Tales from the Buffalo Bills. Champaign, Il: Sports Publishing, by Steve Tasker and Scott Pitoniak
During my years playing in the National Football League, I had the opportunity to compete with and against scores of talented athletes. Many of theme were close teammates who understood and shared my passion for playing the game we loved. There was one, however, who stood out as a leader, an athlete, a great family man, and a great friend-Steve Tasker...
At training camp with the Bills, Steve was a player no one wanted to cover or could cover for that matter. All the defensive backs would challenge each other to see how they would fare against his speed and toughness. Nobody touched him. This was not exclusive to our team; it happened around the league.
He excelled in special teams play in the NFL. In fact, teams game-planned around Steve. You could see how they would have him double covered, and if that didn’t work, a third guy would peel off to try and stop Steve’s progress. But we know that wasn’t possible- he played with heart, soul, and a determination unmatched by many players today. He could see the field and the openings better than anyone. He could find the player with the ball and make a hit that no one would forget.
...I will never forget that at each and every game, Steve and I would wait in the tunnel, shoulder to shoulder. We would walk onto the field, proud to be a part of the Buffalo Bills. But at Super Bowl XXV, as we stood in the tunnel at one of the greatest games of our lives...We could feel the rippling effect of the band, the crowd, and the energy. We walked out, and there were the flashes of cameras everywhere. I will always remember it as one of the best trips we took as teammates down the tunnel.
When I reflect on that time in our lives, I know it was not only his talent and ability on the field that impressed me but how he conducted himself off the field. Steve has always been a great family man and understands what is important in life-family.
Jim Kelly, Pro Football Hall of Fame Quarterback.

___________________________________________________
A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath,
-James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Christ the King, Topeka
Benedictine College: Growing in Faith
Leader of Communion and Liberation on EWTN
Whispers of Communion and Liberation

Christ the King, Topeka
This weekend I had the honor of celebrating the Masses at Christ the King Catholic Church in Topeka, Ks. I spoke to the people about the Priory our monks established in Brazil. As always I saw many people who graduated from the Mount, St. Benedict’s, Benedictine College, or our high school.

Benedictine College: Growing in Faith
The most amazing aspect of the growth here at Benedictine College is not just that the number of students has nearly doubled since I first came here as Chaplain in 1994. The most amazing aspect is the hunger these young people have for community, for beauty, for truth, for justice, for their Catholic faith, and for Christ. The same is true at Newman Centers and youth ministry program around the world. While the media wants us to believe that faith is dead, the young people are showing that it is alive and well. As Jesus told us in the Gospel, I have come to light a fire on the earth. May we rejoice in that fire of Mercy.

Our Benedictine College President, Steve Minnis has assembled a great leadership team to help carry on the great work of evangelization.

Leader of Communion and Liberation to appear on Rome Reports on EWTN
Thought you might like to know that on EWTN, the showed called Rome Reports, a weekly news program, will next Sunday, 26 August, 10 a.m. eastern, have an interview with Father Julian Carron, leader of Communion ad Liberation. You can also pick up the video clip by visiting: www.romereports.com; web site is frequently updated.

Whispers in the Loggia
Sunday, August 19, 2007
Destiny: Truth. Destination: Communion and Liberation,
Benedict XVI's favorite of the church's "new movements" kicked off its annual seaside conference this morning with a word of encouragement from afar and, befitting its still-increasing global profile, a more succinct message than in years past.

Held every August in the Adriatic resort town of Rimini, Comunione e Liberazione's (Communion and Liberation) weeklong "Meeting for Friendship Among Peoples" has long been a magnet for Italy's ecclesiastical, cultural, political and academic classes. In recent years, however -- and particularly since the election of one of its red-clad cheerleaders to the chair of Peter -- the conference's net has gotten even wider. Case in point: tucked into the lengthy days of concerts, caffč meetings, presentations and round-table discussions is a panel on American jurisprudence headlined by none other than Supreme Court Associate Justice Samuel Alito.

Begun in Milan by the late Msgr Luigi Giussani -- whose 2005 funeral homily was preached before a packed Milan Duomo and Italy-wide TV audience by then-Cardinal Ratzinger, exactly two months before his first public liturgy as Pope -- the CL is better appreciated in practice than explorations of its foundational texts; a long-running line in church circles is that few, if any, can comprehend Don Gius' published streams of thought. In that vein, while last year's Rimini, drawing from the founder's pen, took "Reason is the need for the infinite and culminates in the longing for and the presentiment of this infinite becoming manifest" as its topic, this year's theme is the (much) more easily-approachable "Truth is the destiny for which we have been made."

The meeting's formal opening event last night was a musical on Joan of Arc (written by US composer) played over the backdrop of a 1928 silent film on the French heroine, but events kicked into full gear this morning with a Mass celebrated before a crowd of 10,000 by the Secretary of State Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone SDB, acting as papal legate.

"In the current socio-cultural discourse," Benedict's "Vice-Pope" said in his homily, truth "has come to lose its universal value, becoming a 'relative' reference. In fact, the term 'truth' has often become equalized to that of an opinion, which then necessarily descends into the plural: there then exist many truths, many opinions which are often quite different. Sometimes one has the impression that, in the climate of relativism and skepticism that pervades our civilization, this has the effect of proclaiming a radical distrust in the possibility of knowing the truth."

Bertone contrasted his perception of modernity with the Sunday reading's recounting of the prophet Jeremiah who, he said, preached "not a truth of compromise or of comfort, an opportunistic truth, but the truth for its own sake, a truth correlated precisely to the divine will, however uncomfortable."

"The one who hears hears God, the one who clashes places himself against God," he said, comparing Jeremiah's consignment to the cistern to the crucifixion of Jesus "for having given testimony to the truth."
In its coverage, the Italian press has focused more intensely on Bertone's post-liturgy press conference, where he made comments underscoring the moral imperative on paying taxes. The issue was raised amidst calls by the separatist leader Umberto Bossi, head of the Northern League party, for a "tax strike" as a protest against the government of Premier Romano Prodi.

The Pope's ties to the cielini -- as the CL's adherents are known -- run far and deep. Four laywomen of the movement's communal arm, the Memores Domini, comprise the household staff of the papal apartment, and one of the women leads Benedict and the others of the household in the weekly "School of Community" catechesis every Saturday.

Meeting with a St Peter's Square-ful of cielini in March to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Holy See's recognitio of the Comunione's statutes, the pontiff praised Giussani as his "true friend," through whom "the Holy Spirit raised in the Church a Movement -- yours -- that would witness to the beauty of being Christian in an age when the opinion was spreading that Christianity is a difficult and oppressive way to live."

Further underscoring his ringing endorsement of it as his "model" ecclesial movement, Benedict said that the CL "offers a profound way of life and it actualizes the Christian faith."

The Pope said that "the Pope still wants yet again to repeat that the original pedagogical intuition of Communion and Liberation lies in reproposing the Christian event within contemporary culture in a fascinating and harmonious way, perceived as a font of new values and able to orient one's entire existence." And with a line like that, you can tell he's read Giussani.

At the close of today's Angelus, Benedict offered his closeness in prayer to the Rimini gathering, confident that it will enhance awareness of "the most profound vocation of man: to be a seeker of truth and, thus, a seeker of God."

___________________________________________________
A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. -Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works
Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Move in Day
Today is the day that Freshmen and new students arrive at Benedictine College. Our enrollment will be close to 1300 for the Fall of 2007, double of when I started back here as Chaplain in 1994. I’m impressed with the maturity, and generosity of this new class. Continue to pray for our faculty, staff, students and alumni that the Holy Spirit continue to use this moment to do great things.

Monsignor Giussani on the Holy Rosary

by Luigi Giussani
The Holy Rosary, the most widespread prayer that popular tradition has handed down to us, has over the centuries consecrated the most humble aspect of the Virgin’s life. As we recite it, the figure of Mary rises up, as it were, in its simplest and most recondite aspect. But in urging you to live the Rosary with a special rediscovery of awareness of what Our Lady is in the life of man and the world, I am led above all by the strongest impression I received during my journey through the Holy Land.

The thing that amazed me most and in a sense paralyzed my spirit–paralyzed in the sense of awestruck–was when I saw the little, remaining grotto-house where the Virgin lived and I read an unassuming little plaque on which was written: Verbum caro hic factum est–The Word was made flesh here. I was as though petrified by the sudden evidence of the method of God, who took something that was nothing, really nothing.

Jesus’ Agony in the Garden
“Now my soul is sorrowful; and what must I say, ‘Father, save me from this hour [faced with the thought of sacrifice, the thought of death, of self-denial…]’? But it is for this that I have come to this hour [for this, for this condition have I been chosen, called, lovingly taught by the mystery of the Father, by the charity of the Son, by the warm light of the Spirit. Now my soul is sorrowful and what must I say, ‘Father, save me from this hour’? ‘Take away this condition, Father, take away this condition.’ Must I say this? But it is precisely for this that I have come to this hour!].” Thus I can say at the end, “Father, glorify Your name [glorify Your will, bring about, realize Your plan], which I do not comprehend [because He did not comprehend the great injustice]. Father, glorify Your name in front of which I stand in fear and trembling, in obedience–that is to say, in love. My life is Your plan, it is Your will.”

How many times–praying to the Spirit and the Virgin Mary–will we have to reread this passage in order to identify with the most lucid and fascinating instant in which the consciousness of the Man Christ, Jesus, expressed itself. We can come upon this by surprise, from its deepest recesses to the highest peaks of His example of love for Being, of respect for the objectivity of Being, of love for His origin and His destiny, and for the contents of the plan of time, of history. “Father, if possible, let me not die; however, not my but Your will be done.” This is the supreme application of our acknowledgment of Mystery, adhering to the Man-Christ kneeling and sweating blood from the pores of His skin in His agony in Gethsemane–the condition for being true in a relationship is sacrifice.
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, Founder, Communion and Liberation

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Abbey Postulants

Assumption

Reflection by Matthew Tsakanikas of Benedictine College

New Postulants for the Abbey
Last evening, on the Eve of the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Abbey received three men into the postulancy: Nick Padley, Adam Wilczak, and Stephen Watkins. This is yet another sign of the Springtime of faith here at the Abbey and in the college. Thank you for your continued prayers for more vocations to the monastic life here, and to Dioceses and Religious Orders of men and women everywhere. May our Blessed Mother through her Immaculate Heart draw many souls to her Son, Jesus.

Assumption
Today on the campus, there is Mass at 12:10 PM, and 9:30 PM in the St. Martin’s Chapel of Memorial Hall.
The Abbey Mass will be at 5:00 PM (15 minutes earlier than normal) followed by Vespers.
The monks have invited the faculty and staff of the college and their families to the annual picnic today beginning at about 6:00 PM.

Reflection by Matthew Tsakanikas of Benedictine College
Matt wrote the following reflection that appears today on Catholic Exchange: http://www.catholicexchange.com/

By Matthew Tsakanikas, Benedictine College, Atchison, Kansas
The Second Vatican Council only promulgated two dogmatic constitutions: Dei Verbum (Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation) and Lumen Gentium (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church). Stating this is not meant to downplay the other constitutions and documents of the council. Rather, it is to highlight key opening passages found in a dogmatic context. Certain repeated passages at the start of these dogmatic constitutions beckon the faithful to renew their evangelical pronouncements and catechetical methods by incorporating a recovery of the biblical and patristic understanding of deification (in Greek: theosis) into the New Evangelization.

Byzantine (Greek Catholic and Orthodox) theology, spirituality, and catechetical tradition has always centered on the near-symmetry that "God became man so that man might become God" (cf. CCC#460). The pronouncement balances and encompasses the wider meaning of "salvation" and the purpose of the Incarnation as defended by Saint Athanasius against the Arians. In the East, catechetical reiteration upon "participation in the divine nature" (2 Pet 1:4) and "becoming God" by grace was always standard fare. In the West, the symmetry was never lost but the doctrine seemingly waned catechetically from the time of the 14th Century until the 20th Century. Nevertheless, the heart of the matter was always maintained in Western mystical theology, especially in Saint John of the Cross, and known implicitly in Marian devotion and study. Liturgically, at the Offertory, we still hear, "By the mingling of this water and wine, may we come to share in the divinity of Christ who humbled himself to share in our humanity."

Certainly a creature can never become equal to God in all respects. Such is a contradiction. God had no beginning and is eternal. No creature can ever overcome the fact that he must receive a beginning. No transformation can change the fact that a creature is forever defined by his need for a beginning. A creature forever remains dependent upon God for life and existence. Human nature is a gift and mercy that allows us to overcome 'non-existence'; it is the foundation of our existence. Nevertheless, once a human begins to exist, God can so elevate the capacities of the spiritual soul to know Him that a human begins to participate in God's very power. When God unites Himself to a creature to enable such knowledge, the human can rightly be said to have "become God" by sharing in this union. Without loss to human identity and nature, the grace of deification (becoming God) enables humans into participation in the Trinity and makes humans real family members with God (cf. Jn 1:12).

This teaching is so intrinsic to the Christian message that the dogmatic constitution, Lumen Gentium, immediately stressed God's purpose in creation as: "His plan...to raise men to a participation of the divine life" (#2). The other dogmatic constitution, Dei Verbum reiterates the same at its opening: "through Christ, the Word made flesh, man might in the Holy Spirit have access to the Father and come to share in the divine nature (see Eph. 2:18; 2 Peter 1:4)" (#2). We are called to experience the infinite bliss which God knows, and we are given a share in God's own power to experience Him! On the Feast of the Assumption we should at least briefly reflect upon what deification meant for the Virgin Mary.

Renewing Mariology
Commenting on the theological movement of popes since the Second Vatican Council, Stratford Caldecott, contributing editor to Communio and director of the Centre for Faith and Culture (Oxford) writes: "In particular, it is the 'rediscovered' doctrine of theosis [deification] or divinization by grace, when combined with other fundamental principles of Catholic theology, that indicates how we can safely attribute to our Lady many of the titles and honors that popular devotion wishes to bestow upon her, without driving a wedge between her and the Church, or between her and ourselves" (Logos 3:3 p.89).

An excellent passage from Saint Basil the Great can serve as one such sturdy launching pad for such a reflection and rediscovery. The passage ties closely together the mystery of one's share in the Holy Spirit and one's becoming a source (mediatrix) of grace for others. In his work, De spiritu sancto, Basil explains:

As souls that bear the Spirit are illumined by the Spirit they become spiritual themselves and send forth grace to others. Thence comes foreknowledge of the future, understanding of mysteries, apprehension of things hidden, distribution of spiritual gifts, citizenship in heaven, the dance with the angels, joy without end, divine distribution, likeness to God, and the summit of our longings, namely, to become God (9:23).

Certainly he is speaking of all Christians sending forth grace to others because of their union with the Holy Spirit. The greater such union, the greater they become relative sources of grace. How much more so this must be true of the Saints in heaven who experience the greatest possible union with the Holy Spirit and watch over us! Jesus pointed to such a share in his mediation when he said, "Whoever believes in me will do the works I do and greater ones than these" (John 14:12).

If those who have been touched by sin and are now in heaven can be mediators of grace in Christ, how much more so can the one "conceived without sin" be a mediatrix of grace! She is the Immaculate Conception, totally united with the Holy Spirit from the moment of her conception and never knowing sin due to the saving power of Christ in her predestination. No one believed more in Jesus than the Virgin Mary, and no one received a greater share in Jesus' Spirit (cf. 2 Kings 2:9) than the Virgin Mary. Christ, the new Adam (cf. 1 Cor 15:45) prepared a new Eve to be the mother to all who are participants in the Spirit. Christ's saving office as new Adam and high-priest did not end in death. Nor did Mary's saving office, bestowed at the Annunciation and prepared in the Immaculate Conception, end in death. She is the first to be fully saved in Christ Jesus.

Queen Assumed into Heaven
Sent to earth to be our true Adam and source of deification, Jesus needed to resurrect from the dead, body and soul, so there could be a renewed humanity in which we could share through the Holy Spirit. "High-priest for all humanity" is an office in which only Jesus can serve and an office on behalf of humanity requires someone still fully-human (body and soul): "He learned obedience from what he suffered; and when he was made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all who obey him, declared by God high priest..." (Heb 5:8-9). As a man, Jesus was given a mission, and that mission was not to end in death. He is now the heavenly man who has become "the Last Adam a life-giving spirit" (1 Cor 15:45).

The superabundant and life-giving relationship Jesus has with the Father became accessible to us because the Word (Jesus) was made flesh and dwelt amongst us (John 1:14). He showed us how to enter into this relationship and empowered us to make gifts of ourselves to God. Jesus gives us a participation in his relationship with the Father when he gives us the Holy Spirit to know and love the Father as He does: "No one knows the Son but the Father and no one knows the Father but the Son and anyone to whom the Son wishes to reveal him" (Matthew 11:27). This share in the Son's relationship with the Father is the beginning of our deification as "sons in the Son", the beginning of eternal life in us. Just as we share in Jesus' relationship with the Father through the Holy Spirit, we also share in Christ's one mediation through the same power of the Holy Spirit according as the gift is distributed.

Given the brief nature of this article, it suffices to say that the angel Gabriel's invitation to Mary to be the mother of the Messiah, included a cooperation (an office) which God willed would not end at Jesus' birth. God bestowed an office upon Mary when she agreed that the Spirit should descend upon her and make her fruitful for the sake of the Messiah and his mission; that her heart should be united with his and also be "pierced" (Luke 2:35). Her whole life is dedicated to Christ and she becomes the Mother of all disciples according to the announcement from the Cross: "Behold your Mother!" (John 19:27). The Mother of the Lord is Queen Mother for the Kingdom. The office is three-times re-affirmed. She was there to nurture Christ as a babe and obtain the new wine at the Wedding Feast of Cana. She continues to be there for those newly born of her Son and she participates with the Spirit in bringing them into union with Christ just as she did at Pentecost (Acts 1:14). From her union with the mission of her Son, the Spirit continues to shower us with graces.

"This mediation flows from the superabundance of the merits of Christ, rests on his mediation, depends entirely on it, and draws all its power from it. It does not hinder in any way the immediate union of the faithful with Christ but on the contrary fosters it" (Lumen Gentium #60). Since only she can fill the office of Queen Mother to the Kingdom which Jesus finalized at the Cross, and since Jesus desires to foster union of the faithful with himself, Jesus has already raised her body and soul to continue her office on behalf of humanity.

Taken together with the words of Saint Basil from De spiritu sancto, along with the meaning of our deification, Mary's prerogatives are explained by the Second Vatican Council: "Taken up into heaven, she did not lay aside this saving office but by her manifold intercession continues to procure for us the gifts of eternal salvation...Therefore the blessed Virgin is invoked in the church under the titles of advocate, helper, benefactress, and mediatrix" (Lumen Gentium #62).

"O, Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!"

Matthew Tsakanikas is the Director of the Institute of Religious Studies, a joint effort of Benedictine College and the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas.

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. -Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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New Benedictine College website
Baby Pio Zia
+Sister Regina Hansen, O.S.B.
+Kelly Thorpe Estrada

What is Communion and Liberation?

New Benedictine College Website
Check out the new Benedictine College website at http://www.benedictine.edu

Congratulations to the Zias!

Julia and Dr. Mark Zia are happy to announce that their third child was born via a natural delivery August 6th, the Feast of the Transfiguration, at 11:16 p.m. at Heartland Hospital in St. Joseph. Their son, Pio Pasquale Zia, weighed in at 8 pounds, 1 ounce, and was 21 inches long. He was a bit of a trouble maker, so mom is on the mend, but both are doing well and have returned home as of Wednesday afternoon.

Dr. Zia is the acting Chairman of the Theology department at Benedictine College this fall while Dr. Richard White is teaching at the Florence, Italy, campus of Benedictine College.

+Sister Regina (Mary Urban) Hansen, O.S.B.
December 13, 1919 – August 8, 2007

A gifted woman, Sister Regina used her formidable intellectual energy for research and teaching aimed to advance human welfare. From the undereducated poor who tend to “fall into the cracks” to the higher education that nurtures international understanding, her immense range of interests made her a trailblazer and catalyst for innovative educational programs. Violinist, pianist, administrator, college teacher (U.S., Israel, Egypt), world traveler, Benedictine lover of place, writer – Sister Regina encouraged others to love the arts and to study and serve. Born in Alamosa, Colo., she was the oldest child of Ernest H. and Maria Griesemer Hansen. Sister Regina entered the Mount community June 13, 1941, and made monastic profession Jan. 1, 1943. She earned the MA in music from the Conservatory of Music, Kansas City, Mo., and the MA and PhD in English from Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. She designed an individualized instruction process for DeLaSalle High School in Kansas City, Mo., and administered and explained its instruction/counseling approach for other school systems. As a Fulbright scholar, Sister Regina went to India and to Cairo, Egypt; was visiting professor of English at Kaohsiung Teachers College in Taiwan, taught English at Bethlehem University and chaired the English department there. She taught at Donnelly College, Kansas City, Kans., Mount St. Scholastica College, and Benedictine College, and was an emerita member of its Board of Directors. She embraced “the love of learning and the desire for God.” Let us remember her in grateful prayer.

+Kelly Thorpe Estrada
One of our alums, Tommy Thorpe ’87, lost his sister last week. Her name is Kelly Thorpe Estrada. Kelly was killed by her estranged husband and then he killed himself. Kelly has two children who will now be cared for by Tommy and his parents. Kelly’s funeral is tomorrow (Tuesday) out in Denver. Would you please put them on your prayer list?

What is Communion and Liberation?
“A charism,” Fr. Giussani has written, “can be defined as a gift of the Spirit, given to a person in a specific historical context, so that this person can initiate an experience of faith that might in some way be useful to the life of the Church. I emphasize the existential nature of charism: it makes the Christian message handed down by the apostolic tradition more convincing, more persuasive, more ‘approachable.’ A charism is an ultimate terminal of the Incarnation, that is, it is a particular way in which the Fact of Jesus Christ Man and God reaches me, and through me can reach others.”

The essence of the charism given to Communion and Liberation can be signaled by three factors.
first of all, the announcement that God became man (the wonder, the reasonableness, the enthusiasm for this): “The Word was made flesh and dwells among us.”

secondly, the affirmation that this man – Jesus of Nazareth dead and risen – is a present event in a “sign” of “communion,” i.e., of unity of a people guided, as a guarantee, by a living person, ultimately the Bishop of Rome;
thirdly: only in God made man, man, therefore only in His presence and, thus only through – in some way – the experienceable form of His presence (therefore, ultimately only within the life of the Church) can man be truer and mankind be truly more human. St Gregory Nazianzen writes, “If I were not Yours, my Christ, I would feel like a finished creature”. It is thus from His presence that both morality and the passion for the salvation of man (which is mission) spring up.

“From the first hour of class at the Berchet high school in Milan,” Fr. Giussani recalls, “I tried to show the students what moved me: not the wish to convince them that I was right, but the desire to show them the reasonableness of faith; that is, that their free adhesion to the Christian proclamation was demanded by their discovery of the correspondence of what I was saying with the needs of their hearts, as implied by the definition of reasonableness. Only this dynamic of recognition makes whoever adheres to our movement creative and a protagonist, and not simply one who repeats formulas and things they have heard. For this reason, it seems to me, a charism generates a social phenomenon not as something planned, but as a movement of persons who have been changed by an encounter, who tentatively make the world, the environment, and the circumstances that they encounter more human. The memory of Christ when it is lived tends inevitably to generate a presence in society, above and beyond any planned result.”

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. -Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Springtime of Faith

Steve Tasker, the Wall of Fame,

and BC student Stephanie Mouser

Another Wall of Famer endorses Belmont Abbey College

Springtime of Faith

I am very excited to announce that a true friend of Benedictine College will be returning this October. Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, will be speaking in the O’Malley McAlister Auditorium at Benedictine College on Monday, October 29, at 4:00 PM (Note the time change from the previously announced 7:30). The topic of his presentation will be Springtime of Faith. The talk is free for BC faculty and students with IDS. For other the cost is $10 before October 10, $15 following. To make your reservation please call Dona Domman at (913) 360-7699. Father Benedict first spoke at Benedictine College on March 25, 1996, the Feast of the Annunciation. His topic at that time was Being Loyal to Christ in a Time of Change.

Father Benedict has been Director of the Office of Spiritual Development for the Archdiocese of New York. He founded the Trinity Retreat, a center for prayer and study for the clergy. He was appointed promoter of the cause of canonization of the Servant of God Terence Cardinal Cooke by John Cardinal O’Connor in 1984.

Previously Father Benedict was chaplain of the Children’s Village in Dobb’s Ferry, New York for fourteen years.

Father Benedict obtained his doctorate in psychology from Columbia University in 1971 and has served as professor of pastoral psychology at Saint Joseph’s Seminary of the Archdiocese of New York. He has taught at Fordham University, Iona College, and the Maryknoll Seminary. He is also chairman of the Good Counsel Homes and the St. Francis House which provide residence and program for homeless young mothers and homeless youth.

In May 1987, along with eight other friars, Father Benedict formed the community of Franciscan Friars of the Renewal under the patronage of Cardinal O’Connor of New York. This community, which follow the Capuchin tradition, is dedicated to preaching renewal and personal reform and providing care for the homeless around the world.

Father Benedict has published a number of books and tapes, and CDs on spirituality and pastoral counseling and is familiar to television audiences.

See the first paragraph for information on how to register for this talk.

Steve Tasker, the Wall of Fame,
and BC student Stephanie Mouser
When I told people about Steve Tasker’s being named to the Bills Wall of Fame, BC student Stephanie Mouser mentioned to me that her cousin from Iowa, Josh Stamer, is now playing special teams for the Buffalo Bills. The following article mentions the two players.

Tasker's wisdom is welcomed
Former special teams ace drops in on camp to impart knowledge
Sal Maiorana
Staff writer

(August 6, 2007) — PITTSFORD — The man many people think revolutionized the way special teams are played in the NFL, who has seven Pro Bowl invitations to prove it, resides about 15 minutes from Ralph Wilson Stadium.

"Him being the best special-teamer who ever played in the NFL and living right here in town, it would be stupid of us not to try to get that knowledge out of his head," said Josh Stamer, one of the best special teamers on the current Bills roster, about ex-Bills star and proud western New Yorker Steve Tasker.

Later on, spealing of Tasker, Stamer said: "There's something in there that made him the best besides being scrappy," Stamer said. "He has a ton of knowledge, and he can talk football talk. He can tell you an opponent does this and he can give us the answer to any question we have."

Another Wall of Famer endorses Belmont Abbey College
Belmont Abbey College in North Carolina, a Benedictine school, hosted an event the other year which featured another Buffalo Bill Wall of Famer speaking about the value of Catholic higher education.

Extremely durable and dependable, Joe DeLamielleure had played in 185 consecutive games during his 13 playing seasons with the Bills and the Cleveland Browns. A starter from the first game of his rookie season, he played and started in every game for eight seasons in Buffalo before being traded to Cleveland.

Primarily due to the success of the Bills’ running attack led by Simpson, DeLamielleure was best known for his run blocking. With DeLamielleure manning the front line, O.J. became the first player to rush for more than 2,000 yards in a season. But, he was more than just a run blocker, DeLamielleure was also an effective pass blocker and rarely allowed his opponent to disrupt Buffalo’s or Cleveland’s pass plays. DeLamielleure, who was named to the NFL’s 1970s All-Decade Team, finished his career in 1985 with a final season back where it had begun, in Buffalo.

Twelve years later, he was honored by the Bills by being placed on the team’s Wall of Fame at Ralph Wilson Stadium.

"It meant a lot. It meant a whole lot,” said DeLamielleure in an interview at the time. “I wish my parents were both alive, they both had passed away by that time. It was my proudest moment in football because it’s not for a game like when you get a game ball or go to a Pro Bowl for a season - that’s for a career. It’s the best honor I’ve ever had in football."

Hundreds of students and their families had an opportunity to hear Joe DeLamielleure’s story when he gives his talk, “The Values of Catholic Higher Education,” during a special reception on April 4, 2006 at 6:00 PM at the Buffalo Club in Buffalo, NY. The event was hosted by Belmont Abbey College, a great Benedictine college in North Carolina..

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. -Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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New Way of the Cross

Abbot Barnabas Senecal, OSB, blessed the new Stations of the Cross north of the St. Benedict's Abbey Cemetery Aug. 4, 2007. Our novice Br. Leven and Andy Soukup started the project which was completed with the help of the Brazilian monks while were here.

...we may by patience share in the sufferings of Christ, and be found worthy to be coheirs with Him of His kingdom. -Conclusion of the Prologue to the Rule of Saint Benedict

125th Knights of Columbus Supreme Convention on EWTN

EWTN The Eternal Word Television Network (EWTN), Salt & Light Television (Canada), and Sirius Satellite Radio’s The Catholic Channel will each provide coverage from the Knights of Columbus 125th Supreme Convention Aug. 7-9, 2007 in Nashville, Tn. Knights are encouraged to tune in to convention coverage via television, radio or the Internet.

Pope Benedict XVI on Monsignor Luigi Giussani

He was always the faithful servant of the Holy Father and his bishops. His legacy is a new way of thinking about the Church: Communion and Liberation.

Travels with Bishop Herbert

Bishop Herbert Hermes, OSB, is a monk of our Abbey and Bishop of Cristalandia, Brazil. He and I spent the last two weeks visiting family and friends in Colorado and Kansas. We had a nice visit with Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M., Cap. in Denver, and Bishop Michael Sheridan in Colorado Springs. We also saw family and friends in Lamar, Co, and Leoti, Scott City, and Wichita, Ks.

Bishop Herbert’s Prelacy (pre-Diocese) in Brazil is the size of Iowa. For 17 years he has labored among the people. Please keep him in your prayers.

Steve Tasker to the Buffalo Bills Wall of Fame

On September 9, Steve Tasker’s name will be added to the Wall of Fame of the Buffalo Bills. He will join such noted players and coaches as Jack Kemp, Jim Kelly, and Marv Levy. Steve and his wife Sara are the parents of five children, and have been generous in their support of Ravens Respect Life at Benedictine College. On that day Tasker will also be one of the announcers of Buffalo’s home opener against Denver for CBS Sports.

Also please remember Steve’s father, the Rev. Gordon Tasker in your prayers. He is a retired Methodist minister living in Winfield, Ks who just had a heart attack this past Friday. Bishop Herbert and I were able to visit with him at the Kansas Heart Hospital in Wichita on Saturday morning.

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.

-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Father Bernard Gervais, OSB,

Father Bernard died on Saturday night, July 14, 2007, fortified by the Sacraments and prayers of the Church. Father Bernard had been a monk of Holy Cross Abbey, Canon City, CO, until that community closed, at which time he became a monk of St. Benedict’s Abbey. Father Bernard celebrated his 60th year of ordination in 2004. He had served 10 years as chaplain at St. Joseph's Hospital in Denver and 10 years at Fitzsimons Army Hospital. Before these assignments, he had been pastor in Boulder and in Pueblo, Co, had served three times as business manager for Holy Cross Abbey and School, and had coached football and prefected in the high school. The Vigil for Father Bernard will be on Friday at 7 PM in the Abbey Church. His Mass of Christian Burial will be on Saturday at 10:30 AM, also in the Abbey Church.

Latest on Vern Ostdiek (Received Wednesday afternoon)
Vern Ostdiek (Professor of Physics at Benedictine College) underwent neurosurgery on Monday to remove a brain tumor. Results of the operation are that the cancerous tumor could not be completely removed. Vern is recovering in the hospital and could be released as early as today. He’ll be staying with friends during his recovery and his doctors are assessing the next step. Please keep him in your prayers.
Travels

I leave for out west today:
I will speak about St. Benedict and the monks, and sisters arrival in Kansas at the Theology Institute, Diocese of Wichita. The Institute goes from Thursday (this evening) through Saturday. The main presenter is Dr. Thomas Woods, author of many books and articles, including How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization.
Saturday evening: Communion and Liberation gathering in Wichita.
Sunday, Salina, meet Bishop Herbert Hermes, OSB (Monk of the Abbey, Bishop of Cristalandia, Brazil) and go with him to visit family and friends in Colorado, and western Kansas. I should be checking e-mail during this time.
August 6, Feast of the Transfiguration, arrive back at the Abbey

CL in Connecticut
The Communion & Liberation (CL) Catholic lay movement in Connecticut is sponsoring a book presentation on Msgr. Luigi Giussani's The Journey to Truth is an Experience. This is the book the world-wide CL members are currently working on in the weekly catechetical meetings called the School of Community. The details:

When: 17 September 2007
Time: 7pm
Where: Saint Thomas More Chapel center, Park Street, New Haven (Yale University)
Who: Fr Antonio Lopez* (JPII Institute, Washington, DC) and Dr Giuseppe Mazzotta** (Yale University)

*Fr. Antonio López, F.S.C.B. (Priestly Fraternity of St. Charles Borromeo) Assistant Professor of Theology at the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family. Father Antonio completed his doctorate in theology at Boston College in 2002. Since then, his research has been centered around foundational themes in systematic and Trinitarian theology, with particular attention to the dialogue between modern and post-modern philosophers and theologians and the tradition of the Church. Fr. López’s work focuses on the category of gift for an elucidation of sacramental theology and for an understanding of God, absolute love which in Christ reveals himself as a communion of persons. His most recent work, Spirit’s Gift: The Metaphysical Insight of Claude Bruaire, was published by CUA Press.

**Giuseppe Mazzotta, is the Chairman of the Department of Italian at Yale University, and is the Sterling Professor of Humanities for Italian. He has written a number of essays about every century of Italian literary history. His books include: Dante, Poet of the Desert: History and Allegory in the Divine Comedy (Princeton, 1979); The World at Play in Boccaccio's Decameron (Princeton, 19 86); Dante's Vision and the Circle of Knowledge (Princeton, 1993); The Worlds of Petrarch (Duke UP, 193); The New Map of the World: the Poetic Philosophy of Giambattista Vico (Princeton, 1998); Cosmopoiesis: The Renaissance Experim ent (Toronto UP, 2001. He has also edited or co-edited several books, such as Critical Essays on Dante (Hall, 1991) and Master Regis (Fordham UP, 1985), etc.

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. -Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.

-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Prayer requests

Pope Benedict XVI on CL

Travels

Prayers

Father Bernard Gervais, OSB, died on Saturday night, July 14, 2007, fortified by the Sacraments and prayers of the Church. Father Bernard had been a monk of Holy Cross Abbey, Canon City, CO, until that community closed, at which time he became a monk of St. Benedict’s Abbey. Father Bernard celebrated his 60th year of ordination in 2004. He had served 10 years as chaplain at St. Joseph's Hospital in Denver and 10 years at Fitzsimons Army Hospital. Before these assignments, he had been pastor in Boulder and in Pueblo, Co, had served three times as business manager for Holy Cross Abbey and School, and had coached football and prefected in the high school. The Vigil for Father Bernard will be on Friday at 7 PM in the Abbey Church. His Mass of Christian Burial will be on Saturday at 10:30 AM, also in the Abbey Church.

(Manuela worked in my parents café in Leoti. Please remember her soul in your prayers.)

Manuela Rodriquez, 76, of St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Leoti, died May 28, 2007. She also worked at Miller’s Cafe and was a housekeeper. Survivors include seven sons, Cornelio Vallejo, Joe Vallejo, Sam Vallejo, Juan Vallejo, Mario Vallejo, David Vallejo, and Checko Vallejo; seven stepsons, Johnny, David, Pete, Paul, Mike, Freddie and Gary Rodriquez; one daughter, Ortensia Gonzales; a stepdaughter, Theresa Rodriquez,; two brothers, Antonio Gonzales and Cruz Gonzales; two sisters, Venita Martinez and Semona De Vero; 37 grandchildren; 31 great-grandchildren; 21 step-grandchildren; and 15 step-great-grandchildren. Father Benjamin Martin presided at the Mass of Christian Burial at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church, Leoti, KS.

Vern Ostdiek, a Professor of Physics at Benedictine College was hospitalized Sunday night; tests have revealed a brain tumor. He underwent neurosurgery at noon today (Monday) at Heartland Hospital in St. Joseph. Please keep him in your prayers at this very critical time in his life.

Pope Benedict XVI on Communion and Liberation

Ratzinger

A New Beginning
Part of the complete text of the interview with Cardinal Ratzinger for the documentary on the fiftieth anniversary of CL, transmitted by Rai Uno(the main Italian public service television channel) on September 10th. “On one hand, a firm fidelity to the essence of the Catholic Church and, on the other hand, a spontaneity, a freedom that offers new realizations of this faith”
edited by Roberto Fontolan

You know the experience of Communion and Liberation well. What does it represent in the life and reality of the Church today? What contribution can it offer?
Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) “Naturally, one could “take refuge” in the word “movements,” which is an indicator for interpreting this reality. With Communion and Liberation, a communitarian realization of the faith is born, which , as I have said, does not arise from the existing structures, is not created by an organizational idea on the part of the hierarchy, but is born of an experience of faith, of a renewed encounter with Christ and, thus, we can say, of an impulse that comes ultimately from the Holy Spirit and is inserted as a free reality, open to all in the Church as a whole. And it offers itself as a way of living the Christian faith deeply and in step with the times. A reality like this certainly has precedents in history but, as such, it is new and must naturally look for its place in the context of the Church: on one hand, with the hierarchy, with the parishes, with the basic Church structures; on the other hand, with society. It seems to me that the great contribution of CL comes above all from the fact that it is a movement that carries a great human, theological, but even general culture; a movement that brings a catholic expression of culture to fertilize our present-day culture, and also offers a theology, rethought by a Christological event, faithful to the great constants of the Catholic tradition but renewed in the present-day cultural world and, particularly, in the world of the university. Thus, there is, on one hand, this important element: a firm fidelity to the essence of the Catholic Church, that is to say, to the apostolic and episcopal structure of the Church in communion with the Holy Father, and therefore to the pastors who are the government of the Church; and, on the other hand, a spontaneity, a freedom that offers new realizations of this faith.

My Travels

I was just in St. Louis at the New Cathedral for a wedding on Saturday; and a Baptism at St. Francis DeSales Oratory on Sunday. I also saw many friends and alumni of the college.
This coming weekend I will be teaching at the Theology Institute for the Diocese of Wichita.
The following two weeks (Until August 6) I will be driving Bishop Herbert Hermes, OSB, a monk of the Abbey who is Bishop of Cristalandia, Brazil, out to see family and friends in Colorado and Kansas. Bishop Herbert’s Prelacy is the size of Iowa. He has a number of men in the seminary, and has ordained a number of priests in recent years. If you would like to contribute to the work of Bishop Herbert, you can send a donation to:
CRISTALANDIA MISSION
Bishop Herbert Hermes, OSB
c/o Norbert Hermes
3348 N. Muir Rd.
Salina, KS 67401

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Sr. Lorena Bolte, O.P. RIP

Channel 2 coverage of our Festival of Faith

FOCUS commissioning Mass

Wisdom of Monsignor Luigi Giussani

May Sr. Lorena rest in peace. Our prayers are with the Dominican Sisters in Great Bend, Ks.
Great Bend, KS – July 5, 2007—The entire Dominican Family mourns the loss of Sister Lorena Bolte OP, 58, prioress of the Dominican Sisters of Great Bend, KS who died Wednesday, July 4, 2007, in a car accident near Syracuse KS.

Sister Lorena was chairperson of Region XIII of LCWR (Leadership Conference of Women Religious), served on other national boards of religious and justice topics (e.g., the Africa Faith and Justice Network), and was active in RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) in Prince of Peace Parish in Great Bend KS, and taught on the diocesan ITV series. She attended national meetings of the Dominican Leadership Conference, and leadership team meetings of the Dominican Alliance (13 Dominican women’s congregations) and the Dominican Cluster (7 Dominican women’s congregations).
She was Dominican to the core – loving prayer, study, community, and ministry – especially the Dominican charism of preaching. She was an avid gardener who liked houseplants around her and grew great vegetables as well. She will be especially grieved by the all the members of the Cluster congregations and the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena of Gusau, Nigeria.

Born January 27, 1949, in Nelson NE, as Marie Bolte, Sister Lorena was the daughter of Bernice Kathman Bolte and the late Lawrence Bolte. She entered the Dominican Sisters’ Community August 26, 1965, and pronounced her first vows June 13, 1968. She celebrated 25 years of religious profession in 1993.

Sister Lorena was an instructor at Luckey High School in Manhattan KS from 1972 - 1974. She ministered in Nigeria, West Africa, in several capacities from 1975 - 1995. She was a teacher, formation director for the indigenous congregation of the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena of Gusau, Nigeria (a foundation of the Dominican Sisters of Great Bend), and later its major superior. She served in Goodland KS as a pastoral minister for Our Lady of Perpetual Help parish from 1998 - 2002. Following her ministry in Goodland, she was Assistant Prioress of the Great Bend Dominicans for four years and at the time of her death was Prioress of the Dominican Sisters of Great Bend.

Sister Lorena' body will be brought to the Dominican Sisters’ Motherhouse, 3600 Broadway, Great Bend, at 4:00 p.m. Friday, July 6, 2007, where it will lie in state until the Liturgy of Christian Burial at 1:30 p.m. Monday, July 9, 2007, with Most Rev. Ronald M Gilmore, Bishop of the Diocese of Dodge City, presiding. A wake service will be held at 7 p.m. Sunday, July 8, 2007. Burial will be in the Sisters’ Resurrection Cemetery.

Representatives of the Dominican Leadership Conference will attend her memorial along with many other Dominicans.

Sister Lorena is survived by her mother, Bernice; two brothers, William (Bill) of Central City NE and James of Lawrence NE; and three sisters, Elizabeth (Betty) Daake of Riverdale NE, Alice Buser of Kearney NE, and Lora Messbarger of Kearney NE.

Memorials in honor of Sister Lorena may be sent to: Dominican Sisters Ministry Fund, Office of Mission and Ministry, 3600 Broadway, Great Bend, KS 67530-3692.

Atchison Monks Keep Communities Tied Together

Reported by: Nathan Byrne
Channel 2 News, St. Joseph, Mo
Thursday, Jul 5, 2007 @08:19pm

St. Benedict's Abbey has made many connections in 150 years. The monks continue to keep communities in northeast Kansas tied together:

Father James Albers sings the praises of St. Benedict's Abbey in Atchison, Kan.

"I really haven't known anything other than the Benedictines in my faith life," Albers said. "When it came time to discern where I would enter into my religious vocation, there was really no choice, the Benedictines were it."
But the connection started long before Albers joined the monastery. It goes all the way back to his great-great-great-grandparents and hasn't stopped since.
"My family's been connected with the Benedictines here in Atchison from day one and so there's just that familiarity all along," said Albers. "I think my family would consider themselves Benedictines in that sense."
The Benedictine family extends even further, Larry Buessing's great-grandfather and his grandfather helped the monks build a church in St. Benedict, Kan.
"My grandfather was a little boy, he led the horses that raised the rock for the masons to put in that church," said Buessing.

Father Denis Meade finds foundation on common ground.

"This was 150 years in existence for many of these parishes on Highway 36, the Pony Express Highway, because our community and these parish communities were born simultaneously," said Meade.
The tradition started in the 1850s, when the monks made their way through northeast Kansas sharing their sense of community.
"When we're out serving people, I don't think we can leave the sense of who we are behind, so we bring that with us and naturally want to share it," Albers said. "We just don't check it at the door when we leave, we take it out with us."
St. Benedict's Abbey invites members of the parishes it has served for more than 150 years, and all other friends, to a "Festival of Faith". The mass is Sunday (tomorrow) at 2 p.m. in St. Benedict's Abbey Church.
Note: While many parishes will be here for our Festival of Faith, feel free to come on your own and join in the celebration of our 150th anniversary. The celebrant will be Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, from St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, PA.)

Archbishop Naumann celebrates commissioning Mass
For the Fellowship of Catholic University Students
Yesterday (Friday) Archbishop Joseph Naumann of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas celebrated a Noon Mass in the Guadalupe Chapel of the Abbey Church. During that Mass he commissioned the FOCUS leaders from all over the United States for the coming year. Afterward he took time to eat lunch with the new FOCUS team for Benedictine College and the regional coordinator for FOCUS, Greg Doring. Having the FOCUS training here on the campus of Benedictine College has been a real blessing for us.

Reflections of Monsignor Luigi Giussani, Founder of Communion and Liberation

This conversion to Christ, the “knowing” of Christ and this love of Christ,” this knowing “nothing...except Jesus Christ and Him crucified,” this living that is no longer a living ourselves. But a living of Christ, who is in us, who died for me and gave Himself in sacrifice for me- “yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me; insofar as I now live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God who has loved me and given Himself up for me.” - is the fruit, as the light and fulfillment, the consciousness and the energy of accomplishment, of the Spirit of Christ in us. It is He who transforms us and “continually renews the aspect of our land, the face of our life”

(Fr. Meinrad’s Note: This reminds me of the Second Reading for the Sunday Mass of July 8, 2007. In part, St. Paul in concluding his Letter to the Galatians, wrote:
May I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ,
through which the world has been crucified to me,
and I to the world. )

What liberates the world is our change, nothing else. What change? The change that is the realization of the structure of the Church, that is, of the Body of Christ, and this alone.

The supreme fruit of the Spirit is the awareness of mercy, the consciousness of oneself as forgiven, and the memory of Christ as forgiveness (dead and risen); it is the ever-greater evidence of forgiveness as the renewal of life, as the conversion of life, as life that changes.

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. -Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.

-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Festival of Faith

Hopefully we will see many of you here for our Festival of Faith, this Sunday, July 8, at 2 PM in the Abbey Church. Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D., the Archabbot of St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa will be the celebrant and homilist of the Mass at 2 PM. Visiting priests are welcome to concelebrate this Mass. Bring some friends along to Atchison for the afternoon to celebrate with us.

REAP

Next weekend Paul Masek, a BC graduate and one time postulant here at the Abbey will be speaking at the Steubenville Conference in Springfield, Mo. He is writing a new book, Stirring it Up.

Once, when asked about his own teenage years, Paul Masek described himself as having been “every mother’s nightmare”. As a young teen, he often felt lost and confused. Late in his teen years, however, Paul made a commitment to Jesus Christ, and that decision changed his live forever.

A 1985 graduate of Benedictine College, Paul had plans to teach high school English – but God had other plans for his life. After a short period of discernment in St. Benedict’s Abbey in Atchison, Kansas, Paul moved back to St. Louis and began his youth ministry career, which eventually led him to form the REAP Team, the ministry that he still coordinates. Since its inception in 1989, the REAP Team has reached over 150,000 people (mostly teenagers) with the life-changing message of God’s love. Paul is blessed to meet and share the Gospel with over 10,000 teenagers every year.

In addition to his work in youth ministry, Paul loves the outdoors – hunting, fishing, and camping. He is married to his lovely bride Lisa, and has four awesome children – Jacob, Audrey, Kyle, and Dominic.

Man, Measure of All Things
Without God, no Longer Has Any Measure


During the General Chapter of our Monastic Congregation Father Thomas Acklin, OSB, S.T.D., Ph.D, mentioned the good work of Michael Waldstein, the President of International Theological Institute in Gaming, Austria. Waldstein wrote the following for the December, 2004 Traces, The magazine of Communion and Liberation.

In our pursuit of health and long life through the means provided by the scientific and medical establishment, we can spot the traits of Gnosticism, an ancient Christian heresy, and of the modern claim to an unlimited dominion over reality: the body a prison to escape from, and reality empty of meaning, to be manipulated as we please. The outcome is tragic: the incapacity of all human power to save man from himself gives rise to nihilism and violence
What can Christians do in this situation? What the Church did in the early centuries: witness that reality is not empty of meaning. God has chosen to become one of us, with a body amongst other bodies. “The Christian finds a positive answer in the fact that God has become man; this is the event that surprises and comforts what would otherwise be a misfortune” (Fr Giussani), and so defends the inexorable positivity of reality by Michael Waldstein*

History, according to a well-known proverb, repeats itself. In our pursuit of health and long life through the means provided by the scientific and medical establishment, we relate to the world and to our bodies in a manner strikingly similar to the first Christian heresy, ancient Gnosticism.

According to Hans Urs von Balthasar, even the bloodiest persecutions suffered by the early Church were a small danger compared with Gnosticism. Many Gnostic groups continued to live within the Church. They understood themselves as “true” Christians, as the “spiritual” elect, superior to the “fleshly” or “psychic” ordinary believers. In one of the most important Gnostic texts, the Apocryphon of John, Jesus comes down after His ascension to reveal the true secrets of the world to His beloved disciple John. The main mystery He teaches him is that the creator of the visible world worshiped by the Jews and ordinary Christians is the devil (called Yaldabaoth). There is a purely spiritual world above the material cosmos.

Jews and ordinary Christians know nothing about this higher world. The creator-devil Yaldabaoth does have some understanding of the spiritual world. His goal is to capture spiritual substance of the higher world in the human body in order to increase his own power and glory. The body is a prison constructed by the devil to imprison the spiritual self that is originally part of a divine world. Sexual intercourse is the main means by which Yaldabaoth establishes his rule. The sexual order originated in the rape of Eve by Yaldabaoth. “Then Yaldabaoth saw the virgin (Eve) who stood by Adam. He was full of ignorance so that he wanted to raise up a seed from her. He defiled her and begot the first child and similarly the second: Yahweh, the bear face, and Eloim, the cat face. Up to the present day sexual intercourse of marriage continued because of the Chief Ruler (Yaldabaoth). In Adam he planted sexual desire.” (Codex Berolinensis Gnosticus 8502, 62,3-63,6).

Sex is from the devil. The consequence of sex, having children, is the most important part of the devil’s plan, because each child is a new imprisonment of heavenly spiritual substance in a body. Rebellion against the devil, the prince of this world, means rebellion against sexual passion. It also means rebellion against procreation. The refusal to procreate is an essential element in the struggle for liberation.

Masters and possessors of nature

Apart from the contraceptive ideology of the Gnostics, their attitude about sex seems rather the opposite of the easy-going love of sexual pleasure characteristic of our culture. Yet cultural analysis must probe deeper. The roots of our contemporary scientific-technological culture lie above all in two seminal thinkers of the Englightenment, Francis Bacon and René Descartes. According to Bacon, the learning of the Greeks and Scholastics is like a boy: it can talk, but it cannot generate; it is fruitful in controversies, but not fruitful for gaining power over nature and thereby improving the human condition. Knowledge exists for the sake of power. This is the goal we should strive for. According to Descartes, “it is possible to reach knowledge that will be of much utility in this life; and instead of the speculative philosophy which is now taught in the schools [ie, scholastic philosophy] we can find a practical one, by which, knowing the nature and behavior of fire, water, air, stars, the heavens, and all the other bodies which surround us we can employ these entities for all the purposes for which they are suited, and so make ourselves masters and possessors of nature” (Discourse on Method, 6).

Masters and possessors of nature: Bacon’s and Descartes’ ambition for power over nature was not small-souled, but a grand ambition. We can make ourselves masters and possessors of nature. Even the heavens and the stars will serve us. Far-reaching progress in science and technology is pre-programmed in this ambitious vision.
The impact of the ambition for power on the knowledge of nature was massive and far-reaching. Both Bacon and Descartes reject the ancient principle that nature acts for an end. Pre-given ends in nature are, in fact, an obstacle for the one who wants to use nature for his or her own ends. “Seek knowledge, and knowledge will give you power. But it would be more accurate to say that the new science sought first power over nature and, derivatively, found a way to reconceive nature that yielded the empowering kind of knowledge: Seek power, and you will devise a way of knowing that gives it to you” (Leon Kass).

Escape from reality

Descartes conceived of nature as mere “res extensa.” The world is a mechanism without meaning and purpose of its own. The proper use of this world is to subject it completely to human purposes. Here one can see the point of contact with Gnosticism. The Gnostics experienced the world as a hellish place, created, ruled, and occupied by a powerful creator, the devil. Salvation meant escape from this terror. The Cartesian universe is not a hellish place, but an indifferent one. It is neither a demonic nor a truly hospitable place, congenial with the interests of the person. It is mere matter that must and can be used in whatever way we see fit. The Jewish philosopher Hans Jonas argues rightly that the modern alienation of human beings from their mechanistic universe is even greater than the alienation of the Gnostics from their hellish prison. “There is no overlooking one ordinal difference between the Gnostic and the existentialist dualism: Gnostic man is thrown into an antagonistic, anti-divine, and therefore anti-human nature, modern man into an indifferent one. Only the latter case represents the absolute vacuum, the really bottomless pit. This makes modern nihilism infinitely more radical and more desperate than Gnostic nihilism could ever be for all its panic terror of the world.”

Nihilism and violence

Nihilism and violence belong together, as Dostoevsky shows in his novels, especially Crime and Punishment. This is perfectly reasonable. If there is no meaning in that which I subject to my power (this is nihilist premise), there can be no limit to my power. This final conclusion deeply characterizes the manner in which the scientific and medical establishment pursues its progress. What people want most of all is pre-given to the technological establishment as an end. The most commonly desired end in our culture is health, prolonging one’s life. Since the people who have money pursue this end, the medical establishment, following free market principles, follows their desire and works for their end in whatever manner it can. As a matter of principle, there can be no limit in the way the end is pursued, except the rights of other persons who are able to claim and defend their right. Those who are still weak, like embryos, are left without defense. They can be produced and used for medical therapy.

Again Hans Jonas’s insight is penetrating. “Bacon’s formula says that knowledge is power. Now the Baconian program by itself, that is, under its own management, has at the height of its triumph revealed its insufficiency in the lack of control over itself, thus the impotence of its power to save not only man from himself but also nature from man. Bacon did not anticipate this profound paradox of the power derived from knowledge: that it leads indeed to some sort of domination over nature (ie, her intensified utilization), but at the same time to the most complete subjugation under itself. The power has become self-acting, while its promise has turned into threat, its prospect of salvation into apocalypse.”

Reality is filled with meaning

What is it that Christians can do in this situation, in which the person is more deeply alienated from the material cosmos than the Gnostics could ever be, in which it seems impossible to stop the self-generated momentum of technological power, in which Christianity becomes more and more marginalized, considered intellectually backward by the scientific establishment and morally offensive by the political power aligned with this establishment? They can do what the Catholic Church did in that first major crisis of its intellectual and spiritual life, the Gnostic heresy.
They can reaffirm the goodness of the material world with joy. The material world is not empty of meaning. It is filled with meaning. “The Word became flesh and dwells among us and we see His glory” (Jn 1,14). God chose to become one of us, with a body among bodies. The event of His self-revelation takes place in the body. This event in flesh and blood makes it possible for us to encounter Him.

This was the answer the Church gave to Gnosticism almost two thousand years ago. It is the answer we can give today to this deeper and more desperate Gnosticism characteristic of the scientific and political establishment.
* Michael Waldstein is the President of the International Theological Institute in Gaming, Austria. He has a doctorate degree in philosophy from the University of Dallas, and a Doctorate in New Testament studies from Harvard University.

___________________________________________________

A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.

-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu

bell ringing in the news and views







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



I received the following link from Santiago (Santi) Ramos, a 2007 graduate of Rockhurst University with a degree in Philosophy. He, his parents, and his brother and sister are part of our Communion and Liberation group in the Kansas City area. Santi sent me the link to the following article in First Things. It’s very good reading.

The Founding Fathers were neither metaphysicians nor theologians, but their philosophy of life, and their political philosophy, their notion of natural law and of human rights, were permeated with concepts worked out by Christian reason and backed up by an unshakeable religious feeling.

http://www.firstthings.com/article.php3?id_article=473&var_recherche=Novak+founding http://www.firstthings.com/article.php3?id_article=473&var_recherche=Novak+founding

Santi’s father is Mario Ramos Reyes. According to a blurb on the Yale University Law school page, Mario is a scholar and diplomat, was Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Catholic University of Paraguay from 1985 to 1989. He received his B.A. in Philosophy in 1982 and J.D. in 1984 from the Catholic University of Paraguay. He earned a M.A in 1995 and Ph.D. in 1996 from the University of Kansas. He also holds a Diploma in Special Studies of Philosophy of Law from the University of Navarra, Spain.

He was the first Consul General of the Republic of Paraguay to the State of Kansas (1998-2000).
He now holds the post of Emeritus Consul to the State of Kansas.
He has published a number of articles on Latin American philosophy, the Christian Democratic movement, and the Catholic Social Teaching
He has published two books Philosophy and Democratic Thought (1998); and Ethics and Philosophy (2005).
His new book, Jacques Maritain: the Search for a Christian Political Order in Latin America, is scheduled for publication next year.

Member of the Paraguayan Institute of Constitutional Law, Mario is currently Associate Professor of Philosophy at Washburn University-KCKCC, State of Kansas and visiting Professor of the Catholic University of Asunción.

___________________________________________________
A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.

-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, -James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



I asked Jack Cashill to speak at our Benedictine College Ravens Respect Life day at Ascension Parish in Overland Park in the fall of 2001. He is always insightful. The following article is a great one, especially on this Fourth of July, when we consider what our civic duty is to the unborn.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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'Good Kansans' enable abortionist to stay in business
Jack Cashill
Posted: July 2, 2007
1:00 a.m. Eastern

The Rotarians of Johnson County, the most prosperous and populous county in Kansas, are solid citizens and good Kansans.

They work hard, raise their kids responsibly, volunteer for any number of good causes, vote largely Republican and begin their weekly meetings with the Pledge of Allegiance.

And yet last November, a majority of them voted to keep the notorious Wichita abortionist, Dr. George Tiller, in business. To be sure, they did not think of their vote in those terms.

As the Kansas City Star told them, and the Johnson County Sun, and all the local TV stations that take their cue from the Star, and even the local talk radio guys who follow Rush and Sean, incumbent Attorney General Phill Kline had to go.

Kline was a zealot, a "theocrat," who was trawling through the private medical records of innocent young women in the hope of spearing his own ideological white whale, the law-abiding Tiller.

Through various PACs and cut-out, Tiller invested several hundred thousands of his own dollars to reinforce the "Snoop Dog Kline" message.

Fortunately for Kansas – or so the media told the Rotarians – popular Johnson County District Attorney Paul Morison heard the outcry of the people, switched parties to run as a Democrat and stopped the "out-of-control" Kline in his tracks.

Last week I spoke at a Johnson County Rotary Club. I was invited in my role as executive editor of the regional business magazine, Ingram's.

Not wanting to embarrass my host, I sought and got clearance in advance for my topic: Namely, why Kansas, the reddest of red states, has emerged as the world capital of late-term abortions.

I do not exaggerate here. Girls and young women from all 49 states and most European countries have followed their own yellow brick roads to the abortionist behind the curtain in Wichita.

In a recent front-page column in the Johnson County Sun, Morrison-backer Steve Rose acknowledged Tiller's boast that he has "more experience in late abortion services with fetuses over 24 weeks than anywhere else in the Western Hemisphere, more than 60,000 since 1973."

What Rose did not say is that, for the last 10 years at least, nearly every one of these abortions has made a mockery of Kansas state law.

Rotary Clubs are not used to hearing talks on abortion politics. One fellow walked out in something of a huff. Most of the other 50 or so in attendance politely avoided me at talk's end.

But a good half-dozen men were effusive in their thanks. They had never heard someone address the subject in an open discussion. And that is precisely the problem. Tiller's allies monopolize the major media.

In the age of the Internet, however, the media cannot quiet all dissent. Pro-life groups have kept a steady pressure on Morrison and, in June, made his life all the more uncomfortable when they brought Dr. Paul McHugh to Kansas.

Before leaving office, Kline had contracted with the impeccably credentialed psychiatrist to review the Tiller files to see if they honored Kansas law. They apparently did not.

When asked whether he had seen any one file among the 15 in question that justified a late-term abortion on the basis of "substantial and irreversible impairment of a major bodily function," physical or mental, McHugh unequivocally responded, "I saw no file that justified abortion on that basis."

He was confident too that "100 percent" of his fellow psychiatrists would agree that these cases showed no sign of irreversible damage.

After six months of irresolution on the charges against Tiller that Kline had pressed before leaving office, Morrison chose Thursday afternoon, June 28, to announce their disposition.

This was a classic news dump. That morning the immigration bill had died in the U.S. Senate and sucked all the air out of the conservative media. Morrison dropped his announcement into the vacuum.

His press conference was stunningly ugly and disingenuous. He spent the greater part of it promoting his own record and attacking Kline for a wide variety of offenses, all of them either imagined or irrelevant.

Morrison noted how "ironic" it was that Kline did not file charges until the end of his term, "all the while knowing that I [Morrison] would have to deal with that."

As Morison knew, however, it was not Kline who manufactured the irony, but Tiller. He and his allies had fought for two years to keep the medical records away from prying eyes until the courts finally decided for Kline.

As Morrison surely suspected, Tiller had much to hide. But the way Morrison interpreted the relevant statute, it did not matter whether a woman actually faced death or impairment as long as two financially and legally unaffiliated doctors said she did.

This nuancing of the law allowed Morrison to showily dismiss all of the charges Kline had brought and ridicule Kline for bringing them.

Lest he be accused of a total whitewash, Morrison had to charge Tiller with something. And so he noted that the two doctors sanctioning the abortions – Tiller himself and a Dr. Kristin Neuhaus – were, in fact, affiliated, and this relationship "thwarts the letter of that statute."

Morrison seemed to be following the game plan leaked to the Sun's Steve Rose a few weeks earlier: File a few misdemeanor charges, suggest a modest fine and call Kline's "witch hunt" off.

"Unless the Kansas Legislature changes its law," Rose added, "Dr. Tiller can continue [late-term viable abortions] every day of the week, as well as other late term abortion techniques."

The Star, winner of Planned Parenthood's national "Maggie" award, bought the strategy. "Doctors must scrupulously follow the law," its editorialists comically opined.

They praised Morrison's "honesty and respect for the law" and heaped even more scorn on Kline given the "disturbing details" Morrison revealed about his work.

But Tiller did not get to be a stone-cold abortionist in a deep red state by being stupid. Both he and Neuhaus are denying a financial affiliation. This is likely true. Apparently, the wily Tiller her did not pay Neuhaus for her opinion. The patients did directly.

"I think [Morrison] is making a strained interpretation of the law," said Neuhaus's attorney.

And while the lawyers dicker anew, Tiller continues to mock Kansas law by killing perfectly healthy, viable babies for reasons no more serious than a girl's anxiety about missing her prom or a rock concert.

"I had to ask myself," said McHugh of Tiller's clinic, "is any person ever found to be not appropriate on psychological grounds for an abortion?"

The prominent mental health experts, Tiller and Neuhaus, evidently did not think so.

In watching all of this take place, I have to ask myself whether we judged too harshly those "Good Germans," who turned a blind eye to Nazi inhumanities. In Kansas, we don't even have a Gestapo to explain our passivity.

Still, I expect more of our Rotarians. And I remain hopeful that they will deliver.

Jack Cashill is an Emmy-award winning independent writer and producer with a Ph.D. in American Studies from Purdue.

___________________________________________________ A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath,
-James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Fourth of July

Festival of Faith at the Abbey this Sunday

Knights of Columbus: podcasting the Kingdom

Sister Mary Ellen remembers the monks in Brazil

BC has a new Baseball coach

Fourth of July
For you were called for freedom, brothers. But do not use this freedom as an opportunity for the flesh; rather, serve one another through love. Galatians 5, 13
Happy Fourth of July tomorrow!

Festival of Faith
Hopefully we will see many of you here for our Festival of Faith, this Sunday, July 8, at 2 PM in the Abbey Church. Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D.***, the Archabbot of St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa will be the celebrant and homilist of the Mass at 2 PM. Visiting priests are welcome to concelebrate this Mass. Bring some friends along to Atchison for the afternoon to celebrate with us.

The words of Pope John Paul II to the Benedictine monks of Subiaco, Italy in 1999 on the occasion 1,500th anniversary of being founded by Saint Benedict ring true for us today:

May every Benedictine community present itself with a well-defined identity, like a "city on a hill", distinct from the surrounding world, but open and welcoming to the poor, to pilgrims and to all who are searching for a life of greater fidelity to the Gospel!
-Pope John Paul II

***The Right Reverend Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. is eleventh Archabbot of Saint Vincent Archabbey and Chancellor of Saint Vincent College and Seminary, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, and the Major Superior of the Benedictines at the Priory and Benedictine Military School in Savannah, Georgia, and the Benedictine Priories in Brazil and Taiwan.

Archabbot Douglas attended Catholic grade schools at Saint Joseph, Everson, and Holy Cross, Youngwood, Pennsylvania. He earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Philosophy from Saint Vincent College in May of 1968, a Master of Divinity from Saint Vincent Seminary in May of 1971 and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Tennessee in December of 1977.

He was professed as a Benedictine on July 11, 1966, and ordained to the priesthood at the Archabbey Basilica on May 21, 1972 by the late Bishop William G. Connare of Greensburg. He was elected by his fellow monks on January 8, 1991 to become the eleventh Archabbot of Saint Vincent. On March 1, 1991, he received the Abbatial Blessing from Anthony G. Bosco, Bishop of Greensburg.

Prior to his election as Archabbot, Archabbot Douglas had served for
five years as Secretary for Education of the Diocese of Pittsburgh from 1986 to 1991
Pastor of Our Lady, Queen of Peace Parish, North Side, Pittsburgh from 1984 to 1986.

At Saint Vincent College he served as
Chairman of the Department of Psychology from 1979 to 1984
Associate Academic Dean from 1983 to 1984.
From 1978 through 1983, he was also a member of the staff in the Behavioral Science Department at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.
He also served as a psychological consultant to Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood for a number of years.

Archabbot Douglas is a member of
the Board of Trustees of the McFeely-Rogers Foundation
the Extra Mile Education Foundation
Saint Vincent College and Seminary Board of Incorporators
Saint Vincent College Board of Directors
the Board of Directors of the Benedictine Military School in Savannah, Georgia.

During his years as Secretary of Education in the Diocese of Pittsburgh, he also served as a member of
the Saint Anthony School for Exceptional Children Board of Directors
the DePaul Institute Board of Directors.

He also serves as a member of the International Benedictine Commission on China.

In his role as the Archabbot of Saint Vincent Archabbey, Archabbot Douglas serves as the spiritual leader of the first Benedictine monastery established in the United States and one of the largest monasteries in the world. The Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey operate the Benedictine Military School in Savannah, Georgia, and the Penn State Campus Ministry Program at State College in Pennsylvania. In addition to his responsibilities in this country, Archabbot Douglas is also the spiritual leader of monasteries in Brazil and Taiwan. The Benedictine monks of Saint Vincent Archabbey founded the original Fu Jen University in Beijing, the first Catholic University in China, in the 1920s. Today the Benedictines have a priory in Taiwan and teach at Fu Jen University in Taipei. The Benedictine Community recently opened a new school, Colegio Sao Bento, in Vinhedo, Brazil.

In 1992 Archabbot Douglas was named “Man of the Year in Religion” by the Pittsburgh Vectors Society and in 1995 received an honorary doctorate from Saint Vincent College. In the fall of 1999 he received an honorary degree from Fu Jen University in Taiwan, Republic of China.

The son of Sylvester and the late Evelyn (Jackamonis) Nowicki, he was born in Everson, Pennsylvania on May 8, 1945. He is one of four children. He has two brothers, Edward Nowicki of Greensburg and Lawrence Nowicki of Harrisburg, and a sister, Mrs. Dean Sickenberger of Greensburg.

Knights of Columbus Catholic Information
The Catholic Information Service of the Knights of Columbus has recently launched a podcast version of the popular Luke E. Hart course. Luke E. Hart series, written by Peter Kreeft, gives an introduction to the Catechism of the Catholic Church in 30 easy-to-read booklets. Now you can listen to them on your computer! Or you can download each program to your iPod or other mp3 player, so that you can listen while driving or jogging.

To listen to these programs, go to cis.podbean.com.
Now there are three easy ways of learning about your Catholic faith: order a free copy of the booklet from the CIS website, www.kofc.org/cis, read it on the same website, or listen to it at cis.podbean.com

Sister Mary Ellen on the Monks in Brazil

After I wrote you last Friday about our monks in Brazil, St. Mary Ellen, a Sister from Mt. St. Scholastica here in Atchison wrote the following account. Sr. Mary Ellen is currently the Principal at a Catholic grade school in the Lincoln Diocese.

I don’t think too much credit can be given to them in general and to the Kansas Monks in particular for the great development of the agricultural area. Father Eric, though not a Kansas farm boy, worked the farms at the Abbey and was a leader who consulted and brought to Brazil agronomists from the Kansas and Missouri State Departments of Agriculture with their helpers and visitors. He was one of the first to do soil testing and find out that soy beans would grow well on the high plateaus because of the soil and the timing of the rains. This brought in large machinery which was not in the area before. Brother Robert Heiman lived and worked those plateaus (chapadoes). He should give a report. He lived out there all week sometimes when they were planting or harvesting. Father Eric had requested him to help in this great agricultural development of southwestern Goias, which spread through the state and most of Mato Grosso.

The Abbey had its own small dairy herd for a number of years. They were again instrumental in better breeding and in using artificial insemination.

Fr. Eric got enough farmers together of start a coop for buying and selling. I’m sure it was his initiative. From the large store where they could buy on credit (like Orschlein’s) to selling. Large storages for the soy beans were not built like our elevators, but like quonset huts, so that the farmers did not have to immediately sell their crop which had to be trucked to Sao Paulo.

One of last things was probably to bring one (or maybe more) fire trucks from the states to Mineiros. There should be info at the abbey about this.
Of course education and the Church were never left out. He would get small schools started in the country regions. He was a leader with the Cursillo and had hundreds of members involved. He taught in the secondary schools and was instrumental in getting the cientifico started; like a junior college. There had been a normal for teacher training which continued.

Bishop Matthias was instrumental in building up the Christian Family Movement in the diocese. He was in charge of the lay dioconate program in our diocese. In 1968 when Pope Paul VI came to Bogota for the ECLA meeting there were two men from our diocese ordained to the permanent dioconate. One was from Mineiros, the father of our Sister Maria das Gracas.

Michael Beeman Named New Ravens Baseball Coach

"Doc" Comes To BC From Loyola-New Orleans
By Josh Pound, sports information director
(Tuesday, July 03, 2007)

Michael “Doc” Beeman, who spent the last three years as head coach at Loyola – New Orleans, has been named as the 13th head baseball coach at Benedictine College, Director of Athletics Richard Konzem announced Tuesday.

Coach Beeman also served as an assistant athletics director for rules compliance at Loyola. He was responsible for leading his team through Hurricane Katrina, which struck prior to his second year as head coach for the Wolfpack.

“Coach Beeman is a great addition to our coaching staff and to Benedictine College” said Konzem. “He was selected from a national pool of over 40 candidates and brings a strong work ethic, success in recruiting and coaching student-athletes and a commitment to excellence on the field and in the classroom.”

A graduate of Tulsa (OK) Union High School, Coach Beeman came to Loyola University from Georgetown University where he served as recruiting coordinator and pitching coach for the Hoyas.
Georgetown's overall record improved from 9 wins the season before his arrival to 25 wins in 2004.

Coach Beeman earned his Masters and Bachelors degrees from Trinity University where he was a team captain and three-time All-Conference selection.
An avid runner himself, Coach Beeman is actively involved in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure for which he served as a member of the New Orleans chapter committee.
Benedictine College is a four-year, Catholic, liberal arts college located on the bluffs of the Missouri River in Atchison, Kan. It has a mission to educate men and women within a community of faith and scholarship.

___________________________________________________ A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.
-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works

Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath,
-James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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Brazilian Monks arrive at their Abbey
In 1962, at the invitation of Pope John XXIII, the monks of St. Benedict’s Abbey began a mission in the third world. Our new Priory, under the patronage of St. Joseph, would be located in Meneiros, Brazil.

For the first time in 45 years, the entire community (except for one), is here in Atchison. This evening at Mass and Vespers it was awesome to know that these 8 men from Brazil, with their Benedictine habits, and their desire to seek after God, are officially monks of our Abbey. It’s like having a long lost relative come visit and getting caught up on what is going on.
Father Denis Meade, OSB, JCD, pointed out in his homily today that it is providential that our confreres from Brazil have arrived on the Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul. These two saints received the Word of God and set out to proclaim what they had experienced upon encountering Christ. Two of our monks who served in Brazil have been called to be successors of the Apostles: Bishop Matthias Schmidt, OSB (died in 1992) and Bishop Herbert Hermes, OSB, currently Bishop of Christolandia, Brazil. Our Father Eugene Dehner used to love to point out that these two men, as well as several Abbots at other houses who graduated from St. Benedict’s College were all Biology majors.

The description of the town where our Priory is located, Mineiros, is described by Wikipedia as:
Considered one of the most prosperous regions of Brazilian agribusiness, the municipality of Mineiros is a great producer of soybeans, corn, sorghum and cotton, as well as beef and dairy cattle. It is the third largest producer of grains in the state. In an axis of 100 kilometers from the city there are fields producing more than 1 million tons a year of soybeans and sorghum. Because of this the city has large grain storage facilities.

As in medieval Europe, and as in Africa and so many parts of the world today, it was and is the Benedictine monks who helped foster this culture. According to Maria Texeira Borges
In fact, the relative prosperity that Mineiros enjoys today is due in large part to the success of those very industries - soybeans and beef - that were so dramatically improved by the modern agricultural methods introduced by the Kansas farm boys turned Benedictine monks.

In the February 13, 2005 edition of Homepages Abbot Barnabas wrote The monks have helped the community intellectually and socially in every way you can imagine.

Festival of Faith
All are invited to our Festival of Faith a week from Sunday, July 8 with Mass celebrated at 2:00 PM in the Abbey Church by Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D., Archabbot of St. Vincent Archabbey, Latrobe, PA. This is a great time to meet our Brazilian monks, and to give thanks to God for 150 years of Benedictine life here in Kansas. Hope to see you there.

News from the Knights of Columbus
I received the following message from Paul Zalonski from the Supreme office of the Knights of Columbus

I am happy to announce a new initiative in spreading the Catholic faith in this new Year of Saint Paul (just announced by Pope Benedict XVI) through podcasting. As you know, podcasts are radio shows that are downloaded over the Internet to your computer or to your iPod.> At the Catholic Information Service at the Knights of Columbus, a colleague and I are producing podcasts using the booklets on the Catechism of the Catholic Church using the respected Luke E. Hart series. This series numbers 30 booklets which will take you through the basics of Catholic faith.

Each Thursday a new podcast will be uploaded to the server which you can download to your iPod or listen on your computer.

Visit: http://cis.podbean.com

___________________________________________________ A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
-Proverbs 15:1

Not to give way to anger.

-Rule of Saint Benedict, Chapter 4 on Tools of Good Works
Know this, my dear brothers: everyone should be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath,
-James 1, 19

Here the prophet shows that, if at times we ought to refrain from useful speech for the sake of silence, how much more ought we to abstain from evil words on account of the punishment due to sin.
-Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 6

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Year of St. Paul

Pope Benedict XVI has announced that there will be a special Year of St. Paul, from June 2008 through June 2009, to mark the 2000th anniversary of the Apostle Paul’s Birth. St. Paul is buried at the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls in Rome, which is taken care of by the Benedictine monks of the Abbey adjoining the Basilica. Our Father Bruce spent several months there with the monks during the jubilee year hearing Confessions.

In his announcement, the Pope said:

The Apostle of the Gentiles, who dedicated himself to the spreading of the good news to all peoples, spent himself for the unity and harmony of all Christians,
May he guide us and protect us in this bimillenary celebration, helping us to advance in the humble and sincere search for the full unity of all the members of the mystical body of Christ.

A Year of Anniversaries

This coming year will be a year of anniversaries for our monastic and college community:
This year, from April 2007 through April 2008 the monks celebrate our 150th anniversary of being a monastic community. All are invited to our next event, a Festival of Faith on Sunday, July 8 with Mass celebrated at 2:00 PM in the Abbey Church by Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D., Archabbot of St. Vincent Archabbey, Latrobe, PA
In 2008, Benedictine College will celebrate 150 of Benedictine education in Kansas.
The Knights of Columbus on campus will be celebrating their 50th anniversary in 2008.
FOCUS, or The Fellowship of Catholic University Students (begun here at Benedictine College) celebrate its 10th anniversary in 2008

St. Paul and the anniversaries

May St. Paul who encountered Christ and lived Christ in a profound way intercede for us as we celebrate these anniversaries. These are not just random historical dates, but these are road marks of God’s providential love for us.

I have been crucified with Christ; yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me; insofar as I now live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God who has loved me and given himself up for me.
Galatians 2, 19-20

___________________________________________________ From the beginning, this one Church has been marked by a great diversity which comes from both the variety of God's gifts and the diversity of those who receive them. Within the unity of the People of God, a multiplicity of peoples and cultures is gathered together.
The Catechism of the Catholic Church, #814

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Festival of Faith

Hopefully you have marked your calendars and will be able to join the monks of St. Benedict’s Abbey in the Abbey Church here on Sunday, July 8, 2007 for our Festival of Faith. As part of our 150th anniversary celebrations Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding monastery, will be principal celebrant of the 2:00 PM Mass that day.

Father Lemke’s analysis of the growth of the Benedictine Order in America

At this time, I must say that I am ashamed of my lack of faith and that the holy father Benedict has worked a miracle here. Also, one needed to have respect for Father Boniface
(Wimmer) who, with such a beginning and with such material to work with, brought about what we now can see in 1879. Because from this motley group, and what to me at the time seemed like a hopeless appearing beginning, there has come to be in thirty -five years a Benedictine congregation in America with two Bishops (including Bishop Fink of Leavenworth), three abbeys, nine priories, sixteen chapels and missions, five colleges or high schools, 188 priests and clerics and 151 lay brothers. A success of such wonder and magnitude is all the more noteworthy when one considers that not only external obstacles but also unacceptable adventures and big mistakes within the order itself have shown how these have been a part of this great expansion.
-From the Diary of Father Henry Lemke, OSB

Lectio Divina
Our celebration of 150 years of monastic life in Kansas reminds us of Pope John Paul II’s message to the Benedictines on the occasion of the 1500th anniversary of the founding of Subiaco. His words summarize the Benedictine life of prayer based on sacred reading, or lectio divina.

The example of St Benedict and the Rule itself offer significant direction for fully accepting the gift of these anniversaries. First and foremost they invite a witness of tenacious fidelity to the Word of God, meditated on and received through "lectio divina". This involves maintaining silence and an attitude of humble adoration before God, for the divine word reveals its depths to those who, through silence and mortification, are attentive to the Spirit's mysterious action.

While the requirement of regular silence establishes times when human words must be stilled, it points to a style marked by great moderation in verbal communication. If it is perceived and lived in its profound sense, it slowly teaches the interiorization by which the monk opens himself to a genuine knowledge of God and man. In a particular way, the great silence in Monasteries has a unique symbolic power of recalling what really counts: Samuel's absolute availability (cf. 1 Sm. 3) and the total, loving gift of self to the Father. None of the rest is eliminated, but is accepted in its profound reality and brought to God in prayer.

It is this school of "lectio divina" which the Church expects from monasteries: she does not seek masters of biblical exegesis, who can also be found elsewhere, but rather witnesses to a humble and tenacious fidelity to the Word in the inconspicuous setting of everyday life. Thus the "vita bonorum" becomes a "viva lectio" which can be understood even by those who, disillusioned by the inflation of human words, seek what is essential and authentic in their relationship with God and are ready to understand the message given by a life in which a relish for beauty and order is combined with moderation.

Familiarity with the Word, which the Benedictine Rule guarantees by reserving much time for it in the daily schedule, will not fail to instill serene trust, to cast aside false security and to root in the soul a vivid sense of the total lordship of God. The monk is thus protected from convenient or utilitarian interpretations of Scripture and brought to an ever deeper awareness of human weakness, in which God's power shines brightly.
-Pope John Paul II, 1999

___________________________________________________ It's not that there's fear and then we overcome it. With Christ, fear disappears
-Fr. Julian Carron President, Communion and Liberation

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Summer Theology Institute, July 19-21,
Catholic Diocese of Wichita

Event to explore, rediscover Catholic roots in Western Civilization
“How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization,” is the title of this year’s Summer Theology Institute (STI) being hosted at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita. Now in its ninth year, the STI is set for July 19-21 and features nationally known scholars presenting a slate of classes designed to educate and inspire. The Institute opens on Thursday, July 19 with an evening keynote address. Classes are held Friday and Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

“This year’s STI theme is a response to the words of Pope Benedict XVI who calls upon Europe and the United States, to rediscover its Christian roots,” explains Jeri Holladay, Director of Adult Education at the Center and the driving force behind the Institute. “Benedict believes that the West will not survive without a return and deep understanding of our heritage that brings dignity to the human person. This heritage is truly a gift to the world and one we want to reintroduce during the Institute.”
The featured keynote speaker and faculty member for the 2007 STI is Thomas Woods, Ph.D., a best-selling author and senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute (www.mises.org) based in Auburn, Alabama. This year’s theme is taken from Dr. Woods’ book of the same name (2005, Regnery Publishing, Inc.). He is also the author of the New York Times bestseller, “The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History.”

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B., chaplain and lecturer in Theology at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, joins Dr. Woods on the STI faculty. Father Meinrad will teach a course called “The Monastic Contribution: From Europe to Kansas.” In addition to duties as coordinator of the Institute, Mrs. Holladay will also teach a course on The Crusades.
The Summer Theology Institute is an intense religious education program with nationally recognized scholars filled with energy and inspiration designed to introduce and explore the Catholic Tradition. Created in 1999, the Institute offers catechists, RCIA team members, Catholic schoolteachers, DRE’s and anyone else deeply interested in their faith an opportunity to learn in a dynamic and supportive Catholic environment.

Overnight guests may reserve a private room at the Center, including a full slate of meals prepared and served on site. The Spiritual Life Center is considered one of the finest retreat centers in the Midwest and is easily accessible.

Earlybird discounted registration for the Institute is available now through June 22, with registration closed after July 5. A detailed brochure can be viewed and downloaded by logging onto the Spiritual Life Center web site at www.slcwichita.org, and going to the Calendar of Events page. Phone registration is available by calling the Center in Wichita at (316) 744-0167.

Wisdom from Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete
United States Communion and Liberation

April 2003 Traces Subscribe here: http://www.traces-cl.com/

DEBATE
The Key to the Christian Life
BY LORENZO ALBACETE

According to Cardinal Ratzinger, today’s Man is someone for whom Christianity is a past that does not concern him. It is not that the Christian faith’s contribution to history is not acknowledged (approvingly or disapprovingly). Many still see the Christian faith as an important source of values, ethical behavior, and religious or artistic inspiration.

What is seen as irrelevant or as unnecessary is the point of departure that defines and specifies the Christian reality, namely, the historical events of the Incarnation, death, and resurrection of Christ. These are considered “ways” of expressing Christian spirituality and ethics that have essentially been surpassed by other, more credible ways of saying the same thing. The key word here is concern. The historical events at the origin of the Christian claim are no longer of concern.

When something happens that shows how true it is that we live in such a post-Christian world (in spite of surviving and even impressive manifestations of Christian “folklorism”), we are tempted by two possibilities. Some insist on the need to promote or recapture Christian doctrinal orthodoxy, that is, the need to emphasize and teach the intellectual convictions that properly proclaim the Christian faith. For others, what matters is promoting and defending Christian morality as an ethical orientation (“liberal” or “conservative”), a system of “moral values” to guide our behavior. From this perspective, the relationship between the Christian faith and contemporary culture is seen as a culture war to be won, or a cultural contribution to be made by looking for a common point of departure for dialogue. Both “tactics” are in fact useless.

As Father Giussani has written, Christian evangelization is destroyed when we embrace the illusion that a non-Christian culture (where Christianity’s originating events are of no concern) should be confronted and overcome by a Christian culture (cf Dal temperamento un metodo, p 53). This, he says, is a deadly “fundamental error” that can tempt us, but which must be firmly rejected.

We cannot place our hopes on the creation of a “Christian culture,” and even less on going back to an idyllic past where Christianity maintained cultural hegemony. Such historical developments are not for us to design or plan. We do not know and will never know the “time plan” which the Father has for human history.

Instead, we must place our hope not on cultural proposals but on the event of Christ, on something that has already happened. Evangelization is to give witness to the fact–to the verifiable fact–that this event can and does still happen today because it has happened to us as something unforeseen, something amazing that surprises us, something that is not the result of our efforts or our particular ethical and spiritual predispositions. It is this that gives rise to concern, because an event is something that touches the heart, that changes us, that gives us a new vision of life’s possibilities.

Evangelization within a non-Christian culture is a matter of what St Augustine, writing about his own conversion, calls confession. Augustine wonders why God “made him” read the books of Plato (cf Confessions, VII, 20, 26). He concludes that the reason was so that after his conversion he could tell the difference inter praesumptionem et confessionem, between presumption and confession. To believe that one becomes a Christian through the proper philosophy, theology, spirituality, morality, or cultural project, is a presumption; it is to see our efforts as the cause of our belonging to Christ. Instead, we become Christians because the Incarnation happened in history, because the Paschal Mystery happened, because Pentecost happened, and because those events continue to happen in the world today. They happen now because they happened then and because the Church exists in the world as the life of a communion of persons created by these events, and making them present today through the sacraments. They happen because Christ has risen from the dead and can be encountered today with exactly the same results experienced by Andrew, James, John, Peter, Mary Magdalen, the Samaritan woman, the man born blind, Zaccheus, and the criminal at the cross next to His.

Something happened to them. It was an event. The key to the Christian life, the point of departure, is not an intellectual or cultural proposal. It is this event. This is what creates the concern which post-Christian man has so tragically lost. Evangelization is to give witness of our amazement at this unimaginable event. Evangelization is confession.

___________________________________________________ It's not that there's fear and then we overcome it. With Christ, fear disappears
-Fr. Julian Carron President, Communion and Liberation

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Pray for the monks as we have our annual Retreat Chapter tomorrow, and our retreat this week.

From a 1937 Ecclesiastical Review article on Spiritual Reading by Father Bonaventure Schwinn, OSB, Monk of St. Benedict’s Abbey
St. Benedict in his Holy Rule gives as the 56th instrument of good works, "To listen willingly to holy reading." And the very next instrument, the 57th, is "To apply one-self often to prayer." He does not speak of meditation in the modern sense; he formulates no method comparable to the meditation methods that have come into use since the 16th century; he fixes no time for mental prayer. On the other hand, he prescribes from two to five hours of devout reading (lectio divina) a day. He knew that mental prayer follows easily and naturally upon devout reading. Much of the time assigned by him for spiritual reading was intended to be spent in mental prayer, so that mental prayer was not to last for a half-hour or an hour but more or less continuously throughout the day. It was to be the soul of the Opus Dei, for which he provides so carefully, and it was to accompany spiritual reading, for which he makes so generous an allotment of time. For reading passes into mental prayer, and mental prayer tends to become contemplation and union with God.

Wisdom on Monastic Obedience
Saint Basil: Consequently, when a superior has been chosen, all private volition will give place and all, without exception, will follow the example of their head in obedience to the apostolic precept bidding every soul to be subject to higher powers and warning that 'they that resist purchase to themselves damnation.' True and perfect obedience of subjects to their superior is shown not only by their refraining from every untoward action in accordance with his advice, but also by their not doing even what is approved without his consent.

American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monks, Renew and Create. Obedience. Placing himself in a community of brothers under an abbot, the monk further readies himself to follow the call of God by obedience. The monk's obedience, which means a giving heed to (ob-audire) his abbot and brethren, must be seen as an expression of his faith and hope. By it the monk seeks to enter more fully into that mystery of loving obedience whereby Christ, fulfilling his Father's will, laid down his life for his brethren and opened for the future the hope of the resurrection. This is why the monk seeks to place God's will before all selfish impulse and why his obedience becomes a manifesto of fidelity to his brethren and of his responsibility to his own community, the Church, and the world.

Far, then, from being an attempt to crush the human will considered to be radically evil, or from being a mere technique to insure efficiency of institutional operation, the monk's obedience, as the heeding and attentive listening to others, becomes, in a very real sense, that love of neighbor which schools one for life in the family of God.

The monk who is faithful in listening attentively and heeding his abbot and brethren soon discovers the many positive benefits of obedience. Gradually he finds himself freed from the tyranny of self-centered impulse. The partial ignorance of himself and the prejudice which tend to obscure his judgment in matters touching him most personally are dissipated, as the monk grows in the wisdom of the Spirit mediated to him through his spiritual father and his community. As through obedience he gains deeper insight into the spirit which is in him, so too does he learn to discern the spirit in others.

Besides deeper self-knowledge, obedience can also provide a greater scope of activity for the individual monk, for his benefit and that of others; through obedience to his abbot and the encouragement of his brothers, the monk may be emboldened to undertake tasks and responsibilities which he might not otherwise accept.

In all these ways, then, obedience is intended to liberate the monk through the power of the cross, to give his natural talents the capacity for growth, and to increase his dedication to that worship and service which are the vocation of the children of God.
p ___________________________________________________ It's not that there's fear and then we overcome it. With Christ, fear disappears
-Fr. Julian Carron President, Communion and Liberation

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Our prayers go to the family and friends of Kelsey Smith, and to all who mourn her death. May she rest in peace!

Psalm 23
The LORD is my shepherd; there is nothing I lack.

In green pastures you let me graze; to safe waters you lead me;

you restore my strength. You guide me along the right path for the sake of your name.

Even when I walk through a dark valley, I fear no harm for you are at my side; your rod and staff give me courage.

You set a table before me as my enemies watch; You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.

Only goodness and love will pursue me all the days of my life; I will dwell in the house of the LORD for years to come.

Rostock, Germany: G8 and Father Lemke
As the leaders of the G8 summit meet near Rostock Germany, I am reminded that this is the city where the founder of our Abbey, Father Henry Lemke, studied to be a Lutheran pastor at the University of Rostock. (Before his conversion, of course) It is also the only German university to ever award Albert Einstein an Honorary Doctorate.

It was through a strange series of student agitation events in the 1820s at Rostock (not unlike the events today) that would place Henry Lemke’s life and a man by the name of Adler on the same path: Adler to return to his Catholic faith, Lemke to become a Roman Catholic, both traveling to Regensburg, Bavaria to do so under the saintly Bishop Sailer.

Adler had come to Rostock, because his friend, Karl Sand had murdered Kotzebue. Earlier in the Diary, Lemke lets us know exactly what he thinks about attending a play written by that good for nothing Kotzebue:

This particular presentation was a work by Kotzebue, which was filled with nothing but derogation, since he spoke of nothing except to ridicule the sacred and to drag anything lofty down into the dirt. In one of the scenes, in which a pious Quaker, appeared and was satirized in a most disgusting manner, the applause and laughter from the students sitting next to me just wouldn’t come to an end. I became so incensed by this from the very core of my being, seeing that what is lofty and holy should be made fun of, that I began to whistle as loudly as I could. Thereupon, there began a regular free-for-all, resulting in my leaving the theater with a bloodied head.

As the Wikipedia mentions: He (Kotzebue) was especially detested by the young enthusiasts for liberty, and one of them, Karl Ludwig Sand,*** a theology student, stabbed him, in Mannheim. Sand was executed, and the government made his crime an excuse for placing the universities under strict supervision.

***Sand’s friend “Adler” would leave this behind and become a student, along with the founder of our Abbey, Henry Lemke, at the University of Rostock, Germany. In his Diary, Father Lemke mentions Adler’s conversion back to the Roman Catholic

One day, he (Adler) stopped at my room and began by saying: “For a long time now, I have found myself in conflict and have experienced a real turmoil within my soul. Tomorrow, I am going back to Schwerin and reconcile myself once again with my church. In Berlin, I was enticed into joining the Freemasons, which the church condemns. I want you to be a witness that I am publicly renouncing my affiliation.” And, with that, he threw his insignia patch and various pieces of literature into the stove. Then he added: “I swear that I will never reveal any of the secrets of the order; because I promised under oath to hold them secret. But this much I will tell you. Be most assured of what I say. The Catholic Church is entirely correct, in their condemning of this group, because the antichrist is behind their entire history.” The next morning, he took off on his pilgrimage and, eight days later, he returned to me happy and at peace with himself.

Saint Benedict and The Risk of Education
When Saint Benedict wrote at the beginning of his Rule for Monasteries that he was establishing a School of the Lord’s Service, I think he meant more than something one graduates from at solemn vows to do whatever he wants. Rather he was establishing a way of looking at the totality of reality for all of ones life with this group of monks. While St. Benedict didn’t use this exact phrase, one who did was Monsignor Luigi Giussani, the founder of Communion and Liberation.

Just a few weeks ago, Communion and Liberation hosted an evening in London to talk about The Risk of Education. They had assembled some great minds to address the topic in the light of Monsignor Giussani’s teaching. You can watch the video of this presentation by going to the Communion and Liberation website: http://www.clonline.us/home.cfm and looking under “Features.”

Presenting on the video are
Peter Hodgson, Senior Research Fellow in Nuclear Physics at Oxford University.
John Milbank, Noted Anglican scholar and founder of the Radical Orthodoxy movement.
Father Julian Carron, Professor at the Catholic University of Madrid, President of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation in Rome.

___________________________________________________ It's not that there's fear and then we overcome it. With Christ, fear disappears
-Fr. Julian Carron President, Communion and Liberation

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







bell ringing in the news and views

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Death of Bishop Marion Forst. May he Rest in Peace.
Need for workers to help raise money at KC Royals Games for BC Campus Ministry.
Wisdom from Father Julian Carron, President of Communion and Liberation. http://www.clonline.org/

Death of Bishop Marion Forst
He was the oldest Bishop in the United States
Attended all of Vatican II

Bishop Marion Francis Forst (September 3, 1910 — June 3, 2007) was the oldest living American bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. He was Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus of Kansas City, Kansas, Bishop Emeritus of Dodge City, Kansas, and the Titular Bishop of Leavenworth, Kansas.

Bishop Forst was ordained a priest on June 10, 1934, and ordained a bishop on March 24, 1960. He retired on December 23, 1986.

Reception of the Body, St. Mary-St. Anthony Church, Wed., 6/6/07, 4 p.m.
Mass, St. Mary-St. Anthony Church, Wed., 6/6/07, 5:30 p.m.
Mass, Savior Pastoral Center, Thurs., 6/7/07, Noon

Interment, Resurrection Cemetery, Thurs., 6/7/07, following the noon Mass of Christian Burial.

Bishop Forst was my Bishop growing up in the Dodge City Diocese. During his retirement he worked in the Marriage office for the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas and he always remembered that I was born in Tribune, KS. He would write a note on the marriage papers How are things in Tribune?

This past year our Br. John Peto, OSB, took a group of Benedictine College students down to see Bishop Forst and hear his stories of Vatican II.

From Liz Hruska
(I pass along the following message from Liz Hruska. Give her a call if you and/or friends can help.)
I'm looking for volunteers who can help raise money for BC Campus
Ministry...We're selling concessions at Royals games, and I need a few
more people fast! Please call me (Liz) at 913.360.7414 if you can help; I'd
really appreciate it!!! If you know anyone who lives in the KC area and
can help, please forward this along! It would be better if the volunteers
were over age 21.

We get free food and a Royals cap, and if we can do 10 games, we earn the
right to work Chiefs games in the fall. :)

Here are the dates and times:
June 8th 4:15
June 9th 3:15
June 10th 10:45am
June 12th 4:45
June 13th 4:45
June 14th 4:45
June 15th 2:30
June 16th 3:15
June 17th 10:45am
Thanks for your help!

Wisdom from Father Julian Carron, President of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation.
http://www.clonline.org/

So I like that phrase of Saint Paul which he told to the Corinthians, who were also a tiny community (“four cats”, as they say in Italian). It was a little tiny group of people and there, in the middle of Corinth,
which was like the New York of the time, with all of the chaos there was, Saint Paul has the nerve to say to the Corinthians, to this tiny little group of friends who made up the Christian community of Corinth,
“The grace of God, the witness of Christ has been manifest so powerfully among you that there is no gift of grace that you are lacking.” I want to say to each and every one of you exactly what Saint Paul said to the Corinthians. You are not lacking any gift of grace, no matter the situation, whether there are two or three or four of you or twenty-five of you. -Father Carron.

___________________________________________________ It's not that there's fear and then we overcome it. With Christ, fear disappears
-Fr. Julian Carron President, Communion and Liberation http://www.clonline.org/

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



The Risk of Education

This week, yesterday, today, and tomorrow, I am teaching 31 teachers and Youth ministers from the Archdiocese of Kansas City a course on The Risk of Education by Monsignor Luigi Giussani, the founder of Communion and Liberation. The course meets for four hours in the morning at Nativity Catholic Grade School in Leawood, Ks. The wonder of this experience is how much I have learned from these teachers about the great things they are doing in the classroom. I think they are also appreciating Monsignor Giussani’s approach to education and to all of reality.

Pope Benedict XVI to Communion and Liberation

...the late John Paul II entrusted you with this mandate, "Go out into the whole world to bring the truth, the beauty and the peace that are met in the encounter with Christ the redeemer." Father Giussani made those words the program of the whole Movement, and for Communion and Liberation it was the start of a missionary period that took you to 80 countries. Today I invite you to continue on this path with a deep, personalized faith, solidly rooted in the living Body of Christ, the Church which guarantees Jesus' presence with us in this moment.

Sr. Mary Faith Schuster, OSB, Ph.D.

There was a great tribute to +Sr. Mary Faith Schuster, OSB, of Mt. St. Scholastica Monastery on the front page of the Local section of the Kansas City Star today. The editor of that section had studied here at Benedictine College under Sr. Faith in the late 1970s.

The following is something Sr. Faith wrote about heaven a number of years ago.
"Just be at home,"God said. "Don't be afraid of anything or anyone. We're all plain persons here. You are used to loving us. The only surprise for you is that you didn't know how much we have always loved you. Adam and Eve, Jacob and Moses, and Isaac--They're all here. Your parents are here, too. Your mother, you remember how you loved her in the green-checkered dress with the pretty blue apron, showing you that blue and green could mix. And your father who was so handsome and carried you upstairs one time when you had the nightmare about the porch being filled with strawberries that you thought needed to be stemmed."

Then God and I walked into all of heaven. There was a kind of silence all around me. God looked at me, and I said, "Father, I'm so glad to be alive--alive as I always was," and God finished, "as you always shall be, world without end. Amen."

___________________________________________________ It's not that there's fear and then we overcome it. With Christ, fear disappears
-Fr. Julian Carron President, Communion and Liberation http://www.clonline.org/

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Anniversary of Abbot Barnabas’ election
Tomorrow (May 30) is the 13th anniversary of the election of Abbot Barnabas as the Eighth Abbot of St. Benedict’s Abbey. We are grateful to almighty God for his guidance these years and pray for him. During his time as Abbot,

the college has witnessed a stabilization and amazing growth.
He has maintained a regular contact with our mission in Brazil.
He has done much to cultivate friends and support for the Abbey.
He has overseen the completion of the Abbey pipe organ, and maintenance of the Abbey building and grounds.
You can often find him outside doing manual labor on the grounds of the Monastery.

Please join me in praying for Abbot Barnabas in thanksgiving for his fidelity to the Office of the Abbot.

Death of a Friend
Manuella Rodriguez, a friend of my family from my hometown of Leoti, Ks. died last evening. She had worked at my family’s restaurant in Leoti when I was growing up. May she rest in peace. May the souls of all the faithful departed through the Mercy of God rest in peace.

The Risk of Education goes to England
In an all star line-up, The Risk of Education was presented last Thursday evening in England. The presenters included:

Fr. Julian Carron (head of the President of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, holds a doctorate in Sacred Scripture)
Dr. Peter Hodgson, (Senior Research Fellow in Physics at Oxford University.)
Professor John Milbank, (Professor of Religion, Politics and Ethics at the University of Nottingham.)

The faith is not given us in order that we preserve it, but in order that we communicate it. If we don't have the passion to communicate it, we don't preserve it. Monsignor Luigi Giusssani (Written contribution to the XXI plenary assembly of the Pontifical Council for the Laity, 2004)

Upcoming Events
I) General Chapter of the American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monasteries will be here beginning June 17. Abbots and Priors from Benedictine Abbeys and Priories, as well as one delegate from each house will be here this includes:

St. Vincent Archabbey, Pa
St. John’s Abbey, Mn
St. Benedict’s Abbey, Ks
St. Mary’s Abbey, NJ
Belmont Abbey, NC
St. Bernard Abbey, Al
St. Procopius Abbey, Il
St. Gregory’s Abbey, Ok
St. Leo Abbey, Fl
Assumption Abbey, ND
St. Bede Abbey, Il
St. Peter’s Abbey, Canada
St. Martin’s Abbey, Wa
St. Anselm Abbey, NH
St. Andrew Abbey, Oh
Mount Savior Priory, NY
Newark Abbey, NJ
Tepeyac Abbey, Mexico
San Antonio Abad, Puerto Rico
Mary Mother of the Church Abbey, Va.

II) The meeting of the leaders of Benedictine Universities from around the United States will be here in June.
III) Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day at the Abbey. Welcoming the Monks from our Priory in Mineiros, Brazil.
IV) Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes,
Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding
monastery, will be principal celebrant of the 2:00 PM Mass.

V) Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities for the Abbey’s 150th anniversary.
___________________________________________________ If anyone says, "I love God," but hates his brother, he is a liar; for whoever does not love a brother whom he has seen cannot love God whom he has not seen. This is the commandment we have from him: whoever loves God must also love his brother.
1 John 4, 20-21

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Sesquicentennial

Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist

Communion and Liberation

FOCUS
We remember on this Memorial Day all who have died, especially those who gave their lives in defense of our freedom.

Sesquicentennial

On July 8 the monks will have another celebration of our 150th anniversary. Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D., Archabbot of St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa will celebrate Mass at 2:00 PM on July 8 in the Abbey Church. Mark your calendar and bring you family and friends to celebrate with the monks this special event!!!
From the Diary of our founder, Fr. Henry Lemke, OSB: The Kansas territory had just become a state within the union (1854) and it had been opened to immigrants. As a result, people from all directions came streaming into this wonderful land. At this time in Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, there was in residence a Doctor Rodrigue, a well-trained physician of French origin. Back in the time when Gallitzin was still alive, Bishop Kenrick, friend of a family then living in Philadelphia, had recommended the young doctor and helped him become established there. He formed a practice in Ebensburg and in a very short time had developed a wide-spread clientele.
This man was, above all, a dear, good, all-around well-versed individual. He was the only one of my acquaintances with whom I could carry on in a truly friendly manner, and we soon were bosom friends. One really needs to understand the condition of society in America in order to grasp what a wonderful thing it is when one meets a truly well-versed man; a man who lives a life of high ideals and intents, and not one like the general American rabble.

I remember one time sitting with the Archbishop of Vienna at a luncheon. The conversation turned to the mob riots of 1848. One of the people present that day turned to me and asked: “What is the situation there in America with the mobs?” I countered, “there is no such thing as a mob class in America. Haven’t you possibly read in the newspapers that the legislators are always rousting about in their chambers like drunken cobbler apprentices?”

Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist
I had the honor of helping with a vocation retreat for the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist in Ann Arbor, Mi. this last weekend.

In 10 years they have grown from 4 sisters to nearly 70

There were 108 women on the retreat from all over the United States and Australia and Canada.

The love of the Eucharist and of the Church shines on the face of these Sisters and the young women on the retreat.

The Vocation Directress, Sr. Joseph Andrew, does a wonderful job of working with these women and helping them discern their vocation.

Mother Assumpta is grateful to the support given to Religious Life in this country for many years by Father James Downey, OSB, a monk of our Abbey who for years was the Executive Director of the Institute on Religious Life.

In addition to this weekend, other weekend retreat for women interested in the Sisters:
* November 3-4, 2007
* December 1-2, 2008* Women's Retreat
* February 23-24, 2008
* May 24-25, 2008
Times: 2:00 PM on Saturday to 3:00 PM on Sunday.

For more information about the retreats see the contact information below.
Due to space limitations, your registration will be secured when we receive
the $25.00 registration fee.

Location:
Spiritus Sanctus Academy - Ann Arbor
4101 Joy Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 996-3855

Contact: Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz, O.P.
Vocations Director
734.994.7437
sjab@sistersofmary.org

Communion and Liberation

This week I will be teaching a class on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday for the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas Institute for Religious Studies. I will basically be covering The Risk of Education by Monsignor Luigi Giussani. As I discover more about Giussani, I can see why he got along so well with Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI
This coming weekend I will be leading the spiritual exercises of Communion and Liberation in California at Santa Barbara. I attended these exercises three years ago at St. Meinrad Archabbey in Indiana. This weekend is a powerful experience.

Fellowship of Catholic University Students (FOCUS)

Mission of FOCUS: To know Christ Jesus, and to fulfill His Great Commission, by first living and then communicating the fullness of life within the Family of God, the Church.

For the next 6 weeks there will be FOCUS missionaries from around the United States here on the campus of Benedictine College for their annual training. What began here in January of 1998 has now become a nationally recognized program for evangelization. Pray for all the FOCUS missionaries.

___________________________________________________ If anyone says, "I love God," but hates his brother, he is a liar; for whoever does not love a brother whom he has seen cannot love God whom he has not seen. This is the commandment we have from him: whoever loves God must also love his brother.
1 John 4, 20-21

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

http://www.sistersofmary.org/
I will be the priest for the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of Eucharist vocations retreat in Ann Arbor, Michigan this weekend. They also have some other vocation retreats coming up. On their webpage (see address above) they give a brief and simple explanation of their apostolate: Our apostolate, as spiritual mothers, is the preaching and teaching of Truth.

In addition to this weekend, other weekend retreat for women interested in this order:
* May 26-27, 2007
* November 3-4, 2007
* December 1-2, 2008* Women's Retreat
* February 23-24, 2008
* May 24-25, 2008
Times: 2:00 PM on Saturday to 3:00 PM on Sunday.

For more information about the retreats see the contact information below. Due to space limitations, your registration will be secured when we receive the $25.00 registration fee.

Location:
Spiritus Sanctus Academy - Ann Arbor
4101 Joy Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 996-3855

Contact: Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz, O.P.
Vocations Director
734.994.7437
sjab@sistersofmary.org

Pope Benedict XVI to Communion and Liberation
May the Holy Virgin accompany you and help you to pronounce generously your yes to the will of God in every circumstance. You can count, dear friends, on my constant recollection in prayer, while with affection I bless all of you here present and the whole of your spiritual family.

Sister Mary Faith Schuster, OSB, Ph.D.
July 10, 1914 – May 23, 2007
May she rest in peace!

Vigil service: Friday May 25, 7 pm Monastery chapel.
(Mt. St. Scholastica Monastery, Atchison, Ks)
The Mass of Resurrection will be there Saturday, May 26, 10:30am. followed by burial in the community cemetery.

I remember talking to Sr. Mary Faith about my desire to be a monk and a priest. She would always tell me the story of her brother, Father Daniel Schuster, OSB, who was a monk at Conception Abbey and helped found The Printery House there. Her mother would tell her let’s be very quiet today, your brother is thinking about being a priest. One of her cousins, Father Phillip Schuster, OSB was murdered at Conception Abbey the other year by a deranged gunman.

Excerpt From Sr. Mary Faith’s The Book Of Wisdom
Left On Our Doors
Let
us just not
try so hard.

The moon
is not
trying hard.

The trees
are
quiet here now.

Enough people
love us
to hold our hearts
safely together.

We will
all be all right
if we just love
even one
person well.

For any one
true love
touches all earth
with something fresh
and good.

So delicate
is goodness,
so strong
and fragile
with light.

___________________________________________________ If anyone says, "I love God," but hates his brother, he is a liar; for whoever does not love a brother whom he has seen cannot love God whom he has not seen. This is the commandment we have from him: whoever loves God must also love his brother.
1 John 4, 20-21

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



+Sister Mary Faith Schuster, OSB, Ph.D.
It’s amazing to see how God’s providence works. As the Church prepares for the great Solemnity of Pentecost this coming Sunday, we open our hearts to the gifts of the Holy Spirit, who in turn continues to show the world the Face of Jesus Christ, come in the flesh; and the Mercy of the Father.

Tim Hickey a graduate of our college, and Editor of Columbia Magazine, of the Knights of Columbus, the largest regular Roman Catholic publication in the world, wrote me the following beautiful tribute to Sr. Mary Faith, and how she taught her students to see the Holy Spirit as leading them to the Word behind our written words.
Father: If anyone could be said to have had a "beatific" smile, it was
Sister Faith. I have been blessed to have had great English teachers
throughout my life, but Sister Faith taught me -- and so many others at
Benedictine -- that the Word should be behind our written words. And, for
some reason, this morning I'm drawn to remember Gerard Manley Hopkins'
poem, "God's Grandeur," which she taught us in one of our British
literature courses... "The world is charged with the grandeur of God..."
and "the Holy Ghost over the bent World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings."
-Tim Hickey, Editor, Columbia Magazine of the Knights of Columbus

The noted Jesuit spiritual author, Father George Maloney, S.J., dedicated his 1993 book The Spirit Broods Over the World (Alba House, New York) to Sr. Mary Faith with the following words:
To
Sister Mary Faith, O.S.B.
Of Mount St. Scholastica Monastery in Atchison, Kansas,
Who has taught youth in the Midwest
For over Fifty years in her English classes
and
In her beautiful poetry how to discover in wonderment
The brooding of the Holy Spirit.

Come Holy Spirit, come through the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, fill the hearts of your faithful and enkindle within them the fire of Divine love!!!

Hope
Sister Mary Faith Schuster, OSB, PhD.
Hope
is the most active of all the theological virtues.

It walks past the frozen flowers and notices the green sprigs above them.

It is small and firm and looks into the face of God, and says "Good morning, I knew you would be there."

It's on all the roads to work today and in the high clouds.

It's clean and pure. It's deep in our souls, and sure.

The Holy Spirit in the Work of Monsignor Luigi Giussani
Pope Benedict XVI

Whoever believes has also to pass through the “valley of darkness,” the dark valleys of discernment, as well as adversities, opposition and ideological hostilities that even took the form of threats to eliminate his (Giussani’s) people physically, so as to get rid of this other voice that is not content merely with doing things, but brings a greater message, and thus also a greater light.

In virtue of the faith, Monsignor Giussani passed fearlessly through these dark valleys and naturally, with the novelty he carried with him, found it difficult to find a niche inside the Church. Even though the Holy Spirit, according to the needs of the times, creates something new, which is really the return to the origins, it is difficult to see one’s way and to find peaceful harmony in the great communion of the Universal Church. Fr Giussani’s love for Christ was also love for the Church, and thus he always remained a faithful servant, faithful to the Holy Father and faithful to his Bishops. With his foundations he also gave new interpretation to the mystery of the Church.

Pope John Paul II to Communion and Liberation
February 11, 2002. Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes
Years ago, on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the foundation of "Communion and Liberation", I said to you: "Go out into the world and take with you the truth, the beauty and the peace that are found in Christ the Redeemer" (Rome, 29 September 1984, n. 4). At the beginning of the third millennium of the Christian age, I give you the same mandate, with vigor and with gratitude. I urge you to cooperate conscientiously in the mission of dioceses and parishes, courageously extending their missionary action to the very ends of the earth.

May the Lord go with you and make your work fruitful. May Mary, the faithful Virgin and Star of the new evangelization, be your support and guide you on the path of ever more daring fidelity to the Gospel.

___________________________________________________ If anyone says, "I love God," but hates his brother, he is a liar; for whoever does not love a brother whom he has seen cannot love God whom he has not seen. This is the commandment we have from him: whoever loves God must also love his brother.
1 John 4, 20-21

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



+Sister Mary Faith Schuster, O.S.B.
July 10, 1914 – May 23, 2007
May she rest in peace!

Vigil service: Friday May 25, 7 pm Monastery chapel.

(Mt. St. Scholastica Monastery, Atchison, Ks)

The Mass of Resurrection will be there Saturday, May 26, 10:30am. followed by burial in the community cemetery.

In the Spring of 1984 I had Sr. Faith for my English Literature course here at Benedictine College. Like so many of the wonderful sisters at the Mount, she taught by her entire life the love of learning and the desire for God.

Our Fr. Hugh said that Sr. Faith helped many students at the college who were struggling with drugs and alcohol to break their addictions and find help.

In the words of Sister Thomasita,
This morning at 3:15, our Sister Mary Faith Schuster entered eternity. The
vigil is scheduled for Friday and her funeral is Saturday. You may have
already heard about her passing. I know a great many of the BC community
will want the news of her services. She was dearly loved and greatly
respected...
From 2:00-3:00 a.m., I was with her. She died peacefully.

She is our third death in the community this week. Tuesday was Sr. Yvonne's
vigil; today her funeral. Tomorrow is Sr. Sara Marie's vigil; Fri her
funeral. It's a heavy week. We keep a sister at the side of the one who is
dying, so we have had many hours of doing what St Benedict says to do: "Keep
death daily before your eyes." Death is strange...it is peaceful and full of
hope; it is also heavy. I guess it's the emptiness or the loss that is
heavy, if one can speak of a "hole" as being heavy.

So they see God face-to-face, as we thank God for their lives...and miss them.
Sr Thomasita

A Note Received from Sr. Mary Faith in 1994
On July 18, 1994, Sr. Faith wrote me the following note after I had said Mass for the Sisters there, and we had all learned of the death of Sr. Georgia, Dean of the College.

Dear Father Meinrad,
All the priests who say Mass in Dooley Center are very special, but it was a wonderful grace of God that brought the youngest Benedictine alumnus-priest who sang her Mass and spoke and prayed so tenderly and eloquently of her in her new place with God. She must love the fitness of that.
And that finest voice at the Abbey sang for her at her first hearing of Heaven’s choir.
This was your “first Mass” for me I loved it.
Thank you very much
Asking your blessing.
P.S. Thank you for singing much of it. You are indeed “a priest forever.”
Sister Mary Faith.
(July 18, 1994 Day of the death of Sr. Georgia, Dean of the College)

Raising Money with Father Eugene
When Benedictine College built the new student union (basketball court, auditorium, etc.) It was Sister Mary Faith and Father Eugene who were the honorary co-chairs of the fund drive. This shortly following a time when many thought the college was going to close.

Speaking of the Spiritual Life with Father Eugene
Sr. Faith and Fr. Eugene also wrote the forwards to Dr. William Hyland’s edition of Abbot Martin Veth’s spiritual conferences to the Sisters of Mt. St. Scholastica Monastery. Sr. Faith had transcribed these beautiful gems to be kept alive.

Obituary (From http://www.mountosb.org/
Under what’s Happening
Sister Mary Faith Schuster, O.S.B., 92, died Wednesday, May 23, 2007, at Mount St. Scholastica, Atchison, Kans. The vigil service will be Friday, May 25, at 7 pm in the monastery chapel. The Mass of Resurrection will be there Saturday, May 26, 10:30am. followed by burial in the community cemetery.

Born July 10, 1914, Sister Mary Faith (Gertrude) was one of twelve children of Fred and Jennie Brummel Schuster of Pilot Grove, Mo. She entered the Atchison Benedictines in 1934 and made monastic profession in 1936. A graduate of Mount St. Scholastica College, she earned the doctorate in English at St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo., in 1953. For more than 50 years she taught in the high schools and colleges staffed by her community. After 14 years in high schools, including the former Lillis High School, Kansas City, Mo., she taught at Donnelly College, Kansas City, Kans.; Marillac College, Normandy, Mo; and Mount St. Scholastica College and Benedictine College, Atchison. Sister Mary Faith was also dean at Donnelly College 1963-67. She gave particular attention to international students, assisting their transition to second language use and to at-homeness in another culture.

Sister Mary Faith traveled to New England and California on grants from the Kansas City Regional Council for Higher Education, and to Thailand, India, and Europe. She was a past member of the Modern Language Association, the National Council of Teachers of English, and the American Benedictine Academy. She received first place award for biography in 1950 from the Catholic Press Association. Benedictine College recognized her in 1977 with the Offeramus medal, an award given annually to an outstanding alumna, and in 1980 with the Teacher of the Year Award.

A teacher of remarkable intensity and influence, Sister Mary Faith urged her students to write, to capture with words the fleeting moments of insight or beauty, and convinced them that it was possible for them to do so. A writer herself, she published for more than fifty years in national and regional magazines and newspapers. For her community's centennial in 1963, she wrote its history, The Meaning of the Mountain. She co-founded the Kansas Poetry Society in 1985 to give a publishing outlet for young writers, and for some years edited its publication, Sunflower Petals. A regular columnist for The Leaven, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas, she also taught creative writing classes at the Atchison Shepherd's Center. Of her own work she said, "Writing is too serious to me for it to be called a hobby. In many ways it is almost a necessity.” (Read some of Sister Mary Faith's poetry.)

She was predeceased by her parents, by her brothers Arthur, Fred, and the Rev. Daniel Schuster, O.S.B. (Leo), of Conception Abbey, Conception, Mo.; by her sisters, Sister Scholastica (Imelda) Schuster, O.S.B., of the Atchison community; Sisters Teresa (Benedicta) and Xavier (Winifred) Schuster of Yankton, S.D.; and by her sisters Adela (Mrs. William Schollmeyer), Elinor (Mrs. William James O’Shea), and Mildred. She is survived by her sister Rosemary (Mrs. Bud McKiernan), Marceline, Mo; and her brother Dr. Joseph Schuster, Grand Junction, Colo; by nieces and nephews, and by her monastic family. Memorials may be sent to Mount St. Scholastica.

Let us remember her gratefully in our prayers.

___________________________________________________ If anyone says, "I love God," but hates his brother, he is a liar; for whoever does not love a brother whom he has seen cannot love God whom he has not seen. This is the commandment we have from him: whoever loves God must also love his brother.
1 John 4, 20-21

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Renee Winkel informed me that Mother Mary Luke of the Sisters of Charity of Mary Mother of the Church died on May 5. May her soul, and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God rest in peace.

Mother became ill when she was visiting Benedictine College for the vocation day in April. She was here with Sr. Mary Jacinta from her community. I went to St. Joseph to anoint her in the hospital. She made it back to her community in Connecticut and died there on May 5.

Also continue to remember the Sisters from the Mount in Atchison who recently died:

+Sister Sara Marie (Mary Crispin) Chagollan, 77, died Tuesday morning, May 22 at Mount St. Scholastica. Arrangements are pending and will be posted when finalized (http://www.mountosb.org/ ). May she and all our departed sisters rest in peace and be remembered gratefully in our prayers.

+Sister Yvonne Barrington, 80, died Saturday morning, May 19, at Mount St. Scholastica. The vigil service will be held on Tuesday, May 22 at 7 p.m. and the Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, May 23, both at Mount St. Scholastica. Burial will follow in the monastic cemetery. May she rest in peace and be remembered gratefully in our prayers.

___________________________________________________ Dodge City has a reputation for evil and wickedness at night, but is quiet and practically respectable during the daylight hours.
-Father Boniface Verheyen, OSB, Monk of St. Benedict’s Abbey, Missionary and scholar.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Deaths at Mount St. Scholastica Monastery

+Sister Sara Marie (Mary Crispin) Chagollan, 77, died Tuesday morning, May 22 at Mount St. Scholastica. Arrangements are pending and will be posted when finalized (http://www.mountosb.org/ ). May she and all our departed sisters rest in peace and be remembered gratefully in our prayers.

+Sister Yvonne Barrington, 80, died Saturday morning, May 19, at Mount St. Scholastica. The vigil service will be held on Tuesday, May 22 at 7 p.m. and the Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, May 23, both at Mount St. Scholastica. Burial will follow in the monastic cemetery. May she rest in peace and be remembered gratefully in our prayers.

Prayers for BC graduate Father David Linnebur
Bishop Jackels of Wichita has asked that the people of the Diocese of Wichita pray to Father Kapaun for a miraculous cure of Father David Linnebur (BC graduate) who is gravely ill with cancer. If a miracle occurs, it would count towards the cause for Father Kapaun’s canonization.

Below, is the prayer that we ask you to say daily, either as a family or individually. Thank you for joining us in this very sacred cause.

Lord Jesus,
in the midst of the folly of war,
your servant, Chaplain Emil Kapaun,
spent himself in total service to you
on the battlefields and in the prison camps of Korea,
until his death at the hands of his captors.> We now ask you, Lord Jesus, if it be your will,
to make known to all the world the holiness of Chaplain Kapaun
and the glory of his complete sacrifice for you
by signs of miracles and peace, especially the complete cure of Father David Linnebur.

In your name, Lord, we ask,
for you are the source of peace,
the strength of our service to others,
and our final hope.
Amen.

Prayers for Brad Kunecke’s mother
Brad Kunecke’s mother died. Please remember the repose of her soul in your prayers. Brad and his wife Sherrie had worked at Benedictine College, Brad as the Assistant Dean of Students, and Sherrie as the Business Manager. Brad currently teaches and coaches at Maur Hill Mount Academy.

Prayers for Father Blaine
Father Blaine Schultz, OSB, the Choirmaster and Guestmaster of the Abbey, and long time teacher in the Benedictine College music department, is receiving chemotherapy treatment for cancer. So many of the readers of this update know Father Blaine from his hospitality here at the Abbey, and his work with the Community Concert series here in Atchison. He’s doing fine, but please remember him in your prayers.

This is how you can know the Spirit of God: every spirit that acknowledges Jesus Christ come in the flesh belongs to God. 1 John 4,2

The Humility of the Flesh
BY LORENZO ALBACETE
As we await the great Solemnity of Pentecost, the following reflection by Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete that appeared in the December 2000 Traces (Communion and Liberation) sheds light on the role of the Incarnation for the Paschal Mystery.

“Glory to that Hidden One, Who even with the mind cannot be felt at all by them that pry into Him; but Who by His graciousness, was felt by the hand of man! The Nature that could not be touched, by His hands was bound and tied, by His feet was pierced and lifted up. Of His own will He embodied Himself for them that took Him” (Ephrem of Syria, Hymn II, “On the Nativity of Christ in the Flesh”).

Ever since the origin of the Christian claim that the Infinite Mystery at the root and destiny of all that exists took on human flesh, every effort has been made to reverse the Incarnation, to separate the “ultimate meaning” and “sense” of existence from the flesh of the one man Jesus of Nazareth.

A strange hatred of the flesh lies at the heart of this effort to separate Christ from the flesh. Remember Tertullian’s accusation against Marcion: “Come now, beginning from the nativity itself, declaim against the uncleanness of the generative elements within the womb, the filthy concretion of fluid and blood, of the growth of the flesh for nine months long out of that very mire. Describe the womb as it enlarges from day to day, heavy, troublesome, restless even in woman in travail which, however, ought rather to be honored in consideration of that peril, or to be held sacred in respect to the mystery of nature. Of course, you are horrified also at the infant, which is shed into life with the embarrassments which accompany it from the womb; you likewise, of course, loath it even after it is washed, when it is dressed-out in its swaddling-clothes, graced with repeated anointing, smiled on with nurse’s fawns. This reverend course of nature, you are, O Marcion, pleased to spit upon; and yet, in what way were you born? You detest a human being at its birth; then after what fashion do you love anybody?”

These words of so long ago sound frighteningly contemporary in this culture of death, when the Congress of the United States is debating the legality of infanticide.

Today this “dis-incarnation” is sought on behalf of an abstract “universality” that dissolves the Christian claim about the uniqueness of the man Jesus as the full and definitive revelation of God, turning Him into a catalyst that moves us to find God through the way he exemplified. Jesus is presented as the one who guides and focuses properly that quest of ours for ultimate meaning called the religious sense. In this case, wherever the religious sense is authentically pursued and lived, Jesus is held to be present within it, even if called by other names or imagined in ways other than as a concrete human being, the fruit of Mary’s womb.

But if the Answer to the religious quest is contained within it, only those who are “good at religion” can find it: only those with the interior resources to pursue adequately the religious quest, only those with exterior resources to purchase the time needed to pursue it, only those with the intellectual resources to grasp its concepts, in one word, the elites. And yet, it was not the elites who recognized Christ and followed Him. It was the poor, the sinners, those sick and wounded in the flesh. St. Augustine says that God came in the flesh to enable us to see His majesty by means of His humility. His glory no one can see unless healed by the humility of His flesh (Tractates on the Gospel of John). The Answer to the original and tormenting desires of the human heart expressed in the religious sense can be grasped only “by the humility of His flesh,” only those who embrace fully the humility of their flesh as He did can grasp it.

The flesh cannot be thought; it can only be felt, encountered, embraced, cared for, respected, healed. This is the place of the encounter with the Incarnate Mystery. Christian spirituality is not an escape from the flesh; it is an embrace of the humility of the flesh. St. Thomas Aquinas said the sacramental way of salvation is good because it forces us to accept the flesh, to find Christ with our flesh, rather than blame the flesh for our sins. That is how the Incarnation surpasses the boundaries of time and space to allow human beings everywhere and at all times to encounter Jesus Christ: not by escaping the limitations of the flesh, but by creating within history a “Body of flesh” for the Risen Lord where the event of the Incarnation is experienced, namely, the Church–the Church not as a vague, undefined, abstract reality, but as a people in the flesh in the midst of this world, living the humility of the flesh, placing Christ at its center, “incarnating” Christ in the world of human flesh. This is the motherhood of the Church, the continuation of Mary’s motherhood, by the power of the Holy Spirit. Hence, our Christmas prayer, the prayer of human flesh: Come, Holy Spirit! Come through Mary.

___________________________________________________ Dodge City has a reputation for evil and wickedness at night, but is quiet and practically respectable during the daylight hours.
-Father Boniface Verheyen, OSB, Monk of St. Benedict’s Abbey, Missionary and scholar.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Ascension

And he put all things beneath his feet
and gave him as head over all things to the church,
which is his body,
the fullness of the one who fills all things in every way.

Ephesians 1

Holy Hour Continues Through the Summer
Fr. Bruce Swift, OSB wanted to let everyone know that the Holy Hour on Saturday nights will continue during the summer months. Holy Hour is each Saturday from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. in in St Joseph Chapel, in the crypt of the Abbey Church.

Fr. Bruce serves as the Novice Master at St. Benedict’s Abbey, and a spiritual director to many of the students here at Benedictine College

Our founder, Father Lemke, promoting Benedictines
The following is part of an essay by our founder, Father Henry Lemke. His friend, Bishop Raess of Strassburg had the whole thing printed in the Mainz Catholic in 1835, 11 years before the Benedictines came to Latrobe, Pa (1846)
What would you think, my dear friends, if there were to come among such unique people, like-minded clerics and lay brothers, much in the manner of the Benedictines of old, clearing out forests, expounding knowledge and teaching crafts, praying and helping the community. The freedom to bring this about is here, and land to attain this is readily available.
The big question is, where will the money come from? If only the land can be bought, the rest will take care of itself. Those early religious foundations in our German forests did not come about by people arriving there in coaches; likewise, they didn’t, at the start, live in palace-like monasteries. (An aside: I wrote this above quote in the year 1834; one can see that already at that time I had the idea that was actually realized in the year 1846, and toward which I had already worked for eleven years by buying up a lot of land tracts, etc.)
Only in this way would it be possible to firmly establish Catholicism within the region, and, thereby, to deeply influence the local inhabitants. Everything else is nothing more than patchwork, believe you me, because I have come to learn it first-hand. For you (in the old country), don’t speak so much and do not preach so loudly about the flourishing of the Catholic church in America! They have the same sorry characteristics as the other religious sects, especially here in the states, and it will continue as such, as long as churches continue to form new sects.
One takes only a very limited view. One writes and quarrels continuously about things of which he has not a clue as to one side or the other. Its result is that one desires only the satisfaction of the present and the placating of what he perceives as his innate rights.
Meanwhile, life shapes itself under very different motives. I wouldn’t live in Philadelphia, or any other large city, for any amount of money. Had the likes of the earlier mentioned men of good will, who knew what they wanted, only once come up with an establishment like I proposed above, things would have been much different. Catholic families would have been drawn to such areas, unbelievers would either have become members of the true church, or they would have moved away from the region, and the young people would have been brought up in the framework of Catholic principles.” . . . etc.

BC Names Linda Henry as Dean of Students
Benedictine College is pleased to announce that Linda Henry has accepted the position of Dean of Students. She has been serving as the Associate Dean of Students and Director of Residence Life and served as the Interim Dean during the search process. She has more than 20 years of experience in higher education administration and has an extensive history with Benedictine College, starting with her college education. Linda has served as a residence hall director, co-director of student activities, director of the Career Development Center, summer housing director, and director of the EMBA program.

“Linda is so qualified for the position and has such a love for Benedictine College and Atchison, it would have been difficult to find anyone more perfectly suited to take on this important role for us,” said President Stephen D. Minnis. “She has a determination to succeed, extensive experience in student life and higher education management, and a real commitment to help build one of the great Catholic colleges in America.”

We all welcome her to her new position and offer her congratulations. Linda is currently in Chicago celebrating the birth of her second grandchild! Congratulations.
Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist
Next weekend I will be helping with the vocation retreat for the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist in Ann Arbor, Mi.
http://www.sistersofmary.org/ This dynamic community, started on February 9, 1997 with a Mass in St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York, by Cardinal John O’Connor, has quickly grown. Pray for the Sisters there, and for the retreat.

Communion and Liberation
Thousands of CL people gathered recently in Rimini, Italy for the annual CL Spiritual Exercises. http://www.clonline.us/ There will be a number of these exercises in the United States in the coming weeks. Pope Benedict is encouraged by the theme of this year’s exercises Christ, in His beauty, draws me to Him. He prays that these exercises of Communion and Liberation will give rise to faithfulness to Christ for a generous engagement in the new work of evangelization.

At our CL School of Community throughout the world, we are reading Monsignor Giussani’s The Journey to Truth is an Experience. A few quotes from that book that stand out:

take seriously our experience, and live our existence intensely,"
"acknowledge Him as the only possible answer to our human pathway" (p. 67).
"Adherence to Christianity, in as much as it is purely mechanical, has no value."

___________________________________________________ Dodge City has a reputation for evil and wickedness at night, but is quiet and practically respectable during the daylight hours.
-+Father Boniface Verheyen, OSB, Early Monk of St. Benedict’s Abbey, Missionary and scholar.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Father Michael Santa, OSB
Father Michael Santa, OSB, formerly an Education Professor at Benedictine College, Prior and Formation Director of the Abbey, is in the Atchison Hospital with an infection. Please keep him in your prayers.

Wangari’s Roommate and the Archabbey
I found out that one of the people who reads my updates is Florence Conrad Salisbury, the roommate, and friend at Mt. St Scholastica College of Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate.

Anyway, with my news of Father John-Mary Tompkins, OSB, a monk of the Archabbey being here for the funeral of Colonel Harrison, Florence wrote the following interesting note:
Once again, I have "connections." My Grandma Conrad was a Wirtner. She had two uncles who were monks at Latrobe. I never knew them, but I do remember seeing pictures of them when we visited Grandpap and Grandma Conrad in Pennsylvania. Years later when I decided to go to the Mount I always found it an interesting coincidence that I'd "joined" the Benedictines, having that long ago family connection.

Our Founder, a Man of the Church
The following quote is from the founder of our Abbey, Father Henry Lemke, OSB
The church, according to the command of Christ, is to be the teacher of mankind. I think it is on one of Satan’s priority lists, which he has saved for the end times, in which he deludes the eyes of the world’s rulers and incites them to bind the hands of the church in its role of education. It will be too late when the rulers of the land, after we have a total ruination of society, finally come around to saying what Frederick the Second said to his minister: “Create for me once again a religion in our land.”

Our Savior spoke words that carry the same message: “Feed my lambs.” These words weren’t for the Roman emperor, or Herod, or Pilate. He speaks these words even to the present day, but He does not speak to the all-powerful Kaiser of Germany, or to Queen Victoria, or to the reigning president of the United States. No, Christ spoke these words to Peter, and He speaks them still through the one who is the successor of Peter, and who cannot err. It is the Pope who is our true schoolmaster. And we Catholics, if we truly want to be Catholic and remain such, we dare not entrust our lambs to any other guidance.

Summer Events in Beautiful Atchison
A) FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholuc University Students) training on the campus of Benedictine College from late May through early July. The FOCUS missionaries from around the United States will be here on our campus for their annual training.

B) General Chapter of the American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monasteries will be here in June. Abbots and Priors from Benedictine Abbeys and Priories, as well as one delegate from each house will be here this includes:
St. Vincent Archabbey, Pa
St. John’s Abbey, Mn
St. Benedict’s Abbey, Ks
St. Mary’s Abbey, NJ
Belmont Abbey, NC
St. Bernard Abbey, Al
St. Procopius Abbey, Il
St. Gregory’s Abbey, Ok
St. Leo Abbey, Fl
Assumption Abbey, ND
St. Bede Abbey, Il
St. Peter’s Abbey, Canada
St. Martin’s Abbey, Wa
St. Anselm Abbey, NH
St. Andrew Abbey, Oh
Mount Savior Priory, NY
Newark Abbey, NJ
Teeyac Abbey, Mexico
San Antonio Abad, Puerto Rico
Mary Mother of the Church Abbey, Va.

C) Meeting of the leaders of Benedictine Universities from around the United States will be here in June.

D) Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day at the Abbey. Welcoming the Monks from our Priory in Mineiros, Brazil.

E) Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes,
Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding monastery, will be principal celebrant.

F) Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities for the Abbey’s 150th anniversary.
My Summer
Please remember me in your prayers with some upcoming events this summer:

May 26-27, I will be the priest for a vocation retreat with the wonderful Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist in Ann Arbor, Mi.
May 30-June1, I will be presenting a class to teachers from the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas on The Risk of Education and Monsignor Luigi Giussani.
June1-3, I will be leading the spiritual exercises for Communion and Liberation in Santa Barbara, Ca.
June 17-23, I will be the Secretary for the General Chapter of the American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monasteries.
July 14, Wedding of Ryan O’Grady, Ashley Hager, Cathedral, St. Louis, Mo.
July 20, I will be speaking about St. Benedict and his role in Europe, and the monk’s coming to Kansas, at the Institute of Theology for the Diocese of Wichita.
August 18, Welcoming new students to Benedictine College AND attending the ordination to the diaconate at St. Benedict’s Church here in Atchison of David Stecher for the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas by Archbishop Joseph Naumann.

__________________________________________________ The Holy Spirit aroused in the Church a movement, yours, that would witness the beauty of being Christians in an era in which the opinion was spreading that Christianity was something tiresome and oppressive to live. Fr. Giussani at that time set himself to reawaken in the youth the love for Christ “the Way, the Truth and the Life”, repeating that only He is the road toward the fulfillment of the deepest desires of man’s heart, and Christ saves us not despite our humanity, but through it.
-Pope Benedict XVI to Communion and Liberation Audience. March 24, 2007

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Entrusting a fallen hero to the Mercy of God

The Mass of Christian Burial and cemetery rites for Colonel James W. Harrison Jr. yesterday were beautiful. There is a nice picture on the front page of today’s (Tuesday) Kansas City Star of the color guard outside the main post chapel at Ft. Leavenworth before the funeral.

Father John-Mary Tompkins, OSB, a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa, and a graduate himself of the United States Military Academy at West Point celebrated the Mass and preached the homily. Father John-Mary and Colonel Harrison became good friend in Germany, where Father John-Mary was Godfather for two of the Harrison’s three sons, and was the stand-in sponsor for the third. Colonel Harrison is survived by his wife, Penni, and three sons, Braden, Ross, and Joshua.

Colonel Harrison’s most recent positions include:

Director of the School for Command Preparation at the Command and General Staff College
Commander, United States Disciplinary Barracks, Fort Leavenworth
Battalion Commander, 5th Military Police Battalion (CID), Kaiserlautern, Germany.

In Afghanistan, he was deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom on a Combined Security Transition Command in Afghanistan.
Sesquicentennial Moment

Yesterday as I was walking with Father John-Mary Tompkins, OSB, and the family, army officers, and friends of Colonel Harrison following the horse drawn carriage with his casket from the chapel to the cemetery I couldn’t help but think of the connection of Atchison and Leavenworth these past 150 years.

Bishop Jean Baptiste Miege, S.J., ordained the first priest in Kansas, Father Casimir Seitz, OSB, on April 27, 1857 (150 years ago). The ordination took place in Leavenworth.

Bishop Louis-Mary Fink, OSB a monk of the Abbey was the Bishop of Leavenworth for 35 years.

General William T. Sherman, the great-great grandfather of one of our current Benedictine College students, Linda Myers, was founder of what would become the Command School for the United States Army at Ft. Leavenworth. The following is from the webpage of the command school.

In 1881 the Commanding General of the Army, William, T. Sherman, created the institution that eventually established Fort Leavenworth's modern reputation-the School of Application for Infantry and Cavalry, forerunner of the Command and General Staff College.

Thoughtful Army officers had sought such a school for years because of the poor state of professional training in the officer corps. The majority of Army officers had been commissioned directly from civilian life, Civil War volunteer units, or the enlisted ranks. Even graduates of the U.S. Military Academy stagnated intellectually during service in small, isolated posts. Army officers became experts in small unit administration and operations necessary at such posts, but had little grasp of large unit tactics, strategy, or even English composition. Thus, some type of post-commissioning training was necessary to prepare the Army for future wars. Although artillery officers already had a school at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, Leavenworth was selected as the site to train the far more numerous officers of infantry and cavalry.

___________________________________________________ The Holy Spirit aroused in the Church a movement, yours, that would witness the beauty of being Christians in an era in which the opinion was spreading that Christianity was something tiresome and oppressive to live. Fr. Giussani at that time set himself to reawaken in the youth the love for Christ “the Way, the Truth and the Life”, repeating that only He is the road toward the fulfillment of the deepest desires of man’s heart, and Christ saves us not despite our humanity, but through it.
-Pope Benedict XVI to Communion and Liberation Audience. March 24, 2007

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



President Bush on Saint Benedict

Benedictine College Commencement

Pope Benedict XVI in Brazil

A Sesquicentennial Moment

(Bishop Tihen of Lincoln and Denver)

President Bush on Saint Benedict
President Bush spoke Friday at the commencement of the first Benedictine College in America, Saint Vincent, Latrobe, PA. Here is part of his address.
At the heart of these high ideals is the name Benedict. Benedict was the saint who set down a practical guide for community life -- and helped save Western civilization. Benedict was the inspiration for the man who came to this country to plant these ideals in American soil -- and founded this college. And Benedict was also the inspiration for the Pope, who took his name in tribute to the Benedictine ideals of charity and community that he believes the world needs now more than ever.

These ideals of charity and community have a special resonance for Americans. From the beginning, America has offered the world a new model for strong community life. In the early 19th century, a Frenchman named Alexis de Tocqueville visited the United States. He was impressed by the way Americans came together in voluntary associations to help out a neighbor in need. And in his book, "Democracy in America," he wrote something that captured the spirit of this great country. He said, "When an American asks for the co-operation of his fellow citizens, it is seldom refused. If some great and sudden calamity befalls a family, the purses of a thousand strangers are at once willingly opened."

De Tocqueville saw the good heart of America back in the early 19th century -- and we continue to see the good heart of America in the early 21st century. We see it in citizens who responded to the worst atrocity on our soil with acts of selflessness and compassion. We see it in the historic new commitments our nation has made to alleviate poverty and suffering -- by feeding the hungry and fighting malaria and working to end the scourge of HIV/AIDS on the continent of Africa.
-President George W. Bush speaking at the first Benedictine College in America, Saint Vincent, Friday, May 11, 2007, the Feast of the Holy Founders of the Benedictine Abbey of Cluny.

Lou Holtz and the 2007 Commencement
Benedictine College was blessed with the presence of Lou Holtz as the 2007 Commencement speaker. He was up at 6 AM on Saturday joining the monks for prayers. According to Ave Maria Mutual funds, a group that has Holtz on its Board of Directors: Lou Holtz is perhaps best known as the former University of Notre Dame head football coach. He led the Fighting Irish on a record-setting 23-game winning streak and won the 1988 National Championship. Coach Holtz is currently a football analyst for ESPN and a highly sought inspirational and motivational speaker. He is also a best selling author of three books including his most recent, Wins, Losses and Lessons, an August 2006 autobiography. He and his wife Beth have been married for over 45 years and have four children. > The two Valedictory addresses were given by Lindsey Brake, and Sr. Mary Guadalupe (School Sisters of Christ the King in Lincoln, Ne.) Both of them were beautiful in their thanks for the Catholic liberal arts eduaction they had received. Sr. Mary Guadalupe began and ended with one of my favorite Pope Benedict XVI quotes: Christ takes nothing, nothing, absolutely nothing away from our humanity, but gives us everything.

Pope Benedict XVI in Brazil
I had a chance to listen to part of the homily of Pope Benedict XVI at the Shrine of Our Lady of Aparecida in Brazil today. I am very impressed at how well the Holy Father is sticking to a simple message that is filled with the truth. Again and again he is returning to the theme that God is Love; that we encounter that love in the person of Christ, and not in ideology, but in an encounter with the Reality today. Of course in this season of Easter, the Holy Father emphasized in the homily the role of the Church and the Holy Spirit in allowing this encounter with Christ to become a reality today.

This coming fall I will be using the Holy Father’s new book Jesus of Nazareth in my Introduction to Theology course at Benedictine College. What sets apart Christian theology from other “pursuits for meaning” is precisely encountering the Sacred Humanity of Christ today.

Sesquicentennial Moment

One of the early priest graduates of St. Benedict’s College was Bishop J. Henry Tihen. Ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Saint Louis, he followed his friend Bishop Hennessy to work in the Diocese of Wichita as a priest; helping to start construction on the beautiful Cathedral there. On July 6, 1911 he was consecrated as Bishop of Lincoln, Ne, in Wichita, Kansas by Bishop Hennessy. He would help with the settlement of immigrants to Nebraska, before becoming the Bishop of Denver, Co. The tower at the John Paul II Evangelization Center for the Archdiocese of Denver is named in his honor, with a statue of him in the entryway.

Two mentors of Bishop Tihen while here at Saint Benedict’s College, and for whom he would travel back for their Requiem Masses, were Abbot Innocent Wolf, OSB, STD; and Father Boniface Verheyen, OSB, who translated the Rule of Saint Benedict. Bishop Tihen is a great example of how the Saint Benedict’s Abbey have always encouraged graduates of our college to pursue the Diocesan priesthood, and make a difference in the world.

___________________________________________________ The Holy Spirit aroused in the Church a movement, yours, that would witness the beauty of being Christians in an era in which the opinion was spreading that Christianity was something tiresome and oppressive to live. Fr. Giussani at that time set himself to reawaken in the youth the love for Christ “the Way, the Truth and the Life”, repeating that only He is the road toward the fulfillment of the deepest desires of man’s heart, and Christ saves us not despite our humanity, but through it
-Pope Benedict XVI to Communion and Liberation Audience. March 24, 2007

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Pope Benedict XVI to the Youth

Lou Holtz to Youth

Cardinal Bertone to Bishops and Pastors

+Colonel Jim Harrison, RIP

Pope Benedict XVI to Youth in Brazil

At this point, I turn once more to you, young people, because I want to hear you give the same response that the young man in the Gospel gave: all these I have observed from my youth. The young man in the Gospel was good. He kept the commandments. He was walking along the way of God. Jesus, therefore, gazing at him, loved him. By recognizing that Jesus was good, he showed that he too was good. He had an experience of goodness, and therefore of God. And you, young people of Brazil and Latin America, have you already discovered what is good? Do you follow the Lord's commandments? Have you discovered that this is the one true road to happiness?

These years of your life are the years which will prepare you for your future. Your "tomorrow" depends much on how you are living the "today" of your youth. Stretching out in front of you, my dear young friends, is a life that all of us hope will be long; yet it is only one life, it is unique: do not let it pass it vain; do not squander it. Live it with enthusiasm and with joy, but most of all, with a sense of responsibility.

Many times, we who are pastors feel a sense of trepidation as we take stock of the situation in today's world. We hear talk of the fears of today's youth. These fears reveal an enormous lack of hope: a fear of death, at the very moment when life is blossoming and the young are searching to find how to fulfil their potential; fear of failure, through not having discovered the meaning of life; fear of remaining detached in the face of a disconcerting acceleration of events and communications. We see the high death rate among young people, the threat of violence, the deplorable proliferation of drugs which strike at the deepest roots of youth today. For these reasons, we hear talk of a "lost youth".

But as I gaze at you young people here present -- you who radiate so much joy and enthusiasm -- I see you as Christ sees you: with a gaze of love and trust, in the certainty that you have found the true way. You are the youth of the Church. I send you out, therefore, on the great mission of evangelizing young men and women who have gone astray in this world like sheep without a shepherd. Be apostles of youth. Invite them to walk with you, to have the same experience of faith, hope, and love; to encounter Jesus so that they may feel truly loved, accepted, able to realize their full potential. May they too discover the sure ways of the commandments, and, by following them, come to God.

A Teen's Game Plan for Life Lou Holtz

(Lou Holtz will be the speaker at our 2007 Benedictine College Commencement.)
After decades of helping to mold teenagers into adults as a highly successful football coach, including a national championship as the coach of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, Lou Holtz shares a common sense message with teens in an easily understood game plan for life. He speaks clearly and persuasively to a generation that is “being asked to make important decisions that have adult consequences earlier than any previous generation.” “In today’s social climate,” he tells them, “ your ability to know how to make good decisions becomes more important than ever before.”

Lou Holtz is a highly sought-after speaker and author who for years has challenged and motivated adults. Now in a book that parents will want for their teen-age children he spells out his tested, proven game plan for life. Teens that want to define their life goals and then go about reaching them will want to read A Teen’s Game Plan For Life.

Cardinal Bertone: Pastors Need to Be Welcoming

Says This Will Stop People From Leaving Catholicism
SĂO PAULO, Brazil, MAY 10, 2007 (Zenit.org).- The phenomenon of people leaving Catholicism poses "serious questions to the Church," says Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone.

Cardinal Bertone, in Brazil with Benedict XVI, spoke to Vatican Radio today about the growth of sects in Latin America and people leaving the Church to join Protestant communities.

"Unfortunately, sects represent a phenomenon that not only afflicts the Latin American continent but North America and Europe as well," he said.

"The Church is called -- as the Lord himself said and as we hear repeated in the Gospel -- to a continual process of conversion to her Lord," the Vatican secretary of state explained. "It is a process of purification and renewal.

"The problem -- and I always say this to bishops and priests -- is a problem of bishops and priests being able to welcome and listen to people."

Cardinal Bertone pointed to the example of current and previous pastors of the Church.

He encouraged "being close to people, being welcoming -- as the great saints who were bishops have taught us, and as Pope John Paul II spoke about in his autobiography when he said: 'I have tried and I try to be welcoming, to be near people.'

"And how Pope Benedict XVI teaches us in his ability to listen, his closeness to people -- the people he meets, even just for a moment, during audiences, feel transfigured because they have the perception of being treated as a friend, as if you were meeting with old friends."

"This is a very beautiful thing. It is a teaching," Cardinal Bertone said. "It is also a simple but effective way to stop this exodus of our Catholic Christians."

+Jim Harrison
Colonel Jim Harrison from Ft. Leavenworth died in Afghanistan this last week. He leaves behind Penni and three sons. Father John-Mary Tompkins, OSB, a monk at St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa, will be coming out to have the funeral Mass on Monday. I was friends with Father John-Mary from my seminary days. He is a graduate of West Point, and was stationed in Germany with Jim. Father John-Mary is the Godfather of two of the Harrisons sons. Please remember the soul of Jim in your prayers, and beg Our Lady of Fatima in your daily Rosaries to bring peace to our world through her Immaculate Heart!

___________________________________________________ The Holy Spirit aroused in the Church a movement, yours, that would witness the beauty of being Christians in an era in which the opinion was spreading that Christianity was something tiresome and oppressive to live. Fr. Giussani at that time set himself to reawaken in the youth the love for Christ “the Way, the Truth and the Life”, repeating that only He is the road toward the fulfillment of the deepest desires of man’s heart, and Christ saves us not despite our humanity, but through it.
-Pope Benedict XVI to Communion and Liberation Audience. March 24, 2007

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Lemke and Sailer

Brownback and Benedictine

Pope John Paul II and Saint Benedict

Pope Benedict XVI and CL

Sesquicentennial Moment

Lemke and Sailer
Yesterday I came across a book on the theology of Pope Benedict XVI. There were four citations in the book about Bishop Johann Michael Sailer, the man responsible for the conversion of the founder of our Abbey, Father Henry Lemke, OSB. Sailer was a man who would have a profound effect 150 years later on the lives of Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI.

One of the interesting aspects of Sailer’s pastoral writings that appealed to our current Holy Father was his preference of a “Theology of the Heart” over a mere moralism. There was another professor in Bavaria in the early 19th century by the name of Fingerlos whose pastoral theology was based on a moralism that did not have near the appeal as the personal approach of Sailer.

As Lemke recounts, Sailer’s “spiritual banner” reached from the Baltic Sea to the Swiss Mountains. In other words, he personified what was good about German pastoral theology at the time. The following are quotes of our founder, Father Lemke, concerning his own discovery of Bishop Johann Michael (JM) Sailer.

Sailer... already at that time (1822) had been consecrated Bishop and, in a way, held in his hand a spiritual banner that reached all the way from the Baltic Sea to the Swiss mountains.
During this time, I corresponded most regularly with my friend Adler. He was always in good spirits, and told me much about Sailer and the way the faith was expressed in Catholic Bavaria. And he sent me pamphlets that were not permitted to be handled by book dealers in North Germany. First of all, I can say that I have shaken the dust from my feet, and have allowed the dead to bury their dead. I have not been a Protestant for quite some time now, but I am also not yet a Catholic. Toward that end, I need to live in a Catholic environment for a while and see if I might be able to rid myself of many scruples (Lemke talking to his new friend Melchior Diepenbrock, who would go on to become the Cardinal Archbishop of Breslau, Germany, after World War II the city was given to Poland and re-named “Wroclaw”)
In... Sailer’s “Biography”, it is clearly stated how Sailer, that old “fisher of men”, had, on the occasion when he was on a trip to Westfalen and had stopped in at the Diepenbrock family home, had won over this addle-brained child of the world into service for Christ. He had completed his theology studies here at the university of Landshut and was presently here at Regensburg, near to Sailer, and preparing for the priesthood. Never has a person so impressed me as did Diepenbrock, and there developed between us an inner and deeply binding relationship,

Senator Brownback to speak on campus tomorrow

U.S. Senator Sam Brownback will bring his presidential campaign home to
Kansas tomorrow, Saturday, May 5, 2007. His organization, Students for
Brownback, has scheduled a stop Saturday afternoon on the campus of Benedictine College. The event will begin at 4 p.m. with a "meet and greet" in the MCI, then Sen. Brownback will address the crowd in front of the Haverty Center at 4:30 p.m.

All are welcome.

Pope John Paul II on the 1500th anniversary
Of St. Benedict’s Monastery at Subiaco, 1999
(We’re 1/10 of the way there in Kansas.)
At the heart of St Benedict's monastic experience is a Simple, typically Christian principle, which the monk adopts in all its radicalness: to unify one's life around the primacy of God. This "tenere in unum", the first, fundamental condition for entering monastic life, must be the commitment unifying the life of the individual and the community, and be expressed in the "conversatio morum" which is fidelity to a life-style lived concretely in daily obedience. The search for Gospel simplicity requires continual examination, that is, the effort "to do the truth", by constantly returning to the initial gift of the divine call which is at the root of one's own religious experience.

This commitment, which is part of the Benedictine life, is particularly called for by the celebrations of the 1,500th anniversary of the monastery's foundation, which falls during the Great Jubilee of the Year 2000. The Book of Leviticus prescribes: "You shall hallow the fiftieth year, and proclaim liberty throughout the land to all its inhabitants; it shall be a jubilee for you, when each of you shall return to his property and each of you shall return to his family" (25:10). The invitation to return to one's own "heredity", to one's own family, is especially timely for the Benedictine monastic community, called to live the Jubilee of its 15th centuries of life and that of the Holy Year as a favourable time for a renewed fidelity to the "heredity", of the holy Patriarch by acquiring a deeper sense of his original charism.

Pope Benedict XVI on Communion and Liberation
The Holy Spirit aroused in the Church a movement, yours, that would witness the beauty of being Christians in an era in which the opinion was spreading that Christianity was something tiresome and oppressive to live. Fr. Giussani at that time set himself to reawaken in the youth the love for Christ “the Way, the Truth and the Life”, repeating that only He is the road toward the fulfillment of the deepest desires of man’s heart, and Christ saves us not despite our humanity, but through it.
-Pope Benedict XVI, March 24, 2007, Audience with Communion and Liberation

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



From the Gospel for Today’s Feast of SS. Philip and James

Philip said to him,
“Master, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us.”
Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you for so long a time
and you still do not know me, Philip?
Whoever has seen me has seen the Father.
How can you say, ‘Show us the Father’?
Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me?

A Sesquicentennial Moment
An example of the influence of the monks of the Abbey over these 150 years is Br. Martin Fiffe, known as Pierre Fiffe, of University of Notre Dame (Br. Martin died on April 10, 1934). A native of Aurora, Ks, and graduate of St. Benedict’s College here in Atchison, Br. Martin joined the Brothers of the Holy Cross and dedicated the remaining 20 years of his short life to serving as a dorm prefect at the University of Notre Dame, and directing the modernization of the printing press there.

The intervening twenty years saw Brother Martin develop into one of the most thorough-minded work-men and thorough-going religious at Notre Dame. A Model of fidelity to duty and a keen minded workman, he made over the Ave Maria press-room and equipped it as a thoroughly modern establishment. And after the day's work was over, he took up his duties as prefect in St. Edward's Hall. -From the Notre Dame archives

He (Br. Martin) was a fine religious man, was an amiable personality, and was popular in the Community. He was an excellent worker, and the efficiency of the printing room was considerably increased under his leadership.-John Francis Cardinal O’Hara, CSC, Formerly Vice-President of the University of Notre Dame; later, Cardinal Archbishop of Philadelphia, 1951-1960

Around the Abbey

When I was a young monk (22 years ago) there were six things that many people said would probably never happen. They are:
Renovating the Monastery, including air conditioning. On my first day here for my pre-novitiate retreat in 1985 only the Church, guesthouse, and community room had any air conditioning. The main renovation of the monastery occurred in 1989, beginning on Easter Monday and continuing through the Fall.
Finishing the pipe organ. Ernest White, one of the finest organ designers of his day, had worked with our Gregorian chant master, Father Anselm to design the pipe organ. The antiphonal and choir pipes were not added until nearly 45 years after the main organ.
Making the Church and guesthouse more friendly to people with disabilities. This was completed just this Spring Having some sort of bell system in the tower. The current system was a gift of Archbishop Keleher and the priests of the Archdiocese on the occasion of the blessing of Abbot Barnabas in 1994
Putting together a new Liturgy of the Hours that was user friendly. The final book for this was introduced on the Feast of Saint Benedict, July 11, 1989 Consecrating the Church. Many said that since this was not done in 1957 it would probably never be done. Of course all who were here last Sunday not only know that it was done, but what a beautiful job Archbishop Naumann and everyone did to make the liturgy so beautiful.

As Archbishop Naumann pointed out last Sunday, these things don’t just happen. He specifically mentioned the hard work of Abbot Barnabas. I also know that Abbot Barnabas and Father Maurice continue to be wise stewards of the gifts given to the monks. May they continue to be blessed in their work!

BC Director featured on Catholic Exchange
Matthew Tsakanikas had the feature article yesterday on Catholic Exchange http://www.catholicexchange.com/ . The article was titled “Is Man to Become God?” Since it was the Feast of the great Doctor of the Church, St. Athanasius, the article looked at the teaching of many of the Fathers of the Church on “Deification.”

Matthew serves as the director of the Benedictine College Institute for Religious Studies, an outreach program for the theological formation of Catholic school teachers in Kansas. Visit www.benedictine.edu/irs to learn about the program.

Matthew ends the article with the following statement:
It is all actually very simple. God always wanted to share all that he is with us. Take the following quotations of Sacred Scripture: "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God...And the Word became flesh and dwelt amongst us" (John 1:1&14); "To those who did accept him he gave power to become children of God" (John 1:12); "That you may come to share in the divine nature" (2 Peter 1:4). Saint Athanasius summed them up thus: "The Son of God became man so that man might become God" (CCC #460).

_______________________________________________________________ (Blessed) Mother Teresa replied, 'It is Jesus to whom we do everything; we love Jesus.' Cardinal Hamer rightly writes, 'In this way, a fact that happened two thousand years ago becomes- what a paradox-the most clamorous and interesting novelty in the life today of so many young people' -in the life today of so many young people, of Mother Teresa, or our life, our time, our age. Mother Teresa was not a youngster, but she was certainly young at heart.
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, From a talk at the Basilica of St. Anthony of Padua, Italy, February 11, 1994.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



May Crowning

Last evening, May 1, Fr. Brendan Rolling, OSB presided at a May crowning of the statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary in front of the Benedictine College library. Amy Minnis, the wife of our college president, has done a great job of fixing up the area and planting plants and flowers to honor our Blessed Mother.

The Rosary of the Virgin Mary, which gradually took form in the second millennium under the guidance of the Spirit of God, is a prayer loved by countless Saints and encouraged by the Magisterium. Simple yet profound, it still remains, at the dawn of this third millennium, a prayer of great significance, destined to bring forth a harvest of holiness.
-Pope John Paul II

Bringing the Light of Christ to the Archdiocese

The Institute of Religious Studies for the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas is headquartered here at Benedictine College. The new director, Matthew Tsakanikas, STL, has a great line up of classes. Go to the following site to find out more: http://www.benedictine.edu/irs

The Church has always considered catechesis one of her primary tasks, for, before Christ ascended to His Father after His resurrection, He gave the apostles a final command - to make disciples of all nations and to teach them to observe all that He had commanded. He thus entrusted them with the mission and power to proclaim to humanity what they had heard, what they had seen with their eyes, what they had looked upon and touched with their hands, concerning the Word of Life. He also entrusted them with the mission and power to explain with authority what He had taught them, His words and actions, His signs and commandments. And He gave them the Spirit to fulfill this mission.
-Pope John Paul II

The Wisdom of the Elders

As I wrote in my Friday update, Father Gilbert Wolters, OSB, Ph.D. was part of a Benedictine movement to educate people concerning the Church’s teaching on marriage and human life. Father Gilbert just turned 100 a month ago today. In 1998 he wrote:
Lot’s of people are doing it (using contraception) and we’ve fallen to a much lower level of social maturity. Bishops will have to do more. Father Gilbert Wolters, O.S.B., Ph.D.

Communion and Liberation

Monsignor Luigi Giussani, The Miracle of a Change. Annual Spiritual Exercises of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, Rimini, 1998.
Readings » The Five "Without's"
God Without Christ

“The first consequence of rationalism can be summarized in the formula, God without Christ. It’s the denial of the fact that only through Christ is it possible for God, the Mystery, to reveal Himself to us for what He is. God without Christ, or fideism, characterizes all the positions that, by eliminating the reasonability of faith, presume to define God as the idolatry of a particular, felt or inherited from a particular ethnic or cultural tradition, or fixed by one’s own imagination” (L. Giussani, The Miracle of a Change, p. 32).

Christ Without the Church

“The second consequence: Christ without the Church. If the first aspect can be identified with fideism, the second aspect that is its immediate consequence can be called gnosis, or gnosticism, in any of its versions.

If you eliminate from Christ the fact of being man, real, historical man, then you also eliminate the possibility of a Christian experience. A Christian experience is a human experience, so it is made of time and space just like every other material reality. Without this aspect of the materiality, then the experience that man has of Christ lacks a way of verifying Him in the present, of finding out whether what He said of Himself is true.

The elimination of the carnality implied in every human experience, even in Jesus Christ’s own experience, draws Christ and the Church back into an abstraction, reducing Him to just one among the many religious models.

The modern world’s incapacity to accept Christianity is identified with this denial” (cf. The Miracle of a Change, pp. 32-33).

Church Without the World

“The third aspect of the effect that the rationalistic world has brought into our ecclesial life, both individual and collective, is a Church without the world. This is where clericalism and spiritualism come from, as a twofold reduction of the value of the Church as Body of Christ. Christian religious life comes to be determined by statism, which in a unilateral way is also known as ‘clericalism.’ Thus, Christian religiosity lives in an environment of rules conceived in a legalistic way (pharisaism). In this way, Christians have in effect become agents of a power (civil, political, or religious).
‘Spiritualism’ is faith set alongside life so that faith is no longer the reason enlightening life and the force at work in it. Every kind of spiritualism cannot but speak of Christ’s resurrection in a sentimental way: the devotion of a remembrance, not the memory of a presence. In this view, Christ is not really risen in His body?the Resurrection is not something present; salvation is not something already begun. Salvation is conceived of ‘eschatologically,’ only on the last day. In this way, we empty salvation of what is human, as it is defined by faith, for faith announces, tends to achieve, and as far as possible attains salvation in the present. Faith announces the salvation of a present. If we restrict salvation to the end of time, then we destroy the reasonability of faith?in other words, the humanity of faith and the human concreteness of our relationship with Christ and, finally, the very reason for the Church in the world, the Christian’s identity in the world. This would make of the Church, not the protagonist, but the courtesan of cultural, social, and political history”(cf. The Miracle of a Change, pp. 34-36).

World Without an “I”

“From a Church without the world, a world without an ‘I.’ This is the fourth ‘without’ in which we group our reflections of our present-day situation.
If the Church is without the world, this world tends to be without an ‘I.’ In other words, it is an alienation. This world has alienation as its characteristic and outcome, whether foreseen or not, whether wanted or not; it is normally wanted by the power, by those who have the cultural power in a given moment.
Thus, synthetically, the world ends up being the ambit of existence defined by power and its laws. Whereas the world is the ambit where Christ brings about, in time, the redemption of man and of history. In the rationalist dissolution or antithesis, the world is reduced to the ambit of existence defined by power and its laws, which become instruments of violence.
The extreme consequence of an existence defined by power and its laws is the loss of freedom, the ignoring or the abolition of freedom, an abolition not proclaimed theoretically, but practiced in fact: and since freedom, however you define it, is the face of the human ‘I,’ it’s really a question of the loss of the human person. In fact, it is called alienation” (cf. The Miracle of a Change, pp. 36-38).

“I” Without God

“This ‘I,’ the alienated ‘I,’ is an ‘I’ without God. The ‘I’ without God is an ‘I’ that cannot avoid boredom and nausea. So we let ourselves go on living: either we feel ourselves tiny parts of the whole (pantheism) or we are prey to despair (the prevalence of evil and of nothingness: nihilism).” (cf. The Miracle of a Change, p. 38).

___________________________________________________ The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other.
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



The Springtime of faith through Jesus of Nazareth

Here are the numbers on Pope Benedict XVI new book, Jesus of Nazareth. In some 10 days after its release,

510,000 thousand copies have been sold in Italy
480,000 in Germany
100,000 in Poland
The book will be released in the United States on May 15. You can order from Amazon, or fine Catholic book stores in your area.
I will be using this book as one of my texts for Introduction to Theology here at Benedictine College. When St. Benedict tells us to prefer nothing whatever to the love of Christ, it is good to know who Christ is. Often Christ gets lost as a distant ideological figure, Reviews of this book indicate that this work will restore a sanity to our view of who Christ is and why that is important.

The Greek edition comes with a letter by the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I, who expresses great and burning interest for the work. He sees it as being a help to ecumenical dialogue.

This adds to a growing interest in orthodoxy for the writings of our current Holy Father. You might recall I had mentioned earlier that Pope Benedict’s early writing Introduction to Christianity was released in Russian with high praise from the Russian Orthodox Church. May the Lord bring about a great reunion of the Church in our day.

I can’t help but think that many of our Protestants brothers and sisters will also appreciate the love Pope Benedict XVI has for Jesus of Nazareth.

The Springtime of Faith in Atchison on a Spring day
Saint Scholastica, known for her intercession ability with the weather, pulled off an amazingly beautiful spring day yesterday for the official opening of the Sesquicentennial (150 years) of our Abbey. Nearly 500 of the faithful joined Abbot Barnabas, the monks and our beloved Archbishop Naumann for a beautiful Mass in the Abbey Church, at which time the altar was officially consecrated. This was followed by the re-naming of the Administration Building here at Benedictine College as St. Benedict Hall in honor of our Holy Father, Saint Benedict, and all the monks who have been members of the Abbey in the past 150 years.

The Springtime of faith through beauty
I received an e-mail today from a Mr. David Clayton, a friend of our Communion and Liberation friend Dr. Damian Bacich from California.

David Clayton

has a Masters degree in engineering has studied Byzantine iconography has gone on to study western art in Florence
is part of an organization called ResSource ( ) which is based in Oxford, England and is devoted, through summer schools, seminars, publications etc, to the reestablishment of a Catholic culture of beauty in the West. They are running summer schools this year teaching traditional art skills (naturalistic drawing, Byzantine iconography, sacred geometry), as well as a class on an analysis of the Catholicism of Shakespeare.

Anyway, Mr. Clayton was in Los Angeles promoting his art program there at Oxford when Damian Bacich told him to contact me. I invite readers to go to the above mentioned website for more information. Please pass this on to friends who may be interested

Message from our friend in Texas

I had mentioned that a BC parent from Texas was asking prayers for a boy named Trey. The following is the latest:
You may check on the progress of Trey Green, the little 3 yr. old boy with Neuroblastoma, by going online to caringbridge.com On the left side of the page click the arrow that says "visit". Another page will come up asking for the site name; type in treygreen

Thank you so much for the prayers. Here is a novena that you could possible do. Our beloved John Paul II needs another miracle accredited to his intercession for canonization.

"Oh Lord, You are constantly at work in your Church and, through individuals and communities, You manifest your Spirit for the good of your people. In a special way way You bestowed Your spirit on Blessed John Paul II so that he might live fully according to the Gospel and with love devote himself to Your saving work.
You have inspired many men, women and children to follow his example by consecrating themselves to You, through the sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of your Mother and in union with your legal Father, St. Joseph. We know ask you to give us visible signs of your grace and holiness in his life by granting this special favor, the healing of Trey Green. May the Father, the Son, and the Holy spirit be glorified in all places for all time."

___________________________________________________ The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other.
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Sesquicentennial Celebration

It was 150 years ago today that Prior Augustine Wirth, OSB, Fr. Casimir Seitz, OSB, and Father Henry Lemke, OSB met up in Doniphan, KS for the first time. Father Henry had thought that Doniphan (now a ghost town north of Atchison) might be the next Cincinnati or St. Louis.

The official beginning of our 150th sesquicentennial celebration will be this Sunday, April 29, 2007, as the monks invite our students and friends to a Solemn Mass at 2 PM in the Abbey Church celebrated by The Most Reverend Joseph Naumann, Archbishop of Kansas City in Kansas; along with The Right Reverend Barnabas Senecal, OSB, Abbot of St. Benedict’s Abbey, and the monks and other priests concelebrating.

Following Mass, everyone is invited to join a procession to the Administration building which will be named St. Benedict Hall, in honor of our Holy Father St. Benedict.

Monks and Civilization

In the 1950s two priests in two different countries were busy developing a method of educating married couples, and couples preparing for marriage concerning the great vocation they were undertaking. According to George Weigel in his biography of Pope John Paul II, Witness to Hope, the future Holy Father was busy establishing a marriage preparation program for couples in his native Poland in the 1950s.

At the same time, a monk of our Abbey, Father Edgar Schmiedler, OSB, Ph.D. was establishing in the United States the first courses on marriage, and marriage preparation. Both Pope John Paul II and Father Edgar Schiedler, OSB, saw the danger in a culture that was moving toward birth control, and away from an authentic understanding of life and love in the marriage covenant.

Father Edgar wrote, or edited, the following books, along with several others:

In 1931, The Century Company of New York, published a book edited by our Father Edgar, OSB entitled Readings on the Family. It was a 513 page compilation of essays by leading churchmen of the day, including the Holy Father.
In 1943, Fr. Edgar Schiedler, OSB, had a book published by The Our Sunday Visitor Press entitled 25 Years of Uncontrol. It looked at the work of the Birth Control Federation of America, which would later become Planned Parenthood. Father Edgar said that already in the early 1940s, because of birth control, the number of students in schools in the United States had dropped by 2,000,000 in just 10 years.
In 1946, Fr. Edgar Schiedler, OSB had a 273 page book published by McGraw Hill entitled Marriage and the Family. It was the first textbook of its kind to be used in college classrooms to study marriage.
In 1955, Father Edgar Schiedler, OSB, helped put together a 165 page Marriage preparation series for Catholic in the United States. This book came with an Imprimatur by Cardinal O’Boyle of Washington, D.C., and a Nihil Obstat by the famous American Catholic Church historian, and one time professor at Mount St. Scholastica College here in Atchison, Father John Tracy Ellis.

It is only natural that a Benedictine monk would be involved in this. Other monks of recent memory who helped to educate people concerning the beautiful teaching of the Church include

Father Bernard Sause, OSB, S.T.D., J.C.D. who wrote and taught much on both the monastic life, and the married vocation.
Father Valerian Berger, OSB who wrote an early marriage preparation for Paulist Press.
Father Gilbert Wolters, OSB, Ph.D. Father Gilbert just turned 100 years old on April 2. He has known all 8 Abbots of our monastery, and has served as Dean of the college and professor of sociology.
Father Paul Marx, OSB, Ph.D., monk of St. John’s Abbey Collegeville who founded Human Life International
Father Matthew Habiger, OSB, Ph.D. former President of Human Life International. Father Matthew travels the country giving talks on God’s plan for life and love.

Pope Pius XII mentioned that Benedictine monks have always been involved in the development of culture. In his Encyclical letter on St. Benedict, Fulgens Radiator, Pope Pius XII wrote the following:

All who are not blinded by prejudice but examine events in the light of history and judge fairly, must recognize what a beneficial influence the power and strength of the Benedictine Order had in that early period, and how many great benefits it conferred on succeeding generations. For besides the fact, as We said already, that the sons of Benedict were almost alone in that dark age of profound ignorance and turmoil, in preserving the codices of literature and learning, in translating them most faithfully and commenting on them, they were also among the pioneers in practicing and promoting the arts, science and teaching.

On April 20, 1993, Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete was asked to give a lecture at Christendom College on the 25th anniversary of Humanae Vitae. Monsignor Albacete ended his lecture with the following statement:

Can history ever flow against the current of conscience? This is the question facing us in our country today. As long as the teaching of Humanae Vitae is not accepted, the degeneration and destruction of man which it foresaw will continue. We must learn this: intelligence is not enough. We must love.

In his preface for the small version of RB80, our Father Timothy Fry, OSB, Ph.D., (who just died this past January 20) wrote:

Pope John Paul II addressed two documents in 1981 to the entire Catholic Church and to all men and women of good will. Inspired by a most urgent desire to help people improve their basic human relations, he wrote the encyclical On Human Work and the apostolic exhortation The Role of the Family in Modern society. St. Benedict’s times were as turbulent as our own, though for very different reasons. He wrote his Rule primarily for monks, but its sound principles for working together and living together have proved relevant to people of all classes of society through fifteen hundred years.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Our 150th Anniversary

Liturgical wisdom from our founder,
Father Henry Lemke, OSB

Prayer requests
Our 150th anniversary

The 150th anniversary of the founding of St. Benedict’s Abbey begins this coming Sunday, April 29, with the Solemn Mass celebrated by Archbishop Joseph Naumann at 2:00 PM in the Abbey Church. We will recall, at the sacrifice of the Mass, what a milestone this date is in our history, and humbly thank God for all His blessings.

Our founder, Father Henry Lemke, as well as others, often commented on the trait of humility found in Prince Demetrius Gallitzin. This is significant because Prince Gallitzin gave up what today would amount to a $10,000,000 inheritance (according to Bishop Trautman of Eerie) in order to humbly serve as a priest, a pastor, a man who because of his deep love for Christ also had a deep love for humanity. It was often commented that Prince Gallitzin was born into one of the highest classed families of Europe, and died a simple Roman Catholic priest servant of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in Pennsylvania.

It was the life of Prince Gallitzin that inspired the early founders of our monastic congregation. Men like Archabbot Boniface Wimmer, and our own founder Father Henry Peter Balthasar Lemke. They were inspired to leave behind all, in the example of the great cloud of witnesses described in the 11th Chapter of the Letter to the Hebrew, to go forth in faith, and trusting that God would remain faithful.

St. Benedict speaks often of humiity throughout the Rule. The following quotes are from a translation of the Holy Rule by one of our pioneer monks, Father Boniface Verheyen, OSB.

(Chapter II) We are distinguished with Him in this respect alone, if we are found to excel others in good works and in humility. Therefore, let him (the Abbot) have equal charity for all, and impose a uniform discipline for all according to merit.
(Chapter V) The first degree of humility is obedience without delay.
(Chapter VI) If, therefore, anything must be asked of the Superior, let it be asked with all humility and respectful submission.
(Chapter VII) Without a doubt, we understand this ascending and descending to be nothing else but that we descend by pride and ascend by humility.
The first degree of humility, then, is that a man always have the fear of God before his eyes (cf Ps 35[36]:2), shunning all forgetfulness and that he be ever mindful of all that God hath commanded, that he always considereth in his mind how those who despise God will burn in hell for their sins, and that life everlasting is prepared for those who fear God.
The second degree of humility is, when a man loveth not his own will, nor is pleased to fulfill his own desires but by his deeds carrieth out that word of the Lord which saith: "I came not to do My own will but the will of Him that sent Me" (Jn 6:38). It is likewise said: "Self-will hath its punishment, but necessity winneth the crown."
The third degree of humility is, that for the love of God a man subject himself to a Superior in all obedience, imitating the Lord, of whom the Apostle saith: "He became obedient unto death" (Phil 2:8).
The fourth degree of humility is, that, if hard and distasteful things are commanded, nay, even though injuries are inflicted, he accept them with patience and even temper, and not grow weary or give up, but hold out, as the Scripture saith: "He that shall persevere unto the end shall be saved" (Mt 10:22).
The fifth degree of humility is, when one hideth from his Abbot none of the evil thoughts which rise in his heart or the evils committed by him in secret, but humbly confesseth them.

The sixth degree of humility is, when a monk is content with the meanest and worst of everything.
The seventh degree of humility is, when, not only with his tongue he declareth, but also in his inmost soul believeth, that he is the lowest and vilest of men, humbling himself and saying with the Prophet: "But I am a worm and no man, the reproach of men and the outcast of the people"
The eighth degree of humility is, when a monk doeth nothing but what is sanctioned by the common rule of the monastery and the example of his elders.
The ninth degree of humility is, when a monk withholdeth his tongue from speaking, and keeping silence doth not speak until he is asked; for the Scripture showeth that "in a multitude of words there shall not want sin" (Prov 10:19); and that "a man full of tongue is not established in the earth" (Ps 139[140]:12).
The tenth degree of humility is, when a monk is not easily moved and quick for laughter, for it is written: "The fool exalteth his voice in laughter" (Sir 21:23).
The eleventh degree of humility is, that, when a monk speaketh, he speak gently and without laughter, humbly and with gravity, with few and sensible words, and that he be not loud of voice, as it is written: "The wise man is known by the fewness of his words."
The twelfth degree of humility is, when a monk is not only humble of heart, but always letteth it appear also in his whole exterior to all that see him; namely, at the Work of God, in the garden, on a journey, in the field, or wherever he may be, sitting, walking, or standing, let him always have his head bowed down, his eyes fixed on the ground, ever holding himself guilty of his sins, thinking that he is already standing before the dread judgment seat of God, and always saying to himself in his heart what the publican in the Gospel said, with his eyes fixed on the ground: "Lord, I am a sinner and not worthy to lift up mine eyes to heaven" (Lk 18:13);

Having, therefore, ascended all these degrees of humility, the monk will presently arrive at that love of God, which being perfect, casteth out fear (1 Jn 4:18)

(Chapter XX) If we do not venture to approach men who are in power, except with humility and reverence, when we wish to ask a favor, how much must we beseech the Lord God of all things with all humility and purity of devotion?
(Chapter XIX) If a brother, who through his own fault leaveth the monastery or is expelled, desireth to return, let him first promise full amendment of the fault for which he left; and thus let him be received in the last place, that by this means his humility may be tried. If he should leave again, let him be received even a third time, knowing that after this every means of return will be denied him.
(Chapter XXXI) If a brother should perchance request anything of him (The business manager, or cellerer in the words of the Rule) unreasonably let him not sadden the brother with a cold refusal, but politely and with humility refuse him who asketh amiss.
(Chapter XLV) If anyone whilst he reciteth a psalm, a responsory, an antiphon, or a lesson, maketh a mistake, and doth not humble himself there before all by making satisfaction, let him undergo a greater punishment, because he would not correct by humility what he did amiss through negligence. But let children be beaten for such a fault.
(Chapter XLVII) No one, however, should presume to sing or read unless he is able so to perform this office that the hearers may be edified; and let it be done with humility, gravity, and reverence by him whom the Abbot hath ordered.
(Chapter LIII) When, therefore, a guest is announced, let him be met by the Superior and the brethren with every mark of charity. And let them first pray together, and then let them associate with one another in peace. This kiss of peace should not be given before a prayer hath first been said, on account of satanic deception. In the greeting let all humility be shown to the guests, whether coming or going; with the head bowed down or the whole body prostrate on the ground, let Christ be adored in them as He is also received.
(Chapter LVII) If there be skilled workmen in the monastery, let them work at their art in all humility, if the Abbot giveth his permission.
(Chapter LX) It may be granted him (a priest in the monastery), however, to stand next after the Abbot, and to give the blessing, or to celebrate Mass, but only if the Abbot ordereth him to do so; but if he doth not bid him, let him not presume to do anything under whatever consideration, knowing that he is under the discipline of the Rule, and let him rather give examples of humility to all. But if there is a question of an appointment in the monastery, or any other matter, let him be ranked by the time of his entry into the monastery, and not by the place granted him in consideration of the priesthood.
(Chapter LXI) If a monk who is a stranger, arriveth from a distant place and desireth to live in the monastery as a guest, and is satisfied with the customs he findeth there, and doth not trouble the monastery with superfluous wants, but is satisfied with what he findeth, let him be received for as long a time as he desireth. Still, if he should reasonably, with humility and charity, censure or point out anything, let the Abbot consider discreetly whether the Lord did not perhaps send him for that very purpose. If later on he desireth to declare his stability let his wish not be denied, and especially since his life could be known during his stay as a guest.
(Chapter LXV) If, however, the place require it, or the brotherhood reasonably and with humility make the request, and the Abbot shall deem it advisable, let the Abbot himself appoint as Prior whomever, with the advice of God-fearing brethren, he shall select. But let the Prior reverently do what his Abbot hath enjoined on him, doing nothing against the will or the direction of the Abbot; for the higher he is placed above others, the more careful should he be to obey the precepts of the Rule.

Our Founder, Father Henry Peter Balthasar Lemke,OSB with some pastoral words on the Liturgy from his diary.

At 10:00 o’clock, I began the Holy Sacrifice, accompanied by the playing of the organ and singing; both of which I must say were quite good. After I had read the gospel, the elderly gentleman (Gallitzin) came hurriedly up to the altar, pushed me aside in a rather unceremonious manner and began to deliver a sermon. I was able to put together enough of his English sermon to gather that he was speaking quite firmly about the evils of pride and vanity. There was nothing in the entire world that this simple and humble man could really get more enthusiastic about than when he spoke of how vanity, pomposity and all the new styles were making efforts to undermine his dear spiritual children.

. Mueller came up to me rubbing his hands together and looking most serenely at me: “Would your reverence desire singing?” I looked at him and asked: “Without an organ and a choir?” “As you very well know,” he answered, “the people in Alsatia are very accustomed to singing Latin Mass and vespers. I have put together from those newly-arrived folk from Alsatia a wonderful choir, and my wife is also an able singer.” “Fine and dandy. Let’s proceed.” The choir had attached to the carpenter’s bench slips of paper designating the crafters of the altar, and, along with that, carpenters tables were left standing in the back of the church. As I arrived at the altar, they began with a “kyrie eleison” that could very well have done damage to a hardened stone.

Whenever there was a brief pause in the singing, I would hear another and mysterious singing coming from outside. Only when I had finished singing the gospel and was preparing to begin my sermon did it come to me what this was all about. All the people’s dogs had accompanied them to church and were gathered together in a huge pack in front of the door. These poor animals had never heard anything like this in their entire life, thus moving them to all let out a frightening howl. There I stood with the gospel book in my hand, looking at the congregation, and the congregation stood there with pious demeanor looking at me, and the dogs were howling outside. Finally I said: “Is there anyone here who might know how to chase away those dogs?” With that, the entire congregation jumped up and headed for the door, grabbed up sticks and snowballs, and chased about wildly after the dogs in the surrounding shrubbery. All I could do was wait quietly until they arrived back from their expedition, all out of breath. Then I set forth with my sermon.

“You are like a gift sent from God,” I said, as I saw him. “My organist is sitting in a jail; therefore, you will play the organ tomorrow morning. The congregation will sing the German Mass with the opening words: ‘Here one prostrates before your majesty’. I am sure that you, as a German school teacher are familiar with that Mass. Right now, just make yourself comfortable. I need to get back to the confessional; we can talk more tomorrow.”

Prayer Requests

From Bill Brady: The Rev. Richard Schuler, a onetime faculty member at the College (now University) of St. Thomas and longtime priest at St. Agnes Catholic Church in St. Paul, died Friday, April 19, at North Memorial Residential Hospice in Brooklyn Center. He was 86 and had suffered several debilitating strokes. Schuler, founder and longtime director of the Twin Cities Catholic Chorale, a sacred-music group based first at St. Thomas and later at St. Agnes, was a passionate champion of classical liturgical music and orthodox Catholic culture, relatives and colleagues said. From a BC parent in Texas: I ask for your prayers tonight for a friend, who's son, Trey, has been diagnosed with Neural Blastoma, a rare form of cancer. Trey is 3 years old and is in need of a miracle. By all appearances he seemed like a normal healthy child, but when being evaluated for a possible hernia, they found a tumor on his adrenal gland (attached to the kidney) the size of a grapefruit. It is also in his bone, bone marrow, has metastasized to his spine, with tumors within his chest cavity and along his spinal column. He will be given chemotherapy, a bone marrow transplant, and one kidney will be removed. He actually started his first round of Chemo on Holy Thursday and may start the 2nd round this Tuesday.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Saint Anselm and the use of reason
Today, Saturday, April 21, 2007, is the Feast of St. Anselm, a great doctor of the Church. This Benedictine Abbot, who would become Archbishop of Cantebury, was a rare person in his ability to integrate his life of faith as a monk, with his life of reason as one of the great philosophers/theologians of all times.

Some of St. Anselm’s greatest achievements came as a result of his tenacity to truth. While he protested his inability to lead people, both when elected as Abbot, and when chosen as Archbishop; once in office, St. Anselm trusted in the grace of Christ to help him lead his monks, and later the Catholics of England who were under his pastoral care as Archbishop.

The two stories that follow point to the need of modern man to rediscover faith and reason.

The next story after this is the response of Communion and Liberation to the violence at Virginia Tech, and the tragic challenge to reason that we have witnessed. The intervention is asking people to re-read Pope Benedict’s address at Regensburg. Of course it will also be remembered that it was at Regensburg that the founder of our Abbey, Father Henry Peter Balthasar Lemke discovered in the person of Bishop Johann Michael Sailer a man impassioned with this quest for faith and reason.

The final story below is encouraging because it is about a conference on catholic higher education being held this weekend at the University of Steubenville. Leaders of the Universities of Steubenville, Notre Dame, and Loyola, as well as leaders of Catholic higher education from all over the world will be learning about the role of the Catholic higher education as a City on a Hill.

A TRAGIC CHALLENGE TO REASON

Communion and Liberation response to violence in schools
Together with the rest of the country, we have followed with profound sadness the details of Monday's massacre at Virginia Tech. Nothing can rival the sadness brought about by human life that seems wasted. Who would not echo Pope Benedict XVI's words to the Virginia Tech community, referring to those events as a "senseless tragedy"?

It is precisely the senselessness of such a tragedy that provokes questions about our human condition, the nature of evil and the source of hope in the face of the possibility of such evil in our world and our lives. These questions cannot be avoided; they demand real, certain answers.

That Monday's tragedy—like the tragedy at Columbine—took place in a school, and specifically a university, particularly disturbs us. In precisely these places young people should find the most solid answers to such questions, the most certain paths to the truth of our human condition.

Yet there is a myopic vision of reason—much in vogue in schools and universities— which, in the words of Pope Benedict at the University of Regensburg, relegates "the specifically human questions about our origin and destiny, the questions raised by religion and ethics" to the "realm of the subjective." For the good of the young and the good of our country, it is long since time to critically evaluate this view of reason.

At Regensburg Pope Benedict spoke of the urgent need for "broadening our concept of reason and its application" in order to avoid the "disturbing pathologies of religion and reason which necessarily erupt when reason is so reduced that questions of religion and ethics no longer concern it."

To this end we strongly urge all those connected to the question of education—including parents—to review and discuss Pope Benedict XVI's address at the University of Regensburg:
http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/speeches/2006/september/documents/hf_ben-xvi_spe_20060912_university-regensburg_en.html

Communion and Liberation, USA

April 20, 2007
A City on a Hill

STEUBENVILLE, OH--What is the purpose of Catholic higher education and what distinguishes it from its secular counterpart? What is the proper relationship between the Catholic university and the Catholic Church? And what is the Catholic university’s responsibility to the culture at large?

University and college presidents, senior administrators, and faculty members from Catholic institutions are invited to gather and discuss these pressing questions at "A City on a Hill," a symposium on the purpose and identity of Catholic higher education, taking place from Thursday, April 19, to Sunday, April 22.

Hosted by Franciscan University of Steubenville, the symposium will be an opportunity for dialogue. Those involved in Catholic higher education will share their understanding of their mission, assess the potential impact of Catholic colleges and universities on today’s world, and reflect upon the tradition and future of the Catholic intellectual tradition.

“For nearly a thousand years, Catholic universities have been at the intellectual center of the Western world, producing the ideas and thinkers that shape the paths of history,” says Dr. Max Bonilla, vice president for Academic Affairs at Franciscan University. “The unique challenges and opportunities of the last century, however, changed the way many Catholic institutions understand their mission and identity. Today, there are almost as many different visions of Catholic higher education as there are Catholic colleges and universities.”

Through a series of paper presentations and panel discussions, attendees will examine the merits of these different visions and look for what, if any, common thread runs through them. The conference will also feature four keynote addresses by internationally recognized leaders in Catholic higher education:

Archbishop J. Michael Miller, CSB, secretary of the Congregation for Catholic Education at the Vatican and former president of the University of St. Thomas in Houston, Texas
the Honorable Mario Mauro, vice president of the European Parliament and former director of schools and universities for the Italian Government Father Michael J. Garanzini, SJ, president of Loyola University Chicago
Father John Jenkins, CSC, president of the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Car accident

150th Anniversary

What is Christianity?

Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR

Archbishop Naumann, RCIA Mass

Cardinal Ratzinger on CL
FOCUS

Messages from Father Brendan Rolling, OSB

(Thanks Father Brendan, and Linda for showing this sign of Mercy to our students. Having just celebrated Divine Mercy Sunday we realize how important Mercy is. Please pray for Justin and Franny. Also pray for one of the persons in the other car who died.) 11:27 PM last evening: One current (Benedictine College) student, Justin McLuckie, and one former student, Franny Lopez were in a car accident tonight. They are at North Kansas City Hospital. Linda Henry and I are driving down to be with them.

5:08 AM this morning:

Justin was still in surgery, they’re concerned that some of his vertebrate may be cracked....this in addition to his two broken legs. Franny, has a couple broken bones in her left leg and her pelvis may also have damage. Both she and Justin were wearing their seat belts.

Beginning of our 150th anniversary

Everyone is invited to join the monks for Mass on Sunday, April 29th, 2007 at 2:00 PM in the Abbey Church as we begin our celebration of the 150th anniversary of being founded as a Monastery (1857) We would later be raised to the status of “Abbey” on April 7, 1876 by Pope Blessed Pius IX.

Archbishop Joseph Naumann will celebrate the Mass, preach, and dedicate the renovation project of the Abbey Church, following the handicap access improvements. Priests who wish to concelebrate with Archbishop Naumann, Abbot Barnabas, and the monks are invited to do so. Arrive early and meet in the Guadalupe Chapel of the Abbey Church crypt.

Following the Mass, Benedictine College is going to have a ceremony changing the name of the Administration Building to St. Benedict Hall.

What is Christianity?

In Christianity truth is not a philosophical concept nor is it a theory, a teaching, or a system, but rather, it is the living theanthropic hypostasis - the historical Jesus Christ (John 14:6).
-St. Justin Popovich

Fr Giussani always kept the eyes of his life and of his heart fixed on Christ. In this way, he understood that Christianity is not an intellectual system, a packet of dogmas, a moralism, Christianity is rather an encounter, a love story; it is an event.
-Pope Benedict XVI

Christian spirituality is not philosophy, scriptural exegesis, theology or liturgy, although all of these may serve to help us relate to the transcendent God. Christian spirituality is a personal; relationship with the living Christ, and, through Him, with the Father and the Holy Spirit.
-Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR

Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR

I just spoke with Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, this morning about his upcoming trip to Kansas this Fall. He will be speaking on the topic of The Springtime of Faith on Monday, October 29, at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAlister Auditorium at Benedictine College in Atchison, Ks. He will also be meeting in the afternoon to speak with students considering a vocation to Priesthood and/or Consecrated Life.

Father Benedict has a doctorate in Freudian psychoanalysis from Columbia University. He has taught at the seminary for the Archdiocese of New York, served as Director of the Office of Spiritual Renewal for the Archdiocese, and was a founding member of the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal who actively work with the poorest of the poor, both materially and spiritually, throughout the world. For many years he and Blessed Mother Teresa were close friends and shared a love for the Pope and for the poor.

Archbishop Naumann, RCIA Mass

Last evening Archbishop Joseph Naumann was here for the RCIA Mass at the college. 8 students were baptized, and 2 others joined them for Confirmation, making a grand total of 10 for Confirmation and First Holy Eucharist.

Justin West did a great job of preparing these young people for the Sacraments.

Cardinal Ratzinger commenting on CL:

We met don Giussani and his people at the universities at the time of the Marxist revolution; theirs was not a reactionary or a conservative response, but a fresher and more radical revolution: the Christian faith.

FOCUS National Conference

The Fellowship of Catholic University Students announces a 10th anniversary conference to be held at January 2-6, 2008 at the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center at Grapevine, Tx. The theme of this event is Go, and set the world on Fire. For more information go to the FOCUS website at: http://www.focusonline.org/

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Divine Mercy Sunday

On April 7, 2001, Archbishop James Keleher attended Mass with the monks in the Abbey Church as we commemorated the 125th anniversary of our being named an Abbey. (We were founded in 1857 as a Priory, and raised to the status of “Abbey” 19 years later by Blessed Pope Pius IX on April 7, 1876)

To commemorate that day, Archbishop Keleher gave us two framed pictures of Divine Mercy. We will enthrone one in the Abbey Church, and the other in the college Chapel. Archbishop Keleher knew that the greatest gift he could present to the monks is the Mercy that only Christ can give through His sorrowful Passion, by which we ask Him to have Mercy on us, and on the whole world.

From the Diary of Saint Faustina:

Whoever approaches the Fountain of Life on this day will be granted complete forgiveness of sins and punishment. (Diary 300)

I want the image solemnly blessed on the first Sunday after Easter, and I want it to be venerated publicly so that every soul may know about it. (Diary 341)

Authentic knowledge of the God of mercy, the God of tender love, is a constant and inexhaustible source of conversion, not only as a momentary interior act but also as a permanent attitude, as a state of mind. Those who come to know God in this way, who "see" Him in this way, can live only in a state of being continually converted to Him.
-Pope John Paul II, Rich in Mercy, #13

Happy 80th Birthday Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVI turns 80 on Monday, and on Thursday celebrates his second anniversary of being Pope. EWTN had a tribute to the Holy Father today, including an interview with the Benedictine Abbot Primate Notker Wolf, OSB, who spoke in glowing terms of the Holy Father’s intellectual ability and desire to evangelize.

The following is a dialogue with the Abbot Primate in the National Catholic Register:
I think he has a great mission, says Benedictine Father Notker Wolf, abbot primate of the Benedictine Order. We have seen it now; he puts his fingers on very important matters.
Abbot Wolf says that Benedict’s pastoral approach is decidedly Benedictine. It’s about the basics, holy scripture and our good, solid tradition, he said.

Capuchins elect new Provincial

(When the Prior of our Monastery, Prior Louis Fink, OSB, became Bishop of all Kansas in the 1870s, he invited the Capuchins from Pennsylvania to come help minister to the Volga German settlers of northwest Kansas.)
Capuchin Franciscan friars of the Mid-America Province elected Fr. Charles Polifka, O.F.M., Cap. to a three-year term as their provincial minister during their 10th ordinary chapter at Victoria, Kan., April 9-13.

Forty-five friars from Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, and Pennsylvania, as well as from Italy and Mexico participated in the elections. Eight other Capuchins were present as observers and participated in various other business conducted as part of the province's planning for the future.

Fr. Polifka, pastor of St. Fidelis Church in Victoria since 2004, served previously as acting provincial minister for the last year of Fr. Charles Chaput's second term as provincial minister, upon the latter's appointment in 1988 as Bishop of Rapid City, S.Dak., and two terms as provincial minister from 1989 till 1995. He replaces Fr. Michael Scully, who has held the office since 2001.

Ordained a priest in 1971, Fr. Polifka has also served as a faculty member of Thomas More Prep-Marian in Hays, Kan., 1972-80; president of the same 1980-83; novice director in Victoria, 1984-88; and pastor of St. John's Church in Lawrence, Kan., 1995-2004. At the time of his election, Fr. Polifka was also superior of St. Fidelis Friary, pastor of mission churches in Walker and Vincent, administrator of Holy Cross Shrine in Pfeifer, and director of the Capuchin Center for Spiritual Life.

The friars also elected Fr. Jim Moster, VA hospital chaplain in Topeka, to assist Polifka as his vicar and first counselor. Other members of the council elected to advise Fr. Polifka are Fr. Christopher Popravak, co-director of novices in Allison Park, Penn; Fr. Frank Grinko, postulancy director in St. Louis; and Fr. John Schmeidler, pastor of St. John the Evangelist Church in Lawrence, Kan.

The Mid-America Capuchins are active mostly in Colorado, Kansas, and Missouri and have missionaries in Papua New Guinea, Puerto Rico and Mexico. Their headquarters are in Denver, and their web site at www.midamcaps.org

Br. Mark Schenk, a member of the province elected in 2006 to serve on the order's general council in Rome, presided at the 2007 Mid-America chapter as representative of the worldwide general minister in Rome.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Knightly News

The Benedictine College Knights of Columbus has elected officers for the coming academic year, and award winners for the current one.
2007-2008 Officers
Grand Knight: Paul Clark
Deputy Grand Knight: Andrew Jaeger
Chancellor: Vincent Henningsgaard
Recorder: Tylan Ricketts
Treasurer: Eric Klinckman
Warden: Zac Pinnaire
Financial Secretary: Keith Jaloma
Chaplain: Fr. Meinrad Miller, OSB

2006-2007 Award winners
(Co) Knight of the Year: Zac Lancaster, and Dan Misener
Rookie Knight of the Year: Matt Eschnaur
Knights of Columbus Family of the Year:
Jeff and Sarah Schinstock, and children: Regina, Thomas, Elizabeth.

Pope Benedict XVI. Part of his message to
Communion and Liberation, March 24, 2007
St. Peter’s Square, Vatican City

Through him the Holy Spirit aroused in the Church a movement -- yours -- that would witness the beauty of being Christians in an epoch in which the opinion was spreading that Christianity was something tiresome and oppressive to live. Father Giussani, then, set himself to reawaken in the youth the love for Christ, the way, the truth and the life, repeating that only he is the road toward the realization of the deepest desires of man's heart; and that Christ saves us not despite our humanity, but through it.

Upcoming Events

I) Sunday, April 29th, 2007, 2:00 PM: Abbey Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the 150th anniversary year of the Abbey with a Mass of Dedication celebrated by Archbishop Joseph Naumann. Following the Mass, Benedictine College is going to have a ceremony changing the name of the Administration Building to St. Benedict’s Hall

II) FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholuc University Students) training on the campus of Benedictine College from late May through early July. The FOCUS missionaries from around the United States will be here on our campus for their annual training.

III) General Chapter of the American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monasteries will be here in June. Abbots and Priors from Benedictine Abbeys and Priories, as well as one delegate from each house will be here this includes:

St. Vincent Archabbey, Pa
St. John’s Abbey, Mn
St. Benedict’s Abbey, Ks
St. Mary’s Abbey, NJ
Belmont Abbey, NC
St. Bernard Abbey, Al
St. Procopius Abbey, Il
St. Gregory’s Abbey, Ok
St. Leo Abbey, Fl
Assumption Abbey, ND
St. Bede Abbey, Il
St. Peter’s Abbey, Canada
St. Martin’s Abbey, Wa
St. Anselm Abbey, NH
St. Andrew Abbey, Oh
Mount Savior Priory, NY
Newark Abbey, NJ
Tepeyac Abbey, Mexico
San Antonio Abad, Puerto Rico
Mary Mother of the Church Abbey, Va.

IV) The meeting of the leaders of Benedictine Universities from around the United States will be here in June.

V) Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day at the Abbey. Welcoming the Monks from our Priory in Mineiros, Brazil.

VI) Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes,
Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding
monastery, will be principal celebrant of the 2:00 PM Mass.

VII) Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities for the Abbey’s 150th anniversary.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Blessed Easter to you all!

When a monk professess Solemn Vows, he is covered in a funeral pall as he lies prostrate on the floor in front of the altar during the chanting of the Litany of the Saints. This reminds the monk that like the saints, he should desire to live in the Risen Christ, and to recognize the Risen Christ at every moment and in every person.

The following passages speak about this life in Christ

The first group of quotes are passages throughout the Rule of Saint Benedict Where the word “Christ” is used. Clearly, by this Saint Benedict had in mind our Resurrected, Glorious Savior whose life giving Passion, Death, and Resurrection we have just celebrated this Easter Triduum. The final quote is a short quote from a talk Monsignor Luigi Giussani gave to the Benedictine monks of Milan. Monsignor Giussani always maintained a connection with St. Benedict, the Patron Saint of Europe.

Rule of Saint Benedict

The 1949 Edition
Translated by Rev. Boniface Verheyen, OSB
of St. Benedict's Abbey, Atchison, Kansas
Prologue

To thee, therefore, my speech is now directed, who, giving up thine own will, takest up the strong and most excellent arms of obedience, to do battle for Christ the Lord, the true King.

hath taken his evil thoughts whilst they were yet weak and hath dashed them against Christ

we may by patience share in the sufferings of Christ, and be found worthy to be coheirs with Him of His kingdom.

Chapter II, The Abbot

For he (The Abbot) is believed to hold the place of Christ in the monastery, when he is called by his name, according to the saying of the Apostle: "You have received the spirit of adoption of sons, whereby we cry Abba (Father)" (Rom 8:15).
for whether bound or free, we are all one in Christ (cf Gal 3:28; Eph 6:8),

Chapter IV, Instruments of Good Works:

To deny one's self in order to follow Christ (cf Mt 16:24; Lk 9:23).
To prefer nothing to the love of Christ.
To dash at once against Christ the evil thoughts which rise in one's heart.
To pray for one's enemies in the love of Christ.

Chapter V, Obedience

This becometh those who, on account of the holy subjection which they have promised, or of the fear of hell, or the glory of life everlasting, hold nothing dearer than Christ.

Chapter VII, Humility

In virtue of this love all things which at first he observed not without fear, he will now begin to keep without any effort, and as it were, naturally by force of habit, no longer from the fear of hell, but from the love of Christ, from the very habit of good and the pleasure in virtue.

Chapter XXXVI, Concern for the Sick

Care must be taken of the sick, that they be served in very truth as Christ is served; because He hath said, "I was sick and you visited Me"

Chapter LIII Of the Reception of Guests

Let all guests who arrive be received as Christ, because He will say: "I was a stranger and you took Me in" (Mt 25:35).
In the greeting let all humility be shown to the guests, whether coming or going; with the head bowed down or the whole body prostrate on the ground, let Christ be adored in them as He is also received.
Let the greatest care be taken, especially in the reception of the poor and travelers, because Christ is received more specially in them; whereas regard for the wealthy itself procureth them respect.

Chapter LXIV, The Election on an Abbot.

The Abbot is believed to hold the place of Christ, let him be styled Lord and Abbot, not only by assumption on his part, but out of love and reverence for Christ.

Chapter LXXII, Of the Virtuous Zeal of Monks


Let them fear God and love their Abbot with sincere and humble affection; let them prefer nothing whatever to Christ, and my He lead us all together to life everlasting.
Chapter LXXIII, Of This, that Not the Whole Observance of Righteousness Is Laid Down in this Rule

Thou, therefore, who hastenest to the heavenly home, with the help of Christ fulfil this least rule written for a beginning; and then thou shalt with God's help attain at last to the greater heights of knowledge and virtue which we have mentioned above.

Monsignor Giussani to the
Benedictine Monks of Cascianazza, Milan

February 12, 1982, the same month that the
Fraternity of CL received papal recognition.
In short, you have to keep constantly before you the reason you are here together with the others, and the reason is the presence of Christ, so that you may bear witness, with your unity, to the world. If this is strong, then the problems that come from your living together can find a solution; it becomes easier to overcome indifference and lack of understanding. In short, would a mother, toward her child, act as we so many times act among ourselves? No! She would try to understand him.

But then, is the flesh worth more than the spirit? We must have forgiveness for those who are different. I say it all the time: forgiveness is embracing what is different. However, for this to happen, much more than making the resolution to forgive, understand, and let things go, much more than directly resolving, it is better to resolve to be conscious of why we are together, of the reason “why.” If this consciousness of the reason why I must understand, not remain indifferent, and forgive, grows, then it becomes easier also to forgive, to understand, etc.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



First, a very Happy Easter to all of you. Let us together recognize that Christ is in our midst!!!

Unchanging Heart of the Priesthood

In these days of Holy Week, I have been reading a book on the priesthood by Father Thomas Acklin, O.S.B., Ph.D, S.T.D., a Benedictine monk of St. Vincent Archabbey (the house that founded us 150 years ago.) The title of the book is The Unchanging Heart of the Priesthood. You can order it from Emmaus Road Publishing:
http://www.emmausroad.org/The-Unchanging-Heart-of-the-Priesthood-P3396C483.aspx

or fine Catholic bookstores everywhere. (While at the Emmaus Road site, take a look at the great collection of books to help you grow in the spiritual life.)

This book by Father Thomas reminded me of two aspects of our Holy Father Saint Benedict’s teaching:
In speaking about murmuring, St. Benedict says that the Abbot should arrange work so that the monk does not murmur. Often we are thrown into ministry within hostile environments, and expected to “float.” Father Thomas helps the priest do much more than just survive on his own, He shows the need to be fully human, and fully alive to the working of the Holy Spirit in every aspect of life. St. Benedict says that, in addition to every page and passage of the Old and New Testament and the lives of the Saints, and their Rules (St. Basil, John Cassian) that the Holy Catholic fathers resoundingly summon us along the road to reach everlasting life. Father Thomas introduces the us to the authentic tradition of the Church.

An example of Father Thomas’ writing in this book:
What is needed in the Church today is a priesthood of servant hearts, unafraid of power, yet not intoxicated by it – servant hearts authorized in their priesthood by the servant heart of Jesus Christ. Like Jesus, ordained priests must be meek and humble of heart; they must not be afraid to be consumed in self-gift through the self-gift of Jesus Christ, who has called them to follow Him more closely. As we seek to look more penetratingly into the unchanging heart of the priesthood, let us examine how our human heart has been created in the image and likeness of God’s divine heart and reflect upon human love in the divine plan.

This understanding of the Heart is close to Monsignor Giussani, as well as our Holy Father Saint Benedict. St. Benedict will write in the Prologue to his Rule for Monasteries, his understanding of the role of the heart in the spiritual life.

...Incline the ear of thy heart, and cheerfully receive and faithfully execute the admonitions of thy loving Father,
"Today, if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts"
"He that walketh without blemish and worketh justice; he that speaketh truth in his heart; who hath not used deceit in his tongue, nor hath done evil to his neighbor, nor hath taken up a reproach against his neighbor"
casting him (The demon) out of his heart with his temptation, and hath taken his evil thoughts whilst they were yet weak and hath dashed them against Christ. Prologue, quoting the Psalms.
Our hearts and our bodies must, therefore, be ready to do battle under the biddings of holy obedience we shall run the way of God's commandments with expanded hearts and unspeakable sweetness of love;

What others are saying about this book
In response to recent and ongoing attacks on the institution of the priesthood, Fr. Thomas Acklin, OSB provides meaningful evidence of the true dignity of the Catholic priesthood in The Unchanging Heart of the Priesthood. . . . This book addresses many of the misunderstandings concerning the priesthood, and highlights a proper understanding of celibacy. I am grateful to Fr. Acklin for this gift he has provided to the Church. -Father Frank Pavone, Priests for Life

Then last year we published The Unchanging Heart of the Priesthood by Fr. Thomas Acklin, O.S.B. This book lays out the timeless beauty, dignity, and excellence of the ordained priesthood at a time when the very institution is under severe attack. Over 40 bishops from around the world have written to thank us for publishing this significant title, which in one year has already gone through three printings. -Leon J. Suprenant, Jr.
President, Catholics United For the Faith

Here he gives us a solid, thoroughly thoughtful and psychological analysis of the present difficulties and brings this to a logical conclusion based on well-thought-out arguments...Father Thomas analyzes the evangelical, theological, and historical foundations of the priesthood...Father Thomas has the background, professional training, and certification in psychoanalysis that very few priests have.
-Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR (Who will be Speaking at Benedictine College, October 29, 2007, 7:30 PM, O’Malley-McAlister Auditorium.)

The Unchanging heart of the Priesthood is a welcome addition to today’s discussions on the priesthood and a valuable contribution to the effort to support and sustain the Church’s vision of priesthood as it is experienced and lived by so many good priests, religious, and secular, throughout this country.
Archbishop Donald Wuerl, Archbsihop of Washington, D.C.

Father Acklin’s approach is uniquely his, given his experience as a spiritual director, psychoanalyst, and seminary rector. His insights, however, will be inestimably valuable to all who love Christ’s priests.
-Scott Hahn
Professor, Franciscan University of Steubenville
Saint Vincent Seminary, Latrobe, Pa.

A positive, upbeat evaluation of current trends among seminarians and young priests. It is especially encouraging to discover that they... Are seriously interested in prayer, self-denial. And the proven forms of asceticism that lead to personal holiness.
Fr. Kenneth Baker, S.J.
Editor, Homiletics and Pastoral Review

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Communion and Liberation Way of the Cross
Pope’s audience address in English on the Triduum
Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, to speak here at BC
Father Henry Peter Balthasar Lemke, OSB, Founder of our Abbey
Holy Week with the Monks

CL Way of the Cross
7:00 PM Good Friday, Atchison, Ks beginning at St. Benedict’s Parish (1001 N. Second St) and moving to St. Benedict’s Abbey Church. This lovely Way of the Cross (booklets will be provided) will last about 1 1/2 hours. This Way of the Cross will be celebrated all over the United States, and the world.

His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI sends greetings and the assurance of his spiritual closeness to all taking part in the Good Friday Stations of the Cross organized by Communion and Liberation in the City of New York and other cities throughout the United States. He prays that those who gather for this annual pilgrimage in the footsteps of the Redeemer will be led to sincere conversion of heart, deeper union with the crucified Lord in the mystery of the redemptive suffering and renewed commitment to the Gospel imperative of reconciliation, solidarity, and peace. Commending all present to the intercession of Our Lady of Sorrows, the Holy Father cordially imparts his Apostolic Blessing as a pledge of the abundant joy of Easter.

-Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone
Secretary of State

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wednesday's Audience
------------------------------------------------------------------------

[After the audience, the Pope greeted the people in several languages. In English, he said:]
Dear Brothers and Sisters,

As we approach the end of Lent and the commemoration of Christ's passion, death and resurrection, the Church's liturgy invites us to contemplate the mystery of the Cross, to acknowledge our sinfulness and, in faith, to unite ourselves with Jesus in his saving passover from death to life. Holy Thursday, with its celebration of the Chrism Mass and the Mass of the Lord's Supper, evokes gratitude for Christ's institution of the sacraments of the Eucharist and Holy Orders, and for his new commandment of love. Good Friday is centered on the Gospel of the Lord's Passion and the adoration of his Holy Cross, the source of our salvation. The somber silence of Holy Saturday is a prelude to the joy of the Easter Vigil, with its proclamation of Christ's victory over sin and death, the gift of his grace in the sacrament of Baptism and the renewal of our baptismal promises. These liturgical celebrations are not mere commemorations of past events; they introduce us to the ever-present reality of God's saving power. Today too, Christ's love triumphs over evil, sin and death. Truly, as Saint Paul says, "if we have died with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him" (Rom 6:8).
Good Easter to all of you!
© Copyright 2007 -- Libreria Editrice Vaticana
ZE07040401

Father Benedict Groeschel, CFR, to speak at Benedictine College
October 29, 2007, 7:30 PM, O’Malley-McAlister Auditorium

I received a letter from Father Benedict saying that he is accepting our invitation to return to campus on October 29, 2007 to speak.
On the Solemnity of the Annunciation, March 25, 1996, Fr. Benedict Groeschel, CFR, spoke at Benedictine College for the first time. He celebrated Mass, and later spoke at St. Benedict’s Parish Church. In May, 2002 he returned and spoke in the Westerman Auditorium one evening, and the O-Malley-McAlister Auditorium the next. (During his first visit the auditorium was not built yet.)

In his letter, Father Benedict said:
I mentioned it (Benedictine College) on one of my broadcasts about good Catholic education. I will be delighted to have a visit so I can mention it more.
He ended the letter by saying:

I am very proud of the Benedictines of Atchison for leading the way with the college toward the restoration of Catholic education.

Our Founder recalling his first Easter
as a Lutheran Pastor, before his conversion
I was expected to put this license into use immediately, and this did come about when the pastor at my old home town invited me to come and make my rehearsal sermon at his church’s pulpit. I set about at once putting together a sermon filled with profound phrases and soaring clichés, and thus celebrated my role as a Lutheran preacher on Easter Sunday, in the year 1820.
-Father Henry Peter Balthasar Lemke, OSB, from his Diary

Holy Week with the Monks

April 5-8, 2007
Holy Thursday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
7:30 PM Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
3:00 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion
7:00 PM Communion and Liberation Way of the Cross. Begins at
St. Benedict’s Parish Church, and ends at the Abbey Church.

Holy Saturday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Evening Prayer
8:30 PM Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday
7:00 AM Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

Father most holy,
look upon the blood flowing from the Saviour's pierced side;
look upon the blood shed by the many victims
of hatred, of war, of terrorism,
and in your mercy, grant that the course of world events
may unfold according to your will, in justice and in peace,
and that your Church may devote herself with quiet confidence
to your service and to the liberation of mankind.
-Pope John Paul II, Good Friday, 2003

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



BC Students lead at March for Life in DC

The following note to Kathy Garrison is from a graduate of BC who attended the March for Life this year.

Hello Kathy,

I wanted to let the administration know that I was very proud of the representation of BC at the Pro-Life Rally in Washington, D.C. I attended it for the first time with my daughter who is a sophomore at Bishop Miege. There was a large group of BC students that attended Mass at St. Matthews Cathedral, which was very impressive. Then at the rally, the whole BC gang was up front next to the speaker's podium leading cheers and showing that wonderful BC spirit. They sang the BC fight songs so many times, that the Bishop Miege kids knew it by heart before the forum even started! The BC students also set a great example as the walked in the March and often said prayers with many other non-BC people. I was so proud to be a BC Raven as I watched them and joined in their cheers and songs.
-Ronda Intfen

Pope Benedict XVI on Luigi Giussani, Founder of CL
This courageous priest grew up in a family where bread was in short supply, but one filled with music. As he liked to put it, he was touched early on by a thirst for beauty, but not any beauty. He wanted beauty itself, the infinite beauty that he found in Christ.

Join the CL people and others for our Atchison Way of the Cross, this Good Friday at 7 PM beginning at St. Benedict’s Parish Church (1001 N. Second St., Atchison, Ks) and ending at the Abbey Church.

Koinonia, Nebraska, and Father Gilbert’s 100th Birthday
I was sorry to miss our Fr. Gilbert’s 100th Birthday party on Sunday because of a Mass for the Koinonia retreat at Falls City, Ne. I thought that Fr. Gilbert, being the ever practical man that he is, would understand. When I told him why I missed he said, Falls City, I helped out there every weekend for 10 years.

It’s amazing how connected the world is. Father Gilbert and Fr. Alcuin may have been our last assignment in the Lincoln Diocese in Nebraska, a connection that began when our first Prior Father Augustine Wirth, OSB would take the boat up to Omaha and minister to the tiny group of Catholics in the very early days of the late 1850s.

First Anniversary Holy Hour
Tylan Ricketts a Freshman at BC helped organize a Divine Mercy Eucharistic Holy Hour this past Monday to commemorate the second anniversary of the death of Pope John Paul the Great. It was awesome to see the students show up and pray for this Holy Father who truly lead a generation of the faithful.

Holy Week with the Monks

April 5-8, 2007
Holy Thursday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
7:30 PM Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday

6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
3:00 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion
7:00 PM Communion and Liberation Way of the Cross. Begins at St. Benedict’s Parish Church, and ends at the Abbey Church.

Holy Saturday

6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Evening Prayer
8:30 PM Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday

7:00 AM Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

Father most holy, look upon the blood flowing from the Saviour's pierced side; look upon the blood shed by the many victims of hatred, of war, of terrorism,
and in your mercy, grant that the course of world events may unfold according to your will, in justice and in peace, and that your Church may devote herself with quiet confidence to your service and to the liberation of mankind.
-Pope John Paul II, Good Friday, 2003

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Holy Week at the Abbey

Benedictine College and the Knights of Columbus

Traces

Holy Week with the Monks

April 5-8, 2007
Holy Thursday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
7:30 PM Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
3:00 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion
7:00 PM Communion and Liberation Way of the Cross. Begins at
St. Benedict’s Parish Church, and ends at the Abbey Church.

Holy Saturday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Evening Prayer
8:30 PM Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday
7:00 AM Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

Father most holy,
look upon the blood flowing from the Saviour's pierced side;
look upon the blood shed by the many victims
of hatred, of war, of terrorism,
and in your mercy, grant that the course of world events
may unfold according to your will, in justice and in peace,
and that your Church may devote herself with quiet confidence
to your service and to the liberation of mankind.
-Pope John Paul II, Good Friday, 2003

Knightly News

Tim Hickey, the editor of Columbia Magazine, the journal of the Knights of Columbus is a graduate of Benedictine College. This publication has one of the largest circulations in the Catholic world.

Not only is Tim, the editor, a BC alumn, but there is a wonderful article in the current April, 2007 edition by Dr. Mark Zia, who currently teaches in the Theology department here at Benedictine College. The title of Dr. Zia’s article is Words to Live by, Pope John Paul II’s Message to the Knights.

To “finish things off” the back cover of the current April edition features the vocation story of Fr. Jerrett Konrade, another graduate of Benedictine College.

Another Great Publication

Along with Columbia magazine, my favorite publication is Traces, the official publication of Communion and Liberation. I highly recommend it for yourself, and as a gift to friends. You can order it at the following site:
http://www.clonline.us/traces/online_orders.cfm

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

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by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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2007 Communion and Liberation

http://www.clonline.us/

Way of the Cross
Atchison, Kansas
Good Friday, April 6, 2007 7:00 PM

Meet at St. Benedict’s Parish Church, 1001 N. Second St.
Atchison, Kansas, 7:00 PM on Good Friday

One cannot recognize Christ on the cross without immediately understanding and sensing that that cross must touch us. Msgr. Luigi Giussani

Faith is Given to Us So That We May Communicate It.
Monsignor Luigi Giussani

Message of Pope Benedict XVI:
The Holy Father is pleased to have been informed of the Good Friday Stations of the Cross taking place once more in New York. He sends cordial greetings to the members of Communion and Liberation, organizing this and similar events across the nation, and assures all those taking part of his union in prayer. Christ’s death on the Cross is love in its most radical form. Indeed it is by ‘contemplating the pierced side of Christ’ that we ‘discover the path along which our life and love must move’ (Deus Caritas Est, 12). His Holiness is confident that this powerful act of witness will encourage Christians to strengthen their commitment to bring the splendour of Christ’s liberating truth to the public forum, shining as a beacon of justice, peace and hope for all. As a pledge of Easter joy the Holy Father cordially imparts the requested Apostolic Blessing.
Cardinal Angelo Sodano Secretary of State. 2006

U.S. Cities and Towns in 2007 that will have a CL Way of the Cross

Atchison, Ks
Atlanta, GA
Boston, MA
Charleston, SC
Chicago, IL
Cumberland, MD
Dayton, OH
Duluth, MN
Evansville, IN
Fall River, MA
Houston, TX
Huron, SD
Jasper, IN
Los Angeles, CA
New York, NY
Norman, OK
Philadelphia, PA
Plano & Dallas, TX
Rensselaer, IN
Rochester, MN
Sacramento, CA
St. Cloud, MN
St. Louis, MO
Salem, OR
San Diego, CA
San Francisco, CA
South Bend, IN
Steubenville, OH
Tampa, FL
Toledo, OH
Washington, DC

Communion and Liberation is an international Catholic movement founded by Monsignor Luigi Giussani in 1954. It is actively present in 75 countries and in many US dioceses. CL is an ecclesiastical movement that is open to everyone and witnessing to the living presence of Jesus Christ in the Church. It holds weekly meeting of catechesis, cultural and educational events, and moments of community life. All are invited to “come and see”.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



This Week

Friday-Sunday, BCK 6, Koinonia Retreat for Benedictine College, Fall City Nebraska
Sunday, Fr. Gilbert’s 100th Birthday Party, Visitors can come to Abbey Guesthouse, 2-4 PM on Sunday.
Handel’s Messiah, Choirs from Benedictine College and the University of St. Mary, Leavenworth, Sunday 3 PM, Abbey Church
Abbey Holy week retreat for college students.
CL Way of the Cross, Good Friday, 7 PM. (Details to follow)

April 21: Archdiocesan Pro-Life Mass and procession to abortion clinic, Mass is at 8:00 am at Sts. Cyril & Methodius, 44 N. Mill, Kansas City, Ks. Sunday, April 29th, 2007, 2:00 PM: Abbey Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the 150th anniversary year of the Abbey with a Mass of Dedication celebrated by Archbishop Joseph Naumann. Following the Mass, Benedictine College is going to have a ceremony changing the name of the Administration Building to St. Benedict’s Hall

Prophetic words:

We must fight for beauty because without beauty we can’t live. This fight must invest every particular, otherwise how will we be able- one day- to fill St. Peter’s Square.
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, 1964

In Communion. By Amy Wellborn
http://amywelborn.typepad.com/openbook/2007/03/in_communion.html

Today, (Saturday, March 24, 2007) Pope Benedict met with members of Communion and Liberation in St. Peter's Square, on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of papal recognition of the group.

Reports say there were 130,000 present - the Italian text of the Pope's words are here. The Yahoo photo news feed is giving me blanks where there should be photos, but hopefully that will be fixed soon. Many at L'Osservatore Romano - thumbnails and watermarked larger shots.

A summary, translated at PRF from early Italian press reports:

"Go forth into the world and bring the message of truth, beauty and peace which are found in Christ the Redeemer." John Paul II's successor repeated the late Pope's words today at his first meeting with a large assembly of the Communione e Liberazione movement.

A record 130,000 persons - almost twice the anticipated number - showed up in St. Peter's Square today, in driving rain, for the assembly which marked the 25th anniversary of Pontifical recognition for CL, the ecclesiastical movement founded by Don Luigi Giussani. Besides Italian 'ciellini' [the Italian term for CL members, formed from its initials 'ci' and 'el', which together in Italian, form 'ciel', the root for the word heaven], members from 52 other countries were represented.

Although it was Pope Benedict's first formal meeting with CL, the ties that bind him to the movement go back to his friendship with Don Giussani himself. The audience with the Pope was preceded at 11 a.m. by the recital of Lauds, a projection on the maxi-screens of some of Don Diussani's speeches, and songs by C&L choirs and the assembly.

The Pope arrived at noon, when the weather had cleared enough for him to make his way through the assembly in the Popemobile.

The Pope, in his address, paid tribute to and expressed gratitude for the work of CL, a movement born in 1970 to give witness to the world about "the beauty of being Christian, in an era when the prevailing view is that Christianity is something tedious and too oppressive as a way of life." Inevitably, the Pope turned his thoughts to Don Giussani and his search for beauty "which he found in Christ."

Therefore, the Pope said, "he committed himself to awakening among the youth a love for Christ - the Way, the Truth and the Life - reminding them that He alone is the way towards realizing the desires in man's heart, and that Christ does not save us by ignoring our humanity but through it." The Pope said CL, in carrying out Giussani's teaching, has become "a community experience of faith" that is present in the Church "not by hierarchical decree and organization" but by "renewed encounter with the faith" motivated by the faithful themselves.

Today, the Pope said, "CL offers a possibility for living the Christian faith profoundly and concretely - on the one hand, with total loyalty and communion with the Successor of Peter and the bishops who assure the governance of the Church; and on the other, with the spontaneity and freedom that allow new and prophetic realizations of apostolic and missionary work."

All this, while considering the Church as central, because, the Pope said, "if the movements are truly a gift of the Holy Spirit, then they should position themselves within the ecclesiastical community and serve the Church in such a way that, through patient dialog with its Pastors, they can truly constitute edifying elements for the Church today and in the future."

At this point, Benedict XVI repeated John Paul II's admonition to CL to 'go forth into the world'.
"Continue along the path you have taken, " he said, "with a profound faith that is personalized and firmly rooted in the living Body of Christ, the Church, which guarantees the presence of Jesus among us."

Amy Wellborn’s comments: I will say this after watching snippets of the replay on EWTN - CL wins the prize for "Best Music of a New Movement." Some lovely pieces. I was struck by one - perhaps someone can identify it, that I heard (under the normal level of noise chaos in the living room) identified as a medieval piece emanating from Assisi - lots of folks in the crowd were joining in. Is it some sort of anthem for CL?

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Fr. Gilbert turns 100

Discovery Day at BC

Handel’s Messiah in Abbey Church

Koinonia Retreat

Benedictine Commencement speakers

Archdiocese pro-life rally

CL Way of the Cross at BC on Good Friday

Look who’s turning 100

Next Monday, April 2, our Father Gilbert Wolter, O.S.B. Ph.D. Turns 100. He still attends community events and goes swimming several times a week.

Fr. Gilbert is the son of the late Theodore and Nellie Vandeloo Wolters. After graduating from St. Benedict’s High School in 1926, and St. Benedict’s College in 1931, he attending the St. Benedict’s Abbey School of Theology finishing there in 1935. He made his first profession of monastic vows on July 2, 1929, and was ordained a priest on May 26, 1934.

Fr. Gilbert received a doctorate in sociology from the Catholic University of America in 1938. He also did studies in sociology at Harvard and St. Xavier’s, Antogonish, N.S. His studies at Catholic University prepared him as a marriage counselor. Later he would spend 9 summers doing this for the Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit.

At St. Benedict’s College, Fr. Gilbert served

As Chairman of the sociology department from 1938-1972
As Dean of the College from 1945-1951 (the post war years)
From 1944-45 as Athletic Director of the college
He had also served as a resident hall director
He served until 1977 as a professor at Benedictine College.
After retiring from the college, Fr. Gilbert served in parishes in Bendena, St. Patrick’s, and Wathena.

There will be a party for Fr. Gilbert celebrating his 100th Birthday this Sunday from 2-4 PM. Come to the Abbey Guesthouse entrance.

BC Discovery Day
Discovery Day Is March 28
The 12th Annual Discovery Day is coming up on Wednesday, March 28. The day of presentations and demonstrations of student/faculty collaboration on extra-curricular research projects will feature a keynote address from Dr. Charles Don Geilker, professor emeritus in physics at William Jewell College. His presentation will be "Discovery of the Maya and What the Maya Discovered." Get ready for a very interesting and informative day.

Great Concert this Sunday in Abbey Church
Concert Chorales of Benedictine College and the University of Saint Mary present Handel's Messiah
The combined Concert Chorales of Benedictine College and the University of Saint Mary (Leavenworth) will present the Easter portion of Handel's Messiah on campus this weekend. On Sunday, April 1, they will perform at 3 p.m. in the Abbey Church on the campus of Benedictine College. The Messiah is one of the most popular and finest large works from the choral repertoire. The performances will feature student soloists from both schools. Dr. William Krusemark, Professor and Chair of the Department of Fine Arts at the University of St. Mary, will conduct. Dr. Ruth Krusemark, Professor and Chair of the Department of Music at Benedictine College, will accompany the group on the organ. The event is free and open to the public.

BCK6

This weekend will be the sixth Koinonia retreat for Benedictine College. It will be at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Fall City, Ne. Please pray for the team and the students from BC going on the retreat that they might encounter Christ.

Lou Holtz to give Benedictine College Commencement Address
Former Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz will be the commencement speaker at Benedictine College this year on Saturday, May 12. The Baccalaureate Mass will be celebrated by Archbishop Joseph Naumann on Friday evening, May 11.

President Bush to give Commencement Address
At First Benedictine school in America.
Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D., and President Jim Towey of St. Vincent College in Latrobe, PA. reported that they had received notification from the White House that President George W. Bush has accepted the College's invitation and will give the Commencement address to Saint Vincent College graduates and their families on Friday, May 11. Further details are available on the College's website at http://www.stvincent.edu/home

(Interesting note, the former President of St. Vincent in Fr. John Murtha, OSB a first cousin of Congressman Murtha a war opponent. )

Archdiocesan Pro-Life Mass with Procession to abortion clinic

April 21 at 8:00 a.m.
The Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas hosts a monthly pro-life Mass, which is celebrated on the third Saturday of each month. Mass is at 8:00 am at Sts. Cyril & Methodius, 44 N. Mill, Kansas City, Ks. Immediately after Mass is a rosary procession to the abortion clinic approximately 4 blocks away. Eucharistic adoration is available for those not processing. Benediction concludes services by 10:00 am. Please join in this prayerful, peaceful witness to life.

CL Good Friday Way of the Cross at BC

AT 7 PM on Good Friday, Communion and Liberation will have a Way of the Cross on the campus here. I heard from Dr. Stephen Lewis from the Franciscan University at Steubenville. The CL people there are doing their Way of the Cross with the Bishop at Noon. We wanted to do ours later so that people can attend. Let me know if you are interested in attending and helping! mmiller@benedictine.edu

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Knights of Columbus

Pope Benedict XVI words to CL

Upcoming events

Knights of Columbus Banquet
Last evening the Benedictine College Knights of Columbus, and their dates, had a banquet at the Atchison Catholic Elementary School gym. Thanks to Fr. Gerard, and the school for letting us use the nice facilities.

Jim Scherer and his wife were present representing the state deputy. Jim is the Church Activities and vocations coordinator for the Kansas state Knights of Columbus.
Dan Misener’s parents, Ron and Kristy, and family from Elk City, Ok. cooked the wonderful dinner.
Ron Misener was the main speaker. He has served as President of the United States Custom Harvesters, Inc. His experiences in Vietnam, converting to Catholicism under the Abbot of Blue Cloud Abbey in South Dakota, and being a family and business man were all very inspiring. I reminded the Knights that next year (2008) will be the 50th anniversary of the Knights of Columbus Council on the campus. Should be a great celebration.

Benedict XVI's Address to Communion and Liberation
"Movements Are Really Gifts of the Holy Spirit"
VATICAN CITY, MARCH 25, 2007 (Zenit.org ).- Here is a translation of the address Benedict XVI gave to the lay movement Communion and Liberation on Saturday in St. Peter's Square. The ecclesial entity was celebrating the 25th anniversary of its pontifical recognition.

* * * Dear brothers and sisters,

It is a really a great pleasure for me to welcome you here today, in this St Peter's Square on the occasion of the 25 anniversary of the pontifical recognition of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation. Perhaps we expected the sun, but even water is a sign of grace and the gift of the Holy Spirit. I address my cordial greetings to each one of you, particularly to the prelates, the priests and the directors here present.
In particular I greet Father Julián Carrón, president of your fraternity, and I thank him for the fine and profound words addressed to me in the name of you all.
My first thought goes -- it's obvious -- to your founder Monsignor Luigi Giussani, to whom many memories tie me, since he had become a true friend to me. Our last meeting, as Father Carrón mentioned, took place in Milan Cathedral two years ago, when our beloved Pope John Paul II sent me to preside at his solemn funeral.
Through him the Holy Spirit aroused in the Church a movement -- yours -- that would witness the beauty of being Christians in an epoch in which the opinion was spreading that Christianity was something tiresome and oppressive to live. Father Giussani, then, set himself to reawaken in the youth the love for Christ, the way, the truth and the life, repeating that only he is the road toward the realization of the deepest desires of man's heart; and that Christ saves us not despite our humanity, but through it.
As I recalled in the homily at his funeral, this courageous priest, who grew up in a home poor in bread but rich in music, as he himself liked to say, right from the start was touched, or rather wounded by the desire for beauty, and not any kind of beauty, but he was searching for beauty itself, the infinite beauty that he found in Christ. How can we not recall Father Giussani's many encounters with my venerated predecessor John Paul II?
On an anniversary dear to you, the Pope pointed out that the original educative innovation lies in reproposing in a fascinating way, in tune with contemporary culture, the Christian event, perceived as the source of new values and capable of giving direction to the whole of existence. The event that changed the life of the founder wounded, so to speak, the lives of very many of his spiritual children, and gave rise to the many religious and ecclesial experiences that form the history of your vast and articulated spiritual family.
Communion and Liberation is a communitarian experience of faith, born in the Church not from a will to organize of the hierarchy, but originated from a renewed encounter with Christ and thus, we can say, from an impulse that derives ultimately from the Holy Spirit. Still today, this offers itself as an opportunity to live the Christian faith in a deep and up-to-date way, on one hand with a total fidelity and communion with the Successor of Peter and with the pastors who ensure the government of the Church, and on the other hand with a spontaneity and a freedom that permit new and prophetic apostolic and missionary realizations.
Dear friends, your movement thus inserts itself in that vast flourishing of associations and movements and new ecclesial realities providentially aroused in the Church by the Holy Spirit after the Second Vatican Council. Every gift of the Spirit finds itself in its origin and necessarily at the service of the building up of the Body of Christ, offering a witness of the immense charity of God for the life of all men. The reality of the ecclesial movements is therefore a sign of the fecundity of the Spirit of the Lord, so that the victory of the risen Christ be manifested in the world, and the missionary task entrusted to the whole Church be realized.
In the message to the World Congress of Ecclesial Movements, May 27, 1998, John Paul II repeated, that in the Church there is no contrast or contraposition between the institutional dimension and the charismatic dimension, of which the movements are a meaningful expression, because both are co-essential to the divine constitution of the People of God, and in the Church even the essential institutions are charismatic, and, in any case, the charisms, in one way or another, have to institutionalise themselves in order to have cohesion and continuity.
Both originated by the same Holy Spirit for the same Body of Christ concur together so as to make present the Mystery and the salvific work of Christ in the world. This explains the attention with which the Pope and the pastors look at the wealth of the charismatic gifts in the present day.
In this regard, during a recent meeting with the clergy and parish priests of Rome, recalling St. Paul's invitation in the first letter to the Thessalonians not to quench the charisms, I said that if the Lord gives us new gifts we ought to be grateful, even though they can be uncomfortable together. At the same time, since the Church is one, if the movements are really gifts of the Holy Spirit, they must insert themselves more into the community of the Church, thus in patient dialogue with the pastors they can constitute constructive elements for the today's Church and tomorrow's.

Dear brothers and sisters, on another occasion very meaningful for you, John Paul II entrusted you with this mandate, and I quote, "Go out into the whole world to bring the truth, the beauty and the peace that are met in the encounter with Christ the redeemer."

Father Giussani made those words the program of the whole movement, and for Communion and Liberation it was the start of a missionary period that took you to 80 countries. Today I invite you to go ahead on this road with a deep, personalized faith, solidly rooted in the living Body of Christ, the Church which guarantees Jesus' contemporaneity with us.

Let us conclude this meeting directing our thought to Our Lady, in the recitation of the Angelus. As we know Father Giussani had great devotion for her, nourished by the invocation "Veni Sancte Spiritus, Veni per Mariam," and by the recitation of Dante Alighieri's Hymn to the Virgin, that you repeated earlier this morning.

May the Holy Virgin accompany you and help you to pronounce generously your yes to the will of God in every circumstance. You can count, dear friends, on my constant recollection in prayer, while with affection I bless all of you here present and the whole of your spiritual family.

[Translation by ZENIT]
ZE07032528

Memorable Spring and Summer

A) This Wednesday, March 28, is Discovery Day at Benedictine College. It is a day for students to publicly present research they have done in science, math, business, history, theology, philosophy, music, and any other subject that they work with their professors to present.
B) AT 7 PM on Good Friday, Communion and Liberation will have a Way of the Cross on the campus here. I heard from Dr. Stephen Lewis from the Franciscan University at Steubenville. The CL people there are doing their Way of the Cross with the Bishop at Noon. We wanted to do ours later so that people can attend. Let me know if you are interested in attending and helping! mmiller@benedictine.edu
C) Sunday, April 29th, 2007, 2:00 PM: Abbey Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the 150th anniversary year of the Abbey with a Mass of Dedication celebrated by Archbishop Joseph Naumann. Following the Mass, Benedictine College is going to have a ceremony changing the name of the Administration Building to St. Benedict’s Hall
D) FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholuc University Students) training on the campus of Benedictine College from late May through early July. The FOCUS missionaries from around the United States will be here on our campus for their annual training.
E) General Chapter of the American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monasteries will be here in June. Abbots and Priors from Benedictine Abbeys and Priories, as well as one delegate from each house will be here this includes:

St. Vincent Archabbey, Pa
St. John’s Abbey, Mn
St. Benedict’s Abbey, Ks
St. Mary’s Abbey, NJ
Belmont Abbey, NC
St. Bernard Abbey, Al
St. Procopius Abbey, Il
St. Gregory’s Abbey, Ok
St. Leo Abbey, Fl
Assumption Abbey, ND
St. Bede Abbey, Il
St. Peter’s Abbey, Canada
St. Martin’s Abbey, Wa
St. Anselm Abbey, NH
St. Andrew Abbey, Oh
Mount Savior Priory, NY
Newark Abbey, NJ
Tepeyac Abbey, Mexico
San Antonio Abad, Puerto Rico
Mary Mother of the Church Abbey, Va.

F) The meeting of the leaders of Benedictine Universities from around the United States will be here in June.

G) Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day at the Abbey. Welcoming the Monks from our Priory in Mineiros, Brazil.

H) Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes,
Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding monastery, will be principal celebrant of the 2:00 PM Mass.

I) Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities for the Abbey’s 150th anniversary.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Papal Audience
http://www.clonline.org/
I received a phone call this morning from David Stecher, an Atchison native, and seminarian of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas studying in Rome. He went to the audience of Pope Benedict XVI and Communion and Liberation (Noon, Rome time; 5 AM Central Time) David said this meeting of the Pope with Communion and Liberation was the largest and most enthusiastic crowd he has seen in St. Peter’s Square since the funeral of Pope John Paul the Great, and the election of Pope Benedict XVI. The crowd filled the square and was backed up to the Tiber River.

This audience will be re-broadcast today, Saturday March 24 at 3 PM (Central Time) on EWTN. I watched the earlier showing, and the video of the part I missed because of our Morning Prayer at the Abbey. The actual event started this morning about five minutes past the hour. (so 5:05 AM instead of 5)

For more than the first hour there is a greeting from Fr. Carron explaining the day, the Angelus, and some beautiful music, interspersed with readings from our founder Monsignor Luigi Giussani, and videos of Giussani speaking.
The Pope’s entrance is dramatic. You can see the mutual love and respect between him and the movement.
After everyone sang the German version of Holy God We Praise Thy Name, Fr. Carron gave a stirring introduction to the Holy Father’s address, followed by words of Pope Benedict XVI in which the Holy Father recounted both his own impressions of the movement, and those of Pope John Paul II.

Tomorrow the CLU (university students in Communion and Liberation) from this region will be watching this at 3:00 PM in the Tower Classroom of Ferrell Hall here at Benedictine College. Go to the CL website, and the USA section to find other showings around the United States:
http://www.clonline.org/

_________________________________________________________________________ "(Blessed) Mother Teresa replied, 'It is Jesus to whom we do everything; we love Jesus.' Cardinal Hamer rightly writes, 'In this way, a fact that happened two thousand years ago becomes- what a paradox-the most clamorous and interesting novelty in the life today of so many young people' -in the life today of so many young people, of Mother Teresa, or our life, our time, our age. Mother Teresa was not a youngster, but she was certainly young at heart."
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, From a talk at the Basilica of St. Anthony of Padua, Italy, February 11, 1994.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



CL on EWTN twice
Communion and Liberation, which officially recognizes Saint Benedict to be its patron, will be meeting with Pope Benedict XVI this Saturday, March 24. The papal audience at Noon in St. Peter’s square, Rome time, will be broadcast here in America, thanks to the nice people at the Eternal Word Television network live at 5 AM (Central Time/ 6 AM Eastern Time) on Saturday. EWTN will also rebroadcast the show at 3 PM (Central Time/ 4 PM Eastern Time) on Saturday. We are grateful to EWTN, Vatican Radio, and Vatican television for bringing the world this historic day. Please tell your friends to watch in!

CLU students from the Kansas City area will be watching this as part of our Lenten retreat the following day, Sunday, March 25, at 3 PM in the Tower Classroom in Ferrell Hall. Other college students are welcome to join us!

Through valleys of darkness. In the last period of his life, Fr Giussani had to pass through the dark valley of sickness, of infirmity, of pain, of suffering, but here, too, his eyes were fixed on Jesus, and thus he remained true in all the suffering, seeing Jesus, he was able to rejoice; the joy of the Risen One was present, who even in the passion is the Risen One and gives us the true light and joy, and he knew that—as the psalm says—even passing though this valley, “I fear no evil because I know that You are with me, and I will dwell in the Father’s house.” This was his great strength, knowing that “You are with me.”
-Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVI on Sacred Music
Finally, while respecting various styles and different and highly praiseworthy traditions, I desire, in accordance with the request advanced by the Synod Fathers, that Gregorian chant be suitably esteemed and employed as the chant proper to the Roman liturgy. (Cf. Second Vatican Ecumenical Council, Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy Sacrosanctum Concilium, 116; General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 41.)

Ravens Respect Life
Ravens Respect Life is hosting a talk here at Benedictine College for Social Justice Week. The talk will take place on Thursday (This evening) at 7:00 in Ferrell Lounge where most of the other talks are taking place. The guest speaker will be Ron Kelsey, Pro Life Consultant for the Archdiocese of Kansas City and his talk is named: "Morning after Pill-another abortifacient called a contraceptive." He will be discussing contraception, the Pill, RU 486 and the Church's stance/teaching on contraception. Come with questions and enjoy.

URGENT TOPEKA CAPITOL RALLY

To urge Kansas State Representatives to:
"Charge Tiller: It's the Law"!
Next TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 10:00 A.M. TO 2:00 P.M.,
WITH NOON PRESS CONFERENCE!
Location in Capitol to be announced. You can't have signs in capitol so wear red or get a "Charge Tiller: It's the Law"
red T-shirt when you get there!
Please make a special effort to be there to strongly
urge your representative to pass a House Resolution
to direct A.G. Morrison to charge Tiller.
Mary Kay Culp, Executive Director
David Gittrich, State Development Director
Alan Hansen, State KFL Board President

_________________________________________________________________________ "(Blessed) Mother Teresa replied, 'It is Jesus to whom we do everything; we love Jesus.' Cardinal Hamer rightly writes, 'In this way, a fact that happened two thousand years ago becomes- what a paradox-the most clamorous and interesting novelty in the life today of so many young people' -in the life today of so many young people, of Mother Teresa, or our life, our time, our age. Mother Teresa was not a youngster, but she was certainly young at heart."
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, From a talk at the Basilica of St. Anthony of Padua, Italy, February 11, 1994.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Solemnity of the Death of
Our Holy Father Saint Benedict

Today Benedictines from around the world celebrate the Death of our Holy Father Saint Benedict. For many of the Congregations of monks and nuns this is a Feast, but our Congregation retained this as our Solemnity. Happy Solemnity!!!

In regions where monasteries exist, the vocation of these communities is to further the participation of the faithful in the Liturgy of the Hours and to provide necessary solitude for more intense personal prayer.
-Catechism of the Catholic Church, #2691

Masses on Campus Today: All School Mass in Abbey Church at 2:00 PM.
Also, 12:05 and 9:30 PM in St. Martin’s Chapel, and 5:15 PM Abbey Church.

Vespers with the monks for the Solemnity, 7 PM, Abbey Church
Don’t forget the Knights of Columbus speakers, Patty Lewis and John Schmidt this evening at 7 PM in the O’Malley McAlister Auditorium. Concert with Tom Booth at 7:30 PM, Roost area (official opening of new BC coffee house.
I’ll be blessing an image of the medal of St. Benedict painted on the first floor of Turner Hall after Vespers this evening.

CL on EWTN twice

Communion and Liberation, which officially recognizes Saint Benedict to be its patron, will be meeting with Pope Benedict XVI this Saturday, March 24. The papal audience at Noon in St. Peter’s square, Rome time, will be broadcast here in America, thanks to the nice people at the Eternal Word Television network live at 5 AM (Central Time/ 6 AM Eastern Time) on Saturday. EWTN will also rebroadcast the show at 3 PM (Central Time/ 4 PM Eastern Time) on Saturday.

Medal of Saint Benedict
Many people have the medal of St. Benedict. Below is a description of the rich symbolism of this medal. In 1647 scholars found a 1415 document from the Abbey of St. Michael the Archangel in Metten, Bavaria (the house in Germany where our Congregation was founded from.) The document explained the letters of the medal, and I have included that here.

The Cross of Eternal Salvation
On the face of the medal is the image of Saint Benedict. In his right hand he holds the cross, the Christian's symbol of salvation. The cross reminds us of the zealous work of evangelizing and civilizing England and Europe carried out mainly by the Benedictine monks and nuns, especially for the sixth to the ninth/tenth centuries.

Rule and Raven
In St. Benedict's left hand is his Rule for Monasteries that could well be summed up in the words of the Prolog exhorting us to "walk in God's ways, with the Gospel as our guide."

On a pedestal to the right of St. Benedict is the poisoned cup, shattered when he made the sign of the cross over it. On a pedestal to the left is a raven about to carry away a loaf of poisoned bread that a jealous enemy had sent to St. Benedict.

C. S. P. B.
Above the cup and the raven are the Latin words: Crux s. patris Benedicti (The Cross of our holy father Benedict). On the margin of the medal, encircling the figure of Benedict, are the Latin words: Eius in obitu nostro praesentia muniamur! (May we be strengthened by his presence in the hour of our death!). Benedictines have always regarded St. Benedict as a special patron of a happy death. He himself died in the chapel at Montecassino while standing with his arms raised up to heaven, supported by the brothers of the monastery, shortly after St. Benedict had received Holy Communion.
Monte Cassino

Below Benedict we read: ex SM Casino MDCCCLXXX (from holy Monte Cassino, 1880). This is the medal struck to commemorate the 1400th anniversary of the birth of Saint Benedict.
Reverse Side of the Medal
Crux mihi lux

On the back of the medal, the cross is dominant. On the arms of the cross are the initial letters of a rhythmic Latin prayer: Crux sacra sit mihi lux! Nunquam draco sit mihi dux! (May the holy cross be my light! May the dragon never be my guide!).

In the angles of the cross, the letters C S P B stand for Crux Sancti Patris Benedicti (The cross of our holy father Benedict).
Peace
Above the cross is the word pax (peace), that has been a Benedictine motto for centuries. Around the margin of the back of the medal, the letters V R S N S M V - S M Q L I V B are the initial letters, as mentioned above, of a Latin prayer of exorcism against Satan: Vade retro Satana! Nunquam suade mihi vana! Sunt mala quae libas. Ipse venena bibas! (Begone Satan! Never tempt me with your vanities! What you offer me is evil. Drink the poison yourself!)

Pope Benedict XVI on Sacred Music
From Sacramentum Caritatis, February 22, 2007
The People of God assembled for the liturgy sings the praises of God. In the course of her two-thousand-year history, the Church has created, and still creates, music and songs which represent a rich patrimony of faith and love. This heritage must not be lost. Certainly as far as the liturgy is concerned, we cannot say that one song is as good as another. Generic improvisation or the introduction of musical genres which fail to respect the meaning of the liturgy should be avoided. As an element of the liturgy, song should be well integrated into the overall celebration.
-Pope Benedict XVI Sacramentum Caritatis

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Speakers This evening Teddy Roosevelt and G.K. Chesterton. This evening, Tuesday, March 20, 7:30 PM, O’Malley-McAlister Auditorium, Benedictine College. With Chuck Chalberg and Dale Alquist.

The presentation this evening will not only be about G.K. Chesterton. Chuck Chalberg will spend the first part of the evening doing an impersonation of Teddy Roosevelt. Then, he and Dale Alquist will present about G.K. Chesterton:

Apostle of Common Sense.
Dr. John "Chuck" Chalberg delights many audiences throughout the United States with his historical impersonations of American and British characters, such as President Theodore Roosevelt and G.K. Chesterton.
From: HISTORYONSTAGE.COM!

Knights of Columbus Speakers on Wednesday
This Wednesday, at 7 PM in the Ferrell Hall Lounge for Social Justice Week the Knights of Columbus will present speaker Patty Lewis, founder of Alexandra's House, a prenatal counseling center for parents who are expecting their children to die before or shortly after birth. She started this program shortly after her own niece died after birth. She is based in Kansas City and recently was a counselor for John and Jennifer Schmidt who lost their baby girl Gianna on March 5th. Patty will be speaking about the ethics of pre-natal counseling and her program. John Schmidt will also be sharing some of his family's experience with Gianna. Jennifer works in BC's counseling department and is the former director of McDonald Hall. John is a 4th degree Knight and former member of the college Knights of Columbus council here. Please come to hear and support.

Jake Livingston
Past Grand Knight 4708

Other Social Justice Week talks
All events now planned for Farrell Hall Lounge
Weekday Event time may differ by group.
Likeliest start times 7 and 8 p.m.

March 19 HALO (Monday)

March 20 Campus Ministry – Mass for Social Justice Week (Tuesday) 9:30 p.m.

March 21 Knights of Columbus (See the story just above this one) (Wednesday)

March 22 Ravens Respect Life (Thursday)

March 24 Hunger Coalition Noon – 2 p.m. Global Banquet event (Saturday) Delora Musslin BC ’99 “My Work in the Peace Corps – Niger”

March 26 Black Student Union (Monday)

CL on EWTN
The Eternal Word Television Network, EWTN, will be broadcasting live the papal audience of Pope Benedict XVI and Communion and Liberation in St. Peter’s Square. Tune in, or record and watch later, this Saturday morning, March 24, 2007 (not Sunday as I had earlier said) from 5-6:30 AM Central Time on EWTN.

Other Happenings
Wednesday, March 21, Solemnity of the Death of our Holy Father Saint Benedict. All School Mass at Benedictine College at 2:00 PM in the Abbey Church. There will also be the regular 12:05 PM St. Martin’s Chapel Mass, and Abbey Mass at 5:15 PM.
Wednesday, March 21, 7:30 PM, Tom Booth, a nationally recognized and award-winning Christian musician, will give an intimate “coffee house” style concert at Benedictine College at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, 2007. His performance will take place in the Raven Roost, a relaxed, wood-paneled lounge in the Haverty Center on the Benedictine campus, Booth has composed and performed for Mother Teresa and Pope John Paul II and has earned numerous Dove, Unity and Grammy awards and nominations for both solo projects and collaborations. Tickets are $5 and will be on sale at the door. A special package price of $12 is also available for those interested in attending both the Booth concert and the annual Benedictine College Guitarfest, scheduled for Saturday, April 14, featuring Matt Maher. Guitarfest tickets are $10.
The St. Benedict’s College Council of the Knights of Columbus will be having a Lenten mini retreat in the lower lounge of the Abbey guesthouse this Friday-Saturday for Knights.
Communion and Liberation University students from the region will be having a Lenten retreat this Sunday (Exact time and place TBA). Contact Fr. Meinrad to find out more information at mmiller@benedictine.edu
March 30-April 1 BCK6, Koinonia Retreat for Benedictine College students at the Catholic parish in Fall City, Ne. Koinonia is a retreat that helps young men and women to enhance their relationship with Jesus Christ and the Catholic Church.
April 5-8, St. Benedict’s Abbey Holy Week Retreat for college students. For more information, or to sign up, contact Prior James Albers at ext 7830 (off campus: 913-360-7830.
Every Friday during Lent: Stations of the Cross and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, St. Martin’s Chapel Memorial Hall, 3 PM. This year we are using the meditations of Cardinal John Henry Newman.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI
Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



The Eternal Word Television Network, EWTN, will be broadcasting live the papal audience of Pope Benedict XVI and Communion and Liberation in St. Peter’s Square. Tune in, or record and watch later, this Saturday morning, March 24, 2007 (not Sunday as I had earlier said) from 5-6:30 AM Central Time.

Fr Giussani proposed the “companionship” of Christ to very many youngsters who, now adults, consider him their spiritual “father.” He set aside every prospect of an academic career and devoted himself to the formation of students needing points of reference and models for inspiration. In the sixties, he began his evangelizing activity presenting the truth of the faith with an open and unceasing dialogue, with a coherent docility to the Church’s magisterium, and above all with an exemplary witness of life. Thus was born the Movement of Communion and Liberation, which grew in the course of the years thanks to the apostolic ardor of this fervent Ambrosian priest, who was able to engage many disciples in an impassioned missionary journey. -Pope John Paul II

Monsignor Giussani, with his fearless and unfailing faith, knew that, even in this situation, Christ, the encounter with Him, remains central, because whoever does not give God, gives too little, and whoever does not give God, whoever does not make people find God in the face of Christ, does not build, but destroys, because he gets human activity lost in ideological and false dogmatisms. -Pope Benedict XVI

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Exciting upcoming Events at Benedictine College

Tuesday, March 20, 7:30 PM, O’Malley-McAlister Auditorium. G.K. Chesterton, Apostle of Common Sense. Dale Alquist and Chuck Chalmberg. As seen on EWTN.
Wednesday, March 21, Solemnity of the Death of our Holy Father Saint Benedict. All School Mass at Benedictine College at 2:00 PM in the Abbey Church. There will also be the regular Abbey Mass at 5:15 PM.
Wednesday, March 21, 7:30 PM, Tom Booth, a nationally recognized and award-winning Christian musician, will give an intimate “coffee house” style concert at Benedictine College at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, 2007. His performance will take place in the Raven Roost, a relaxed, wood-paneled lounge in the Haverty Center on the Benedictine campus, Booth has composed and performed for Mother Teresa and Pope John Paul II and has earned numerous Dove, Unity and Grammy awards and nominations for both solo projects and collaborations. Tickets are $5 and will be on sale at the door. A special package price of $12 is also available for those interested in attending both the Booth concert and the annual Benedictine College Guitarfest, scheduled for Saturday, April 14, featuring Matt Maher. Guitarfest tickets are $10.
The St. Benedict’s College Council of the Knights of Columbus will be having a Lenten mini retreat in the lower lounge of the Abbey guesthouse this Friday-Saturday for Knights.
Communion and Liberation University students from the region will be having a Lenten retreat this Sunday (Exact time and place TBA). Contact Fr. Meinrad to find out more information at mmiller@benedictine.edu
March 30-April 1 BCK6, Koinonia Retreat for Benedictine College students at the Catholic parish in Fall City, Ne. Koinonia is a retreat that helps young men and women to enhance their relationship with Jesus Christ and the Catholic Church.
April 5-8, St. Benedict’s Abbey Holy Week Retreat for college students. For more information, or to sign up, contact Prior James Albers at ext 7830 (off campus: 913-360-7830.
Every Friday during Lent: Stations of the Cross and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, St. Martin’s Chapel Memorial Hall, 3 PM. This year we are using the meditations of Cardinal John Henry Newman.

Pope Benedict XVI to host a papal audience for Communion and Liberation on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of papal recognition.

On July 11, 1980, the eyes of the Church were on the Benedictine order as it celebrated the 1500th Birthday of its founder, St. Benedict. Something else was happening that very day at the Abbey of Montecassino where St. Benedict is buried. On that day Abbot Martino Matronola received twelve people along with Monsignor Luigi Giussani and constituted them as a canonical association. The Abbot of Montecassino on the Feast of the great patriarch of western monks placed the fraternity of Communion and Liberation under the protection of the Immaculate Virgin and our Patron Saint Benedict.

Pope John Paul II wanted this recognition to come from a higher source than just the Abbot of Montecassino. So on February 11, 1982, the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes, a decree was issued by the Pontifical Council on the Laity, a dicastery that had been established by Pope Paul VI following the Second Vatican Council. The decree said that it establishes and confirms as a juridical entity for the universal Church the Fraternity declaring it to all effects an Association of Pontifical Right and decreeing that it be recognized as such by all.

And so 25 years and a little over a month later, Pope Benedict XVI has invited members of Communion and Liberation to a special Papal Audience in St. Peter’s Square this coming Sunday, March 24, 2007 at Noon. All of us members of CL are encouraged to pray the Angelus daily to prepare our hearts for the meeting of the Successor of Peter with our Fraternity. Hopefully we will find a place to watch the audience live at 5 AM our time this coming Saturday morning.

Social Justice Week at Benedictine College

March 19 — 26, 2007

Certainly, the restoration of justice, reconciliation and forgiveness are the conditions for building true peace. The recognition of this fact leads to a determination to transform unjust structures and to restore respect for the dignity of all men and women, created in God's image and likeness. Through the concrete fulfilment of this responsibility, the Eucharist becomes in life what it signifies in its celebration. As I have had occasion to say, it is not the proper task of the Church to engage in the political work of bringing about the most just society possible; nonetheless she cannot and must not remain on the sidelines in the struggle for justice. The Church "has to play her part through rational argument and she has to reawaken the spiritual energy without which justice, which always demands sacrifice, cannot prevail and prosper." -Pope Benedict XVI, Sacramentum Caritatis, #89, February 22, 2007

All events now planned for Farrell Hall Lounge
Weekday Event time may differ by group.
Likeliest start times 7 and 8 p.m.

March 19 HALO
(Monday)

March 20 Campus Ministry – Mass for Social Justice Week
(Tuesday) 9:30 p.m.

March 21 Knights of Columbus
(Wednesday)

March 22 Ravens Respect Life
(Thursday)

March 24 Hunger Coalition Noon – 2 p.m. Global Banquet event
(Saturday) Delora Musslin BC ’99 “My Work in the Peace Corps – Niger”

March 26 Black Student Union
(Monday)

Ronald Reagan on Human Life

As we continue to work to overturn Roe v. Wade, we must also continue to lay the groundwork for a society in which abortion is not the accepted answer to unwanted pregnancy. Pro-life people have already taken heroic steps, often at great personal sacrifice, to provide for unwed mothers. I recently spoke about a young pregnant woman named Victoria, who said, "In this society we save whales, we save timber wolves and bald eagles and Coke bottles. Yet, everyone wanted me to throw away my baby." She has been helped by Save-a-Life, a group in Dallas, which provides a way for unwed mothers to preserve the human life within them when they might otherwise be tempted to resort to abortion. I think also of House of His Creation in Catesville, Pennsylvania, where a loving couple has taken in almost 200 young women in the past ten years. They have seen, as a fact of life, that the girls are not better off having abortions than saving their babies. I am also reminded of the remarkable Rossow family of Ellington, Connecticut, who have opened their hearts and their home to nine handicapped adopted and foster children.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Saint Patrick’s Day
The following is from Dr. William Hyland, an Oblate of Saint Benedict’s Abbey, and a researcher in Norbertine Studies at St. Norbert’s College, Wisconsin

This year's offering is taken from a late medieval work known as THE GOLDEN LEGEND. The author and compiler was a Dominican friar who later became archbishop of Genoa and was beatified, named Jacobus de Voragine. It contains many stories about saints, and was widely known and an important inspiration for artists. The following two stories, among others, are found under the feast of St. Patrick:

Once Patrick was preaching to the king of the Scots (i.e. Irish) about Christ's passion, standing before him and leaning on the staff that he held in his hand. By accident he put the sharp point of the staff on the king's foot and so pierced the foot. The king thought that the holy bishop had done this deliberately and that he himself could not receive the faith of Christ otherwise than by suffering like this for Christ, so he bore the pain patiently. Marveling at this, the saint prayed and healed the king's foot. He also obtained from God that no poisonous reptile could live in the whole province; and it is said that in answer to his prayer even the woods and bark from the trees in that region effectively counteract poison.

Then there was a man who stole a sheep from his neighbor and ate the sheep. Saint Patrick called upon the thief, whoever he might be, to make restitution for the theft, but no one came forward; so one day, when all the people were gathered together, he commanded in the name of Christ that the sheep should bleat in the belly of the one who had eaten it. The sheep bleated, the guilty man did penance, and from then on all were careful to avoid the sin of theft.

Have a wonderful day!!
Slán agus beannacht,
William Patrick Hyland
G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.

You are invited, on the Eve of the Feast of St. Benedict, to:
G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 7:30 PM
O'Malley McAllister Auditorium
Benedictine College, Atchison, KS.
Free. The public is welcome.

Saint Benedict’s Day concert

Tom Booth, a nationally recognized and award-winning Christian musician, will give an intimate “coffee house” style concert at Benedictine College at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, 2007. His performance will take place in the Raven Roost, a relaxed, wood-paneled lounge in the Haverty Center on the Benedictine campus, in conjunction with the grand opening of a student-run coffee shop.

All School Mass
There will be an All-school Mass at Benedictine College on March 21, the Feast of the Death of our Holy Father Saint Benedict at 2:00 PM in the Saint Benedict’s Abbey Church.

Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist
By Deal Hudson
A right turn up the driveway leads to a bundle of red-bricked, copper-roofed buildings topped with a dome and bell-tower reminiscent of a small Italian city. Under the dome sits one of the loveliest chapels to be found anywhere.

Dedicated the previous day (the chapel was brilliantly designed by Gus Pappas, a Greek orthodox architect) to my eyes and ears, the chapel succeeded in what chapels are meant to do — bring a bit of heaven to earth and inspire prayer in those who enter there.

The Sisters were celebrating a Mass of Thanksgiving, giving thanks for those who provided the resources for the buildings, not only the chapel, but also the adjacent structures. After my visit there, I found myself giving thanks for this remarkable flowering of women's religious life. (The other equally dynamic community of women's religious I've seen for myself is the Dominican Sisters in Nashville, Tennessee.)

The last time I visited the Sisters was nine years ago, the year of their founding. They were living, all four of them, in a ranch-style home converted for their use near Domino Farms, then the command center for the many apostolates funded by Tom Monaghan.

Founded by Cardinal O'Connor, invited to Michigan by Bishop Mengeling, and funded initially by Monaghan, the Dominican Sisters now number 59, a growth rate of 1400 percent. They are expected to be 70 in all by 2007. Sr. Joseph Andrew, speaking at the luncheon afterward, remarked that, "We are growing so fast we cannot assume a roof over our heads." She added that this was a "good problem" to have.

The average age of the professed Sisters is 28, and the average age of those in the novitiate is 24. Astoundingly, 173 young women attended their vocations retreat in February of this year. I'm sure I wasn't the only person in the room who compared this community to all of the religious orders that are dying because of a lack of vocations.

Mother Assumpta Long, the driving force behind the community, has a simple explanation for their success: "It all begins in the chapel. If it doesn't happen there, it's not going to happen. The most important thing is our religious life." ------------------------------------------------------------------------

The average age of the professed Sisters is 28, and the average age of those in the novitiate is 24. Astoundingly, 173 young women attended their vocations retreat in February of this year (2006). ------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Sisters are trained to be teachers. They already run two schools in Ann Arbor, but soon they will be sending two groups of four Sisters each to Hilton Head, SC and Phoenix, AR at the request of Bishops Baker and Olmstead.

The chapel's seating consists mainly of stalls, 87 of them, so you feel like a monk or nun of old, as you participate in the community's worship. Though the chapel's acoustics are rich, the singing of the sisters never lost its clarity. The words from Psalm 42 set among the four harmonic lines of Palestrina's most beautiful work, "Sicut Cervus," were easily heard. (The sisters sing so well they should be recorded.) Sr. Philip John, it should be noted, plays a very mean trumpet, and Sr. Maria Caritas an exceptionally sweet violin.

The Sisters receive a steady stream of requests from across the country for teachers. As they prepare to send their first groups to posts outside the Motherhouse in Ann Arbor, the Sisters are aware they have reached a milestone, in only nine short years.

The growth, vitality, and good work of the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist, embodies the ongoing revival of the Catholic faith in the U.S. since the election of John Paul II in 1978.

Upcoming vocation retreat with the Sisters.

For more information you can reach the Sisters by email at info@sistersofmary.org, or go to their website, www.sistersofmary.org. See their vocations page here which includes short reflections from each of the women now in formation.

Their upcoming retreats are:

February 24-25, 2007
* May 26-27, 2007
* November 3-4, 2007
* December 1-2, 2008* Women's Retreat
* February 23-24, 2008
* May 24-25, 2008
Times: 2:00 PM on Saturday to 3:00 PM on Sunday.

For more information about the retreats see the contact information below. Due to space limitations, your registration will be secured when we receive the $25.00 registration fee.

Location:
Spiritus Sanctus Academy - Ann Arbor
4101 Joy Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 996-3855

Contact: Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz, O.P.
Vocations Director
734.994.7437
sjab@sistersofmary.org

Sisters Servants of Mary, Kansas City, invitation to Home school families for a vocation retreat:

What: Vocation Retreat
Who: Girls 11 to 14 years of age
When: April 13, 2007 from 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Where: Sisters, Servants of Mary
800 North 18th Street
Kansas City, Kansas 66102
(913)371-3423 or vocservantsmkc@yahoo.com

Please send in the following information to the above address
or e-mail. Please contact Sr. Eliut Vega or leave a message
Name________________________ Age_____
Address__________________________________
________________________________________
Telephone_________________________________
E-mail____________________________________
Parents consent signatures:
________________________________________
________________________________________
If there is anything, we must know about your child=s health for this event please enclose the information.
Food Allergies ______________________________

Holy Week at the Abbey
April 5-8, 2007
Holy Thursday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
7:30 PM Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
3:00 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion

Holy Saturday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Evening Prayer
8:30 PM Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday
7:00 AM Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

Father most holy,
look upon the blood flowing from the Saviour's pierced side; look upon the blood shed by the many victims of hatred, of war, of terrorism, and in your mercy, grant that the course of world events may unfold according to your will, in justice and in peace, and that your Church may devote herself with quiet confidence to your service and to the liberation of mankind.
-Pope John Paul II, Good Friday, 2003

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XV

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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The following article, and interview appeared in the January, 2007 edition of Traces both in Italian and English describe how Communion and Liberation has taken root here in Atchison. The encounter with Christ I have had through Communion and Liberation has been great. It is something I could never in a million years have planned, yet it has been a gift to me.

To read more about Traces, or better yet, to subscribe, go to: http://www.traces-cl.com/

USA The Benedictines and the Movement

The monk&the captain
What makes us grow and broadens our mind is not an abstract reasoning, but finding in humanity a moment when the truth is attained and uttered. (Fr. Giussani)
These pages of Traces tell of the unexpected encounter with the Benedictines of Atchison, Kansas, a presence in this town since 1855. (N.B. In Kansas since 1855, officially a monastery since 1857) The meetings at Benedictine College, the birth of the CL community, and the Memores Domini house in Atchison tell a story that is so exceptional that it points only to God

by Maurizio Maniscalco

Atchison, Kansas. Ten thousand souls in a small town whose true story was written and continues to be shaped by its Benedictine monks, here, along the shores of the Missouri River.
Atchison’s Benedictine College is home to one of the newest, youngest, and liveliest CL communities in the United States. I can still remember when I showed Fr. Giussani that little point on the map, the first outpost of the Movement in Kansas, the land of enormous farms and bison. The farms are still here–just look at the huge silos that still reign in the countryside, while the railroad dominates the center of town–but it’s pretty hard to find bison any more.

The Benedictines arrived here in 1855, following the German priest Fr. Henry Peter Lemcke, a Lutheran pastor who had converted to Catholicism. Two years later, while the political battle that would lead to the Civil War was heating up, the monks founded their abbey, and the next year, with the gift of a piece of land, established a parish and a school. Those were hard years; historians call that period bleeding Kansas, but the monks have always been builders of civilization.

Today, Benedictine College, with its 1,200 students, has also become the home of a beautiful CL community. How? The Lord’s ways are infinite, and the story of our little presence in Atchison documents this fully. Everything began with an improbable combination of characters: an Army captain stationed in Missouri, an administrative manager who lives in California, and a monk who came to Benedictine College for a degree but also found his vocation here, choosing to follow the tradition that still bears fruit today.

Captain Jones brought me here in 2002 to meet Fr. Meinrad and the other monks, animated by his certainty that the Benedictine monks couldn’t help but love the experience of the Movement. But one of the most curious discoveries of that trip was that Fr. Meinrad had been the college roommate of BJ Adamson, now with the San Diego CL community. In this providential weave of events (providential in the true sense: given by Providence!), I proposed a public presentation of The Religious Sense, the text we were working on at the time. So, in September 2002, with Fr. Meinrad totally enamored of this strange new thing he had encountered, Monsignor Albacete presented The Religious Sense in the college’s spacious auditorium and, from that moment on, the miraculous story of the Movement in the United States became “contagious” in other towns of Kansas as well. That day, among others present were Jerry Brungardt and John Traffas of Wichita, from the southeast of the state, a three-hour drive from Atchison. Jerry, a physician and father of a tribe of ten children, had learned about the presentation on the college’s website and had taken a day off to visit Benedictine, his alma mater with which he still had a strong bond. John had brought his son, soon to choose a university, to visit the campus.

In the past four years, many things have happened. Today, Jerry and John are the pillars of the Wichita community. Benedictine hosted presentations of the entire PerCorso Trilogy and also of Giussani’s The Psalms. After having welcomed the June 2004 “Communion and Liberation National Council” gathering, the relationship with the Movement has deepened even more, in particular with the Dean of Academics, Kimberly Shankman.

Today, a stone’s throw from the campus, there is a new Memores Domini house, with three friends who have made Benedictine College their daily fare: Salvatore (the first to arrive in September of that year), Business Professor and Director of the International Education Center; Steve, Library Director; and Daniele, Director of the Studies Abroad Program.
Recently, a discussion was organized after the Holy Father’s trip to Germany and his Regensburg lecture. With guest speaker Luca Grillo, a doctoral student in Classics at Princeton University, there were three professors from Benedictine: Dr. Macierowski, a philosopher; Dr. Snyder, a historian; and Dr. Blosser, a theologian. By now, when the Movement proposes something at Benedictine, professors and students flock to it, curious and open.

But this time, for me, after over twelve years roving the great plains of the United States, the most moving thing was seeing the faces of the first two students to welcome us, freshmen Matt and Beth. I had met Matt when he was a little boy in the snowy cold of St. Cloud, Minnesota, where John and Ann, his parents and my dear friends of the early days, still live. Beth was a pre-teen when I saw her playing on the frozen lake in front of the Stokman home in Crosby, northern Minnesota.

Seeing a new community like the one in Atchison flower is a special grace. Seeing how a new community also becomes the home of young people raised in families that have embraced the charism of the Movement is an equally great miracle.

From Regensburg
to Atchison
The story of the discovery of Fr. Giussani in the words of the Subprior of the Atchison Abbey: “I believe that the Movement has helped me recognize that, here and now, with these monks, I encounter Christ”

edited by Maurizio Maniscalco

Fr. Meinrad Miller is a way beyond six feet of Benedictine monk. In his forties, originally from Leoti, Kansas, a passionate scholar of Theology and reader of everything, he is also a brilliant organist. Currently, he serves as Subprior of the Atchison Abbey, with its sixty monks, and as a professor in Benedictine College’s Theology Department. He is a great friend, the person who made Fr. Giussani and the Movement at home in Atchison.

Fr. Meinrad, how did you discover Fr. Giussani?
I had a college friend here at Benedictine, BJ Adamson, who, having attended a course on Ethics his senior year (this was 1987) and read Aristotle, went around with a great question about the need for friendship and happiness. When he returned to Denver after his studies, he encountered CL members. Later, he moved to California, and there as well he found the Movement waiting for him. From 1987 to 2002, every time I saw or heard from him, BJ would tell me about Communion and Liberation. I sincerely thought to myself that he was exaggerating, that it was too good to be true.

Having now encountered the friendship and the thought of Fr. Giussani, I, too, have become someone who often seems to exaggerate…

You met Fr. Giussani through books. What struck you?
I’ve found that Giussani is a man able to respond to many of the questions I carry around. We’re often told that the fundamental choice in life is between a sterile rationalism or a pietistic moralism. In Giussani, instead, I’ve found someone who understands the human and the encounter with God in a living, new way, yet profoundly rooted in the tradition of the faith.

And the people you’ve encountered?
An attractive life. They have a friendship and a freedom that corresponded to something deep down in me. I was talking with a new graduate of ours, a brilliant young man. He told me a story similar to mine. He had been writing poetry for years, searching for the meaning of things, and then discovered that what he had been thinking and writing corresponded to the encounter with CL.

And with the other monks?
Monks are not famous for their propensity for change. When you’ve been on the field for 1,500 years, it may seem that there’s no need to hurry. I invited the monks to the presentation and shared Giussani’s judgments and Albacete’s reflections. The posters are also beautiful instruments for educating the heart to what the Movement is.
Many of them receive Traces and read it regularly. In addition, parts of the PerCorso are used as study texts.

And how have they responded?
As in all things, some are enthusiastic, others less so. In general, there’s interest in the Movement and the love for Saint Benedict that Fr. Giussani has always shown.

What does Fr. Giussani have to do with your life as a Benedictine today?
One of the mortal vices identified in ancient monastic thought was sloth. The way I interpret the descriptions of Evagrius and John Cassian, it is the capital sin of “the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.” Before meeting the Movement, I day-dreamed of being in the perfect monastery, in the perfect university. I believe that the Movement has helped me recognize that, here and now, with this group of monks, with these students, these friends of the Abbey, I encounter Christ who makes me free.

How did the “sons” of Benedict arrive here?
The first to arrive was Fr. Peter Lemcke, a Lutheran who had converted to Catholicism. I was re-reading his diary, where he spoke of his rejection of the Enlightenment thinking of many and the pietism of many others. Lemcke felt “at home” with Bishop Sailer, in Regensburg, just as Cardinal Ratzinger did 140 years later. He was then assigned as chaplain to the household of Friederich Schlosser, the son of Goethe’s sister. One evening, the Romantic poet Clemens Brentano and Andreas Raess–who would later become the Bishop of Strasbourg–told him that Bishop Kendrick of Philadelphia was in great need of priests. Brentano made fun of him, saying that, staying comfortably in Germany, he was becoming a “luxury chaplain, big and fat.” And Lemcke set out. If he hadn’t done so, there would be no abbey, monastery, or college. Just like Abraham who picked up and moved out, or Fr. Giussani with his act of faith to throw himself into teaching high school, this Lutheran ex-pastor’s choice is what brought me here.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

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by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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The Founder of St. Benedict’s Abbey writing about King Ludwig I of Bavaria, and the Benedictines.

In Munich, I had an audience with the wonderful, but aging, King Ludwig. He spoke with me for a long time and just did not tire of having me tell him everything I could about America. He dismissed me with a kingly donation.

What happened at this time in Munich was something that not only affected my future but it was something that was to have an enormous influence on the future of the entire ecclesiastical state of the region in which I had worked for the past ten years. One day, I was having a noon meal with the Benedictines of Metten Abbey, the monks there were in charge of a “gymnasium” school. Naturally, much was said about America and the status of the church there. I asked rather jokingly if there might not be some priest monks who would be interested in going back with me since we now had a new Bishop, and that he had specifically commissioned me to search out German priests for his diocese. After the meal, one of the professors, Father Boniface Wimmer, took me aside and confided to me that he had nurtured for a long time the desire to go to America as a missionary7. He informed me that he would be most grateful if I would help him in bringing this about. I told him: “Don’t go just as a single missionary. Go as Benedictines. Look into this possibility, and the possibility of also inviting a few Brothers. Make your plea for permission to establish a Benedictine monastery in America. Should this happen, I will then become a member of the foundation. I say this because sixteen years ago, when Metten was re-opened as a monastery, I had harbored the thought of entering the order. In America, I have the pastoral care of a huge district and I privately own a large tract of land so that I am in a position to help you get properly established.” Then I gave him my address, begged him to write to me as to how things were unfolding, and I departed, loaded down with money, books, and all sorts of items to be used for the church itself8.

Notre Dame de Sion
The Freshmen girls from Notre Dame de Sion High School in Kansas City will be here today learning about the Benedictine Order. They will have tours of the Abbey and the Mount Monastery.

Sisters Servants of Mary, Kansas City, invitation to Home school families for a vocation retreat:

What: Vocation Retreat
Who: Girls 11 to 14 years of age
When: April 13, 2007 from 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Where: Sisters, Servants of Mary
800 North 18th Street
Kansas City, Kansas 66102
(913)371-3423 or vocservantsmkc@yahoo.com

Please send in the following information to the above address
or e-mail. Please contact Sr. Eliut Vega or leave a message

Name________________________ Age_____
Address__________________________________
________________________________________
Telephone_________________________________
E-mail____________________________________
Parents consent signatures:
________________________________________
________________________________________
If there is anything, we must know about your child=s health for this event please enclose the information.
Food Allergies ______________________________

The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist,
(http://www.sistersofmary.org/ ) are a Roman Catholic community of women religious founded as a response to Pope John Paul II’s call for new religious foundations to embody the graces of the new evangelization of the third millennium Church.

The sisters offer a series of joy-filled weekend retreat centered on the Real Presence of Jesus that are attended by hundreds of young women discerning religious vocations, as well as married women seeking a deeper understanding of their roles as Catholic wives and mothers, are deepening their spiritual life and learning about their responsibilities in the heritage of the Church.

I am honored that Sr. Joseph Andrew has asked me to be the spiritual director for the May retreat this year.

Their upcoming retreats are:

February 24-25, 2007
* May 26-27, 2007
* November 3-4, 2007
* December 1-2, 2008* Women's Retreat
* February 23-24, 2008
* May 24-25, 2008
Times: 2:00 PM on Saturday to 3:00 PM on Sunday.

For more information about the retreats see the contact information below.
Due to space limitations, your registration will be secured when we receive the $25.00 registration fee.

Location:
Spiritus Sanctus Academy - Ann Arbor
4101 Joy Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 996-3855

Contact: Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz, O.P.
Vocations Director
734.994.7437
sjab@sistersofmary.org

Kansas Pro-Life: Alexa’s Law

This past year, a young, beautiful 8th grade girl who was nearly full-term with a baby was murdered in Wichita. And you might remember a couple of years ago in California, Scott Peterson killed his wife when she was nearly full-term in her pregnancy. Scott Peterson was charged with two murders.

But here in Kansas it's different. Chelsea Brooks was nearly full-term in her pregnancy when she was killed and the baby died as well. The murderer was only charged with one murder because the baby is not considered a person worthy of protection.

Chelsea Brooks and her family had named the to-be-born baby, Alexa. The bill under consideration in the Kansas Senate would make the killing of Alexa a crime as well as the killing of her mother. The bill is called Alexa's Law. It passed overwhelmingly in the Kansas House and now is in the Kansas Senate Judiciary Committee.

Please contact all or some of the following Senators on that committee and urge them to pass Alexa's Law. A child, born or unborn, should have the same protection under the law.

Chairman: John Vratil from Leawood -- Office # 785-296-7361 vratil@senate.state.ks.us
Vice-Chair: Terry Bruce from Hutchinson -- Office # 785-296-7300 bruce@senate.state.ks.us
Barbara Allen from Overland Park -- Office # 785-296-7353 allen@senate.state.ks.us
Les Donovan from Wichita -- Office # 785-296-7385 Donovan@senate.state.ks.us
Phillip Journey from Sedgwick County -- Office # 785-296-7367 journey@senate.state.ks.us
Julia Lynn from Olathe -- Office # 785-296-7382 lynn@senate.state.ks.us
Derek Schmidt from Independence -- Office # 785-296-2497 Schmidt@senate.state.ks.us
Dwayne Umbarger from Thayer -- Office # 785-296-7389 umbarger@senate.state.ks.us
Greta Goodwin from Winfield -- Office # 785-296-7381 goodwin@senate.state.ks.us
Donald Betts from Wichita -- Office # 785-296-7387 betts@senate.state.ks.us
David Haley from Kansas City -- Office # 785-296-7376 haley@senate.state.ks.us

G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.

You are invited, on the Eve of the Feast of St. Benedict, to:
G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 7:30 PM
O'Malley McAllister Auditorium
Benedictine College, Atchison, KS.
Free. The public is welcome.

Saint Benedict’s Day concert
P Tom Booth, a nationally recognized and award-winning Christian musician, will give an intimate “coffee house” style concert at Benedictine College at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, 2007. His performance will take place in the Raven Roost, a relaxed, wood-paneled lounge in the Haverty Center on the Benedictine campus, in conjunction with the grand opening of a student-run coffee shop.

2007 Summer Theology Institute, Roman Catholic Diocese of Wichita
How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization
July 19-21, 2007

Presenters:
Thomas E. Woods, Ph.D.
Fr. Meinrad Miller, O.S.B., M.Div.
Mrs. Jerrilyn Szelle Holladay, M.A.

Time: Keynote address on Thursday, July 19 at 7 p.m., Institute classes in session Friday and Saturday, July 20-21 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Cost: Commuter Tuition for the Institute on or before June 22: $100, after June 22: $125 (books and meals extra); resident tuition for the Institute on or before June 22: $200, after June 22: $225, includes room and board (books extra).
Contact the Spiritual Life Center of the Diocese of Wichita.

Contributions of the Catholic Church to the growth of western civilization.

the right to life,
personal safety and security
the right to earn a living and to own personal property
the right to speak our minds in public
the right to gather for worship, and to be protected by due process of law.
We believe education is not only for the privileged few, but for all.

Pagan Europe was a wild and dangerous place during the centuries of conversion to Christianity. In fact, it is upon the rock of the Catholic Church that the culture we take so for granted developed.

This was changed by deeply held Catholic beliefs about

God
Creation

the dignity of each and every human person gradually influenced ideas about the common good and the way people should be treated, what was valued and what was seen as a threat to the good of persons.
Western culture grew out of a deep sense of the duties and rights of persons made in the image and likeness of God and has developed forms of governance, education and a way of life that expresses these beliefs.

Christ present! The Christian announcement is that God became one of us and is present here, and gathers us together into one body, and through this unity, His presence is made perceivable. This is the heart of the Benedictine message of the earliest times…It is just that Benedictinism has emphasized the organic character, the organic implications of this: it means, for example, that even earthly reality has to be placed inside this body–this is the “liturgy”–and that human labor expresses this liturgy and spreads it out over the entire day. Then all of life becomes the life of the Body of Christ. At any rate, this is the example that you are called to give to the whole Christian community. The attraction you must be for the people who will come here is this, it has to be this. Therefore, it is no small matter!
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani

Holy Week at the Abbey
April 5-8, 2007
Holy Thursday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
7:30 PM Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
3:00 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion

Holy Saturday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Evening Prayer
8:30 PM Easter Vigil
P Easter Sunday
7:00 AM Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

Father most holy,
look upon the blood flowing from the Saviour's pierced side; look upon the blood shed by the many victims of hatred, of war, of terrorism, and in your mercy, grant that the course of world events may unfold according to your will, in justice and in peace, and that your Church may devote herself with quiet confidence to your service and to the liberation of mankind.
-Pope John Paul II, Good Friday, 2003

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Novena to St. Benedict

In Preparation for the
Solemnity of His Passing

The monks of the Abbey will be saying the following
Prayer for the next nine days at Vespers in
Preparation for the Feast of the Death
Of St. Benedict, March 21. We invite you
To join us in saying this novena.

Holy Father Benedict, / blessed by God in grace and in name. / While standing in prayer with your hands raised to Heaven, / you yielded your spirit into the hands of your Creator. /
Protect us as we approach this great Solemnity commemorating your holy death. / Intercede for us / that we may grow in holiness through a monastic way of life, / and pray that the Lord would lead many men to join us in our common search for Him. /
Fulfill your promise to defend us against the snares of the enemy, / now and in the last struggle of death, / as we daily remind you of your glorious departure and heavenly joys.
/ By your holy blessing, protect us this day and every day / that we may never be separated from our Blessed Lord, / from your co mpany / and the company of all the blessed. / We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

All School Mass

There will be a Benedictine College all-school Mass for the Solemnity of the Death of Saint Benedict (celebrated only by the Benedictine order.) The Mass will be in the Abbey Church on Wednesday, March 21 at 2:00 PM.

My revered Predecessor, St Gregory the Great, a Benedictine monk and celebrated biographer of St Benedict, invited us to discern the basis of a life wholly dedicated to "seeking and serving Christ, the one true Saviour" (Preface of the Mass of St Benedict), in the atmosphere of great faith in God and intense love for his law which motivated the original family of the saint from Norcia. This spiritual striving, which grew and developed as he faced the challenges of life, soon led the young man to forsake the illusions of worldly knowledge and possessions to devote himself to learning the wisdom of the Cross and to being conformed to Christ alone.
-Pope John Paul II

G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.

You are invited, on the Eve of the Feast of St. Benedict, to:
G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 7:30 PM
O'Malley McAllister Auditorium
Benedictine College, Atchison, KS.
Free. The public is welcome.

An evening featuring:

Dale Ahlquist The President and co-founder of the American Chesterton Society. He has written extensively on Chesterton for a number of publications and is a frequent speaker at schools, churches, and conferences. A Catholic convert, Dale has been a guest on "The Journey Home" and "Mother Angelica Live." He lives in Bloomington, Minnesota, with his wife and three children.

John "Chuck" Chalberg A history professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minnesota, who has staged one man shows of Chesterton all across the United States. He has also written and performed one-man shows of Teddy Roosevelt, H.L. Mencken and the colorful Brooklyn Dodgers owner, Branch Rickey. Chuck and his wife and three sons make their home in Bloomington.

No longer to believe in God does not mean to believe in nothing, but instead to believe in everything. This well-known insight of Chesterton well describes the condition of many people today. Having abandoned the Christian faith, and disappointed by the claims of Enlightenment reason, they find themselves defenseless before reality. They are unable to free themselves from the anguish of a radical loneliness when confronted with the world and with time. To-overcome this anguish they resort to magic, which would allow them to gain the protection of occult powers, and they do not refrain from seeking an alliance with these same powers of evil.
-Angelo Cardinal Scola, Archbishop of Venice.

Saint Benedict’s Day concert

Tom Booth, a nationally recognized and award-winning Christian musician, will give an intimate “coffee house” style concert at Benedictine College at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, 2007. His performance will take place in the Raven Roost, a relaxed, wood-paneled lounge in the Haverty Center on the Benedictine campus, in conjunction with the grand opening of a student-run coffee shop.
“This concert, in a small, friendly venue, should be quite a treat for Tom’s fans,” said Steve Johnson, marketing director for the college. “It should also bring in a great crowd to introduce the new student venture on campus, Holy Grounds Coffee House.”
Booth wrote his first song at the age of 13 in response to the death of a friend. He has written extensively for Christian performers like Kathy Troccoli and Amy Grant and has produced four albums himself. Three of his compositions, two performed by Troccoli and one by Grant, have gone to #1 on the Contemporary Christian Music chart. He has composed and performed for Mother Teresa and Pope John Paul II and has earned numerous Dove, Unity and Grammy awards and nominations for both solo projects and collaborations.
Tickets are $5 and will be on sale at the door. A special package price of $12 is also available for those interested in attending both the Booth concert and the annual Benedictine College Guitarfest, scheduled for Saturday, April 14, featuring Matt Maher. Guitarfest tickets are $10.

Holy Week at the Abbey
April 5-8, 2007

Holy Thursday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
7:30 PM Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
3:00 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion

Holy Saturday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Evening Prayer
8:30 PM Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday
7:00 AM Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

Father most holy,
look upon the blood flowing from the Saviour's pierced side;
look upon the blood shed by the many victims
of hatred, of war, of terrorism,
and in your mercy, grant that the course of world events
may unfold according to your will, in justice and in peace,
and that your Church may devote herself with quiet confidence
to your service and to the liberation of mankind.
-Pope John Paul II, Good Friday, 2003

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.

You are invited, on the Eve of the Feast of St. Benedict, to:
G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 7:30 PM
O'Malley McAllister Auditorium
Benedictine College, Atchison, KS.
Free. The public is welcome.

An evening featuring:

Dale Ahlquist The President and co-founder of the American Chesterton Society. He has written extensively on Chesterton for a number of publications and is a frequent speaker at schools, churches, and conferences. A Catholic convert, Dale has been a guest on "The Journey Home" and "Mother Angelica Live." He lives in Bloomington, Minnesota, with his wife and three children.

John "Chuck" Chalberg A history professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minnesota, who has staged one man shows of Chesterton all across the United States. He has also written and performed one-man shows of Teddy Roosevelt, H.L. Mencken and the colorful Brooklyn Dodgers owner, Branch Rickey. Chuck and his wife and three sons make their home in Bloomington.

Holy Week at the Abbey
April 5-8, 2007

Holy Thursday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
7:30 PM Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
3:00 PM Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion

Holy Saturday
6:20 AM Vigils and Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Evening Prayer
8:30 PM Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday
7:00 AM Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

In sacrificing himself for us all, Christ gave a new meaning to suffering, opening up a new dimension, a new order: the order of love.... The passion of Christ on the Cross gave a radically new meaning to suffering, transforming it from within....
It is this suffering which burns and consumes evil with the flame of love.... All human suffering, all pain, all infirmity contains within itself a promise of salvation;... evil is present in the world partly so as to awaken our love, our self-gift in generous and disinterested service to those visited by suffering.... Christ has redeemed the world: "By his wounds we are healed' (Is 53: 5)"
-Pope Benedict XVI

Wisdom of Monsignor Luigi Giussani
Founder of Communion and Liberation

It is the exceptionality with which the figure of Christ appears that makes it easy to recognize him. It corresponds—unexpectedly!—to the needs of your heart in a way you could never have imagined or predicted. The exceptional is, paradoxically, the appearance of what is most natural for us.

Within the man to whom Christ draws near and who freely desires and accepts the relationship with him…his nature as a man changes….In the life of the Church, Being, God, the Word made flesh, Christ communicates to man the gift of a more profound participation in the origin of everything. In this way, man remains man but becomes something more. Man within the Church, is offered a ’supernatural’ participation in Being.

Memorable Spring and Summer

A) Sunday, April 29th, 2007, 2:00 PM: Abbey Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the 150th anniversary year of the Abbey with a Mass of Dedication celebrated by Archbishop Joseph Naumann.

B) FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholuc University Students) training on the campus of Benedictine College from late May through early July. The FOCUS missionaries from around the United States will be here on our campus for their annual training.
C) General Chapter of the American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monasteries will be here in June. Abbots and Priors from Benedictine Abbeys and Priories, as well as one delegate from each house will be here this includes:

St. Vincent Archabbey, Pa
St. John’s Abbey, Mn
St. Benedict’s Abbey, Ks
St. Mary’s Abbey, NJ
Belmont Abbey, NC
St. Bernard Abbey, Al
St. Procopius Abbey, Il
St. Gregory’s Abbey, Ok
St. Leo Abbey, Fl
Assumption Abbey, ND
St. Bede Abbey, Il
St. Peter’s Abbey, Canada
St. Martin’s Abbey, Wa
St. Anselm Abbey, NH
St. Andrew Abbey, Oh
Mount Savior Priory, NY
Newark Abbey, NJ
Tepeyac Abbey, Mexico
San Antonio Abad, Puerto Rico
Mary Mother of the Church Abbey, Va.

D) The meeting of the leaders of Benedictine Universities from around the United States will be here in June.

E) Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day at the Abbey. Welcoming the Monks from our Priory in Mineiros, Brazil.

F) Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes,
Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding
monastery, will be principal celebrant of the 2:00 PM Mass.

G) Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities for the Abbey’s 150th anniversary.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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Representatives of Communion and Liberation to have audience with Benedict XVI

Rome, Feb 6, 2007 / 11:54 am (CNA).- Members of the movement Communion and Liberation will have an audience with Pope Benedict XVI in St. Peter’s Square on March 24 in order to mark the 25th anniversary of their Pontifical recognition.
The president of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, Father Julian Carron, has invited members to appropriately prepare to go to Rome as “a sign of simple and total adherence” to the person of the Pope, the steadfast guide without whom the Catholic faith would descend “into one of the many ideological variants that dominate the world.”
“The power of the Spirit, linked to his ministry, is the guarantee of the presence of Christ in history. With this in mind we should present ourselves to the Holy Father, with that childlike devotion that has been instilled in us,” he wrote in a letter to members of the movement.
Father Carron recalled that Benedict XVI “has had and continues to have a very singular relationship with our history for which we feel especially close to him. He knows us well, just as he knew Father Guissani (the founder of CL) well; we all had to chance to see him at his funeral” when he was still a Cardinal.
Father Carron expressed his hope that the Pontiff would “address to us words that will enlighten our path in this so very decisive moment of our history, of the history of the Church and of the world.”
In this sense, after recalling his audience with John Paul II, Father Carron invited all CL members to prepare themselves for “the encounter with Benedict XVI, praying to the Virgin Mary during your daily Angelus, and to Father Giussani for an attentive disposition to listen to him and follow him.”

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Contact us at news@catholicna.com

Great Book Choice:
Jesus of Israel
Finding Christ in the Old Testament
Authored by Father Richard Veras; Foreword by Father Peter John Cameron, O.P., editor of Magnificat magazine.

"Jesus did not come from nowhere! He was long awaited by a people who were educated…to expect God's presence in the messiness of their own history." —From the Introduction

Not only was Jesus a Jew, his coming was foreshadowed in stories from Genesis to the prophets. Father Richard Veras invites us to enter a more intimate relationship with Jesus Christ through the doors of familiar and not-so-familiar incidents in the Old Testament. Ever wonder, for example, why God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac? Even more, why Abraham was willing to do it? Puzzled as to why there are two creation accounts in Genesis? What's the problem with being a Samaritan? And what does any of this have to do with Jesus and our life in him?

The author explores these and other issues with one goal in mind: to "aid the reader to come to a deeper certainty about Jesus Christ."
This book makes the Word of God accessible to the young and, in fact, to anyone who wishes to look at the Bible with the eyes of a faith in touch with the grace of the Jewish people. The insights are quite valuable, but the real attractiveness of the book is the faith that it inspires through a simple, straightforward and imaginative reading of the Sacred Text. —Father Francis Martin, John Paul II Cultural Center, Washington, D.C.
ISBN-10: 0-86716-772-6 The author, Fr. Richard Veras, is part of Communion and Liberation. He spoke here on the campus of Benedictine College in June, 2005 on a panel discussing The Psalms, a book by Monsignor Luigi Giussani. Also on that panel were Dr. Kim Shankman, the Dean of Benedictine College, and Dr. Jim Madden, last year’s educator of the year at Benedictine College.

G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.

You are invited, on the Eve of the Feast of St. Benedict, to:
G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.
Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 7:30 PM
O'Malley McAllister Auditorium
Benedictine College, Atchison, KS.
Free. The public is welcome.

An evening featuring:

Dale Ahlquist The President and co-founder of the American Chesterton Society. He has written extensively on Chesterton for a number of publications and is a frequent speaker at schools, churches, and conferences. A Catholic convert, Dale has been a guest on "The Journey Home" and "Mother Angelica Live." He lives in Bloomington, Minnesota, with his wife and three children.

John "Chuck" Chalberg A history professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minnesota, who has staged one man shows of Chesterton all across the United States. He has also written and performed one-man shows of Teddy Roosevelt, H.L. Mencken and the colorful Brooklyn Dodgers owner, Branch Rickey. Chuck and his wife and three sons make their home in Bloomington.

Memorable Spring and Summer
A) Sunday, April 29th, 2007: Abbey Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the 150th anniversary year of the Abbey with a Mass of Dedication celebrated by Archbishop Joseph Naumann.

B) FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholuc University Students) training on the campus of Benedictine College from late May through early July. The FOCUS missionaries from around the United States will be here on our campus for their annual training.

C) General Chapter of the American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monasteries will be here in June. Abbots and Priors from Benedictine Abbeys and Priories, as well as one delegate from each house will be here this includes:

St. Vincent Archabbey, Pa
St. John’s Abbey, Mn
St. Benedict’s Abbey, Ks
St. Mary’s Abbey, NJ
Belmont Abbey, NC
St. Bernard Abbey, Al
St. Procopius Abbey, Il
St. Gregory’s Abbey, Ok
St. Leo Abbey, Fl
Assumption Abbey, ND
St. Bede Abbey, Il
St. Peter’s Abbey, Canada
St. Martin’s Abbey, Wa
St. Anselm Abbey, NH
St. Andrew Abbey, Oh
Mount Savior Priory, NY
Newark Abbey, NJ
Teeyac Abbey, Mexico
San Antonio Abad, Puerto Rico
Mary Mother of the Church Abbey, Va.

D) Meeting of the leaders of Benedictine Universities from around the United States will be here in June.

E) Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day at the Abbey. Welcoming the Monks from our Priory in Mineiros, Brazil.

F) Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes,
Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding
monastery, will be principal celebrant.

G) Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities for the Abbey’s 150th anniversary.

_________________________________________________________________________ "(Blessed) Mother Teresa replied, 'It is Jesus to whom we do everything; we love Jesus.' Cardinal Hamer rightly writes, 'In this way, a fact that happened two thousand years ago becomes- what a paradox-the most clamorous and interesting novelty in the life today of so many young people' -in the life today of so many young people, of Mother Teresa, or our life, our time, our age. Mother Teresa was not a youngster, but she was certainly young at heart."
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, From a talk at the Basilica of St. Anthony of Padua, Italy, February 11, 1994.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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Ut in Omnibus Glorificetur Deus

Movie Stars
Benedictine College student Jake Livingston and others were on an EWTN show with Dr. Ted Sri, a visiting professor here at Benedictine College. The show, Knowing Mary through the Bible, will air on EWTN the following times for the next 13 weeks. Tune in the following times to watch on the global Catholic television network, EWTN.

Friday at 5:00pm.
Tuesday at 10:00 am,
Thursday 1:00 am,

Vocation Retreat

Please remember in your prayers nine men who will be at the Abbey for the weekend for a vocation retreat. Our vocation director, Prior James Albers does a great job inviting men to experience the monastic life and discern whether the Lord may be calling them to this life.
He wrote a rule for his monks, both excellent for discretion and also eloquent for its style. If any be curious to know further of his life and conversation, he may understand all his manner of life and discipline in the institution of that rule for the holy man could not otherwise teach, than he himself had lived.
Pope St. Gregory the Great

Let them toil, as the Patriarch Benedict admonishes, with mind and soul elevated towards heaven, working not by force but through love; and a last word, even when they are defending their own legitimate rights, let them not be envious of the lot of others, labor not in disorder and tumult, but in tranquil and harmonious unity. Let them be mindful of those divine words "in the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread"; (Genesis 3, 19) this law of obedience and expiation holds good for all men.
Pope Pius XII

May every Benedictine community present itself with a well-defined identity, like a "city on a hill", distinct from the surrounding world, but open and welcoming to the poor, to pilgrims and to all who are searching for a life of greater fidelity to the Gospel!
-Pope John Paul II

Guests to the Campus

We welcome Archbishop Naumann to campus this Sunday. He will be celebrating the 6:30 PM Mass at the Parish, have a meeting for anyone interested at 8 PM in Ferrell Hall Lounge, and celebrate the 9:30 PM Mass in the St. Martin’s Memorial Hall Chapel.

Tuesday, March 20 at 7:30 PM, Presentation on G.K. Chesterton in the O’Malley-McAlister Auditorium.

On Wednesday, March 21 we will celebrate the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict. (A solemnity for our congregation of monks.) It was on July 11, 1980, the 1500th anniversary of the Birth of St. Benedict that Monsignor Luigi Giussani and the leaders of Communion and Liberation were welcomed by the Abbot of Monte Cassino and given official recognition as a movement associated with the Benedictines. The following quote is from Monsignor Luigi Giussani on the Benedictine order and the movement:

Christ present! The Christian announcement is that God became one of us and is present here, and gathers us together into one body, and through this unity, His presence is made perceivable. This is the heart of the Benedictine message of the earliest times. Well, this also defines the entire message of our Movement, and this is why we feel Benedictine history to be the history to which we are closest, without any comparison with the other paths. St Francis, too, is this; St Francis, too, emphasizes this (as do all the other Christian forms). It is just that Benedictinism has emphasized the organic character, the organic implications of this: it means, for example, that even earthly reality has to be placed inside this body–this is the “liturgy”–and that human labor expresses this liturgy and spreads it out over the entire day. Then all of life becomes the life of the Body of Christ. At any rate, this is the example that you are called to give to the whole Christian community. The attraction you must be for the people who will come here is this, it has to be this. Therefore, it is no small matter!
-Luigi Giussani to the Benedictine monks of the Cascinazza, Milan,

Febraury 12, 1982

Wisdom from Father Henry Lemke, OSB
Founder of St. Benedict’s Abbey.

One has been wont to put various interpretations and conjectures on this step in my life (the move to Kansas); in fact, they have gone so far as to suggest that my real intention was to drop out of my ministry entirely, or at least to give up my life in the Benedictine order. If this had really been the case, I certainly would not have made all my prior plans to rid myself of all my possessions; in fact, right down to my last penny. To the contrary, there was nothing else that brought me to this step other than my disgust for previous events, and, along with that, my fond hope that I might just possibly be able to do something there that would be within my frame of mind.

The Kansas territory had just become a state within the union and it had been opened to immigrants. As a result, people from all directions came streaming into this wonderful land. At this time in Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, there was in residence a Doctor Rodrigue, a well-trained physician of French origin. Back in the time when Gallitzin was still alive, Bishop Kenrick, friend of a family then living in Philadelphia, had recommended the young doctor and helped him become established there. He formed a practice in Ebensburg and in a very short time had developed a wide-spread clientele. This man was, above all, a dear, good, all-around well-versed individual. He was the only one of my acquaintances with whom I could carry on in a truly friendly manner, and we soon were bosom friends. One really needs to understand the condition of society in America in order to grasp what a wonderful thing it is when one meets a truly well-versed man; a man who lives a life of high ideals and intents, and not one like the general American rabble.

I remember one time sitting with the Archbishop of Vienna at a luncheon. The conversation turned to the mob riots of 1848. One of the people present that day turned to me and asked: “What is the situation there in America with the mobs?” I countered, “there is no such thing as a mob class in America. Haven’t you possibly read in the newspapers that the legislators are always rousting about in their chambers like drunken cobbler apprentices?”

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Timely Speaker This Evening, March 1st

Ravens Respect Life at Benedictine College is hosting a guest speaker:
Dr. John Morris of the philosophy department at Rockhurst University. He is speaking at 7:00 in O'Malley/McCallister Auditorium, this evening, March 1 . Tell your friends, pass on the word... He will be talking on stem cell research and and embryonic stem cell research. Why the controversy??????
His talk is entitled, "Stem Cell Research & Cloning in Kansas." He is a well known Catholic Pro-Life Speaker throughout the midwest and has been highly recommended by the Dioceses of Kansas City. Please come and enjoy the talk, as well has come prepared with any questions that he can answer for you.

Faced with so many opposing points of view, and a widespread rejection of sound doctrine concerning human life, we can feel that Paul's entreaty to Timothy is also addressed to us: "Preach the word, be urgent in season and out of season, convince, rebuke, and exhort, be unfailing in patience and in teaching" (2 Tim 4:2).
Pope John Paul II, Evangelium Vitae

Archbishop Joseph Naumann to Visit

This weekend Benedictine College will be blessed this coming Sunday, March 4, by a pastoral visit from Archbishop Joseph Naumann. Archbishop will celebrate the 6:30 PM Mass in the St. Benedict’s Parish Church, and the 9:30 PM Mass in the St. Martin’s Chapel. At 8 PM (between the two Masse) he will have a meeting with the college community in the Ferrell Hall Lounge. Thanks to President Steve Minnis for his good work in inviting Archbishop to be with us.

An evening of G.K. Chesterton
On March 20, 2007 Chuck Schalberg and Dale Alquist will be here at Benedictine College doing a performance/lecture on the life of G.K. Chesterton. This will be the eve of the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict (celebrated on March 21 by Benedictines) The performance will be on March 20 at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College.

Schalberg and Alquist have a show about Chesterton on EWTN on Sunday evenings. Mark your calendars and plan on attending!

Complaint always comes back in an echo from the ends of the world; but silence strengthens us. - G.K. Chesterton, The Father Brown Omnibus

To hurry through one's leisure is the most unbusiness-like of actions.
G.K. Chesterton, "A Somewhat Improbable Story." Tremendous Trifles
America is the only country ever founded on a creed. G.K. Chesterton, What I Saw In America, 1922

For those who have died

Monsignor Thomas Culhane of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas.
Josean Martinez, former Benedictine College student killed in a car wreck in Puerto Rico.
All those who have died in the war in Iraq.

Wisdom from Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete

We must place our hope not on cultural proposals but on the event of Christ, on something that has already happened. Evangelization is to give witness to the fact — to the verifiable fact — that this event can and does still happen today because it has happened to us as something unforeseen, something amazing that surprises us, something that is not the result of our efforts or our particular ethical and spiritual predispositions … because an event is something that touches the heart, that changes us, that gives us a new vision of life’s possibilities.

Great Book Idea

Jesus of Israel
Finding Christ in the Old Testament

Father Richard Veras; Foreword by Father Peter John Cameron, O.P., editor of Magnificat magazine
(You can order this book from Amazon, or good Catholic bookstores. Father Rich Veras and Father Cameron are both involved with Communion and Liberation. The author, Father Rich Veras was on a panel discussing the book of Psalms here at Benedictine College in June, 2005 along with our Dean Kim Shankman, and one of our philosophers, Dr. Jim Madden. I’ve heard great things about this book.)

"Jesus did not come from nowhere! He was long awaited by a people who were educated to expect God's presence in the messiness of their own history." —From the Introduction
Not only was Jesus a Jew, his coming was foreshadowed in stories from Genesis to the prophets.
Father Richard Veras invites us to enter a more intimate relationship with Jesus Christ through the doors of familiar and not-so-familiar incidents in the Old Testament.
Ever wonder, for example, why God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac? Even more, why Abraham was willing to do it? Puzzled as to why there are two creation accounts in Genesis? What's the problem with being a Samaritan? And what does any of this have to do with Jesus and our life in him? The author explores these and other issues with one goal in mind: to "aid the reader to come to a deeper certainty about Jesus Christ." "This book makes the Word of God accessible to the young and, in fact, to anyone who wishes to look at the Bible with the eyes of a faith in touch with the grace of the Jewish people. The insights are quite valuable, but the real attractiveness of the book is the faith that it inspires through a simple, straightforward and imaginative reading of the Sacred Text." —Father Francis Martin, John Paul II Cultural Center, Washington, D.C.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Great Book Idea

Jesus of Israel
Finding Christ in the Old Testament

Father Richard Veras; Foreword by Father Peter John Cameron, O.P., editor of Magnificat magazine

(You can order this book from Amazon, or good Catholic bookstores. Father Rich Veras and Father Cameron are both involved with Communion and Liberation. The author, Father Rich Veras was on a panel discussing the book of Psalms here at Benedictine College in June 95 along with our Dean Kim Shankman, and one of our philosophers, Dr. Jim Madden. I’ve heard great things about this book.)

"Jesus did not come from nowhere! He was long awaited by a people who were educated to expect God's presence in the messiness of their own history." —From the Introduction
Not only was Jesus a Jew, his coming was foreshadowed in stories from Genesis to the prophets. Father Richard Veras invites us to enter a more intimate relationship with Jesus Christ through the doors of familiar and not-so-familiar incidents in the Old Testament.
Ever wonder, for example, why God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac? Even more, why Abraham was willing to do it? Puzzled as to why there are two creation accounts in Genesis? What's the problem with being a Samaritan? And what does any of this have to do with Jesus and our life in him? The author explores these and other issues with one goal in mind: to "aid the reader to come to a deeper certainty about Jesus Christ." "This book makes the Word of God accessible to the young and, in fact, to anyone who wishes to look at the Bible with the eyes of a faith in touch with the grace of the Jewish people. The insights are quite valuable, but the real attractiveness of the book is the faith that it inspires through a simple, straightforward and imaginative reading of the Sacred Text." —Father Francis Martin, John Paul II Cultural Center, Washington, D.C.

Archbishop Naumann to visit this weekend

Thanks to President Minnis who has arranged a visit of Archbishop Naumann to campus this weekend. Archbishop will celebrate the 6:30 PM Mass at the parish Church, and the 9:30 PM Mass in the St. Martin’s Chapel in Memorial Hall. Archbishop will also meet with students and others at 8 PM in the Ferrell Hall Lounge. We welcome the chief shepherd of the Archdiocese to our campus!

TRACES

The Communion and Liberation magazine, Traces, did a story about Benedictine College and St. Benedict’s Abbey in the most recent edition. I’ve heard back from some readers from around the world who read about what is happening on the campus. This morning I received the following e-mail from Tim Hickey, Benedictine College graduate, and editor of Columbia the Knights of Columbus international magazine. Tim wrote:
Father Meinrad: Can't tell you how surprised and pleased I was to see the article on Benedictine and the interview with you in the No. 1 edition of "Traces." Congratulations and thanks for all your work at the college and abbey.

Timely Speaker This Thursday, March 1st

Ravens Respect Life at Benedictine College is hosting a guest speaker:
Dr. John Morris of the philosophy department at Rockhurst University. He is speaking at 7:00 in O'Malley/McCallister Auditorium, Thursday, March 1 . Tell your friends, pass on the word... He will be talking on stem cell research and and embryonic stem cell research. Why the controversy??????

His talk is entitled, "Stem Cell Research & Cloning in Kansas." He is a well known Catholic Pro-Life Speaker throughout the midwest and has been highly recommended by the Dioceses of Kansas City. Please come and enjoy the talk, as well has come prepared with any questions that he can answer for you.

Progress becomes true progress only if it serves the human person and if the human person grows: not only in terms of his or her technical power, but also in his or her moral awareness.
~Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, August 16, 2006

An evening of G.K. Chesterton

On March 20, 2007 Chuck Schalberg and Dale Alquist will be here at Benedictine College doing a performance/lecture on the life of G.K. Chesterton. This will be the eve of the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict (celebrated on March 21 by Benedictines) The performance will be on March 20 at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College.

Schalberg and Alquist have a show about Chesterton on EWTN on Sunday evenings. Mark your calendars and plan on attending!

The Declaration of Independence dogmatically bases all rights on the fact that God created all men equal; it is right [to do so].... There is no basis for democracy except in a dogma about the divine origin of man.
G.K. Chesterton

What embitters the world is not excess of criticism, but an absence of self-criticism.
G. K. Chesterton Sidelights on New London and Newer New York

A detective story generally describes six living men discussing how it is that a man is dead. A modern philosophic story generally describes six dead men discussing how any man can possibly be alive."
G.K. Chesterton A Miscellany of Men

Wisdom from Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete
Fr. Luigi Giussani points to this evidence in his discussion about Baptism, the sacrament through which we begin to participate in Christ's risen life. "The baptized person is different from the non-baptized." He or she has a different "I;" a new identity, one that allows a fulfillment of human desires that is simply otherwise totally impossible.

Fr. Giussani mentions two examples: the indissolubility of marriage, and virginity. Both reveal a love that is impossible if Christ had not risen from the dead. The "difference" between the baptized and non-baptized consists in a new "I" that is "so strong, so totally sustained by a divine force, that it is finally able to realize even that which, humanly speaking, the nature of the 'I' demands, but it is not capable of doing."

Forgiveness is an example; a love that forgives (cf, Una presenza che cambia) is evidence of Christ's Resurrection. That is why Baptism was first liturgically celebrated on Easter. If Christ had not risen from the dead, there could be no Baptism. The purpose of our companionship, our friendship, our Movement—Communion & Liberation—is the purpose of the Church, which is "to be the place where Baptism acts." That is why the victory of Christ is the Christian people. That is the evidence.

Pope to Meet Communion and Liberation

On March 24, 2007, at Noon, Pope Benedict XVI will meet with members of Communion and Liberation ( http://www.clonline.us/home.cfm ) in St. Peter’s Square to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Pontifical recognition of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation.

“Go into all the world" (Mt 28;19) is what Christ said to his disciples. And I repeat to you: "Go into all the world and bring the truth, the beauty, and the peace which are found in Christ the Redeemer". This invitation that Christ made to all his followers and which Peter has the duty ceaselessly to renew, is already interwoven with your history. In these thirty years you have been open to the most varied situations, casting the seed of the presence of your movement. I know that you have put down roots in eighteen nations in the world: in Europe, in Africa, in America, and I know also the insistency with which your presence is sought in other countries. Take on the burden of this ecclesial need: this is the charge I leave with you today.
-Pope John Paul II to Communion and Liberation, September 29, 1984

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



From the Heart

The second reading at Mass this past weekend from the 10th Chapter of St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans said if you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. At the Eucharistic Prayer, the very moment when we sacramentally celebrate the death of the Lord, we are called to lift up our hearts, and we respond that we lift them up to the Lord.

The other year in Traces, the Communion and Liberation magazine, Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete wrote the following

This is truly an amazing thing. The resurrection of Christ confirms the infallibility of the human heart as created, the infallibility of the desire for happiness that sustains our lives. Of course, particular desires often remain attached to a distorted image of reality and for this reason the desires of the heart have to be educated and purified in order to find the satisfaction for which we are made. It is Christ’s victory that purifies our particular desires and rescues the infallibility of the heart, thus affirming the positivity of reality.

This echoed what Monsignor Luigi Giussani had said in 2004

“Life is beautiful. It is a promise that God makes us with the victory of Christ.” There is a “great reward” in the depth of each reality that the victory of Christ affirms and protects. To witness to the resurrection of Christ is to remind each other of the fruit of this victory in the very being of reality, “sustaining the positivity that makes it reasonable to go on living,” whatever the circumstances.

A positive view of the human heart is nothing foreign to our monastic foundation. Our founder, Father Henry Peter Balthasar Lemke, OSB was moved to conversion by a man who championed the human heart. Bishop Johann Michael Sailer of Regensburg (Lemke joined the Roman Catholic Church in a ceremony performed by Bishop Sailer on April 21, 1824. He would come to Kansas in 1855 in a move that would lead to the foundation of our Abbey). Listen to what Pope Benedict (then young Father Joseph Ratzinger) said about Bishop Sailer, the spiritual director of the founder of St. Benedict’s Abbey:

Above all [Johann Michael Sailer] was a man who not only thought, but lived. If he was on the trail of a theology of the heart, that was not on account of cheap sentimentality, but because he knew about the wholeness of man, who fulfills the unity of his being as the interpenetration of spirit and body of the hidden springs of the mind and the clear vision of the intellect.

Antoine de Saint Exupery once said: "One can see properly only with the heart." If we compare the lifeless progressivism of Matthias Fingerlos with the richness and depth of Sailer the truth of this saying becomes strikingly obvious. Only with the heart can one see properly. Sailer was a visionary because he had a heart. He was able to give birth to something new, something that was big with the future, because he lived by what was enduring, and because he placed himself, his whole life, at its disposal.
-Father Joseph Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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Communion and Liberation

I forgot to mention the date in my earlier update. The CL day is this Sunday, February 25, at the St. Lawrence Center at KU. Everyone is welcome to attend!!! Bring something for the potluck lunch.
http://www.clonline.us/home.cfm

Yesterday, February 22, was the second anniversary of the death of Monsignor Luigi Giussani. To celebrate his life, and discuss what it means for us, everyone is invited to the following at the St. Lawrence Catholic Center at the University of Kansas, 1631 Crescent Road Lawrence, Kansas 66044 , this Sunday, February 25, 2007.

Mass at 11 AM at the St. Lawrence Center

Potluck dinner following Mass in the hall downstairs
Singing and assembly following dinner.

2. In addition we are excited that Pope Benedict has agreed to meet with members of Communion and Liberation at an audience in St. Peter’s Square on March 24, 2007 at Noon.

-Pope John Paul II. February 22, 2004 to members of Communion and Liberation The Movement (CL), therefore, has chosen and chooses to indicate not a road, but the road toward a solution to this existential drama. The road, as you have affirmed so many times, is Christ. He is the Way, the Truth, and the Life, who reaches the person in his day-to-day existence. The discovery of this road normally comes about through the mediation of other human beings. Marked through the gift of faith by the encounter with the Redeemer, believers are called to become an echo of the event of Christ, to become themselves an “event”.

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, Funeral of Monsignor Giussani

Fr Giussani always kept the eyes of his life and of his heart fixed on Christ. In this way, he understood that Christianity is not an intellectual system, a packet of dogmas, a moralism, Christianity is rather an encounter, a love story; it is an event.

Pope Benedict XVI, First Encyclical, Deus Caritas Est

Being Christian is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction.

Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete, in Traces, February 2006.

It is not enough to marvel at what happened at the moment of Christ’s miracles. We have to also look at the change in how those cured looked at life afterwards. When the paralytic woke up in the morning after the miracle, how did he perceive the day ahead of him? How about the man born blind when he saw his first sunrise the morning after the miracle? What about the widow of Nain? Lazarus? Or, for that matter, those for whom no physical healing occurred, such as Zacchaeus, the Samaritan woman, the woman caught in adultery, etc.? How did they look at life after their encounter with Jesus? The evidence of redemption is precisely this change in their relation with everything around them. Redemption brings about a change in awareness, a change in the way we see and judge life, in the way we live all the circumstances of our life. These circumstances may be exactly the same as they were before the encounter with Jesus, but now everything is changed, everything appears new. Can the change not be best described in terms of being now able to hear, to see, to walk, to talk, and to really live? Without this change in the “structure of our relation with the real” (Fr. Giussani’s words), what we have is indeed the “Church of Christ without Christ.”

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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And may Jesus Christ himself be always at his side. To this end, and after renouncing his former beliefs, I shall offer to him the Body and Blood of the Savior, and after the Mass, I shall bestow on him the sacrament of Confirmation. All of this will make for everyone of us the day of April 21, 1824, a most memorable one.
-Homily of Bishop Johann Michael Sailer on the occasion of Father Henry Lemke, the founder of our Abbey becoming a Roman Catholic, April 21, 1824 in the Cathedral of Regensburg.

Br. Anthony Vorwerk, OSB

Please continue to pray for Br. Anthony. He is in the Atchison Hospital. He has been in intensive care but they hope to move him soon. May the Lord bring him healing.

Friday Stations and Adoration

At 3 PM on Fridays we will have Stations of the Cross and Adoration in the St. Martin’s Chapel of Memorial Hall. This year we will be using the meditations by John Henry Cardinal Newman.

Son of a Great St. Benedict’s College professor

Tony Kovach, the son of the late Dr. Francis Kovach has an interesting website: ABCs of Faith. You can find it here at: http://www.abcsoffaith.com/html/newsandviews.html

Dr. Francis Kovach was born in 1918 in Budapest, Hungary, received his doctorate in philosophy from the Albert Magnus University in Cologne, Germany, and taught at St. Benedict’s College for a short time back in the 1960s. There are many stories of how he helped Jewish people during the dark days of the Second World War. In addition to being a great philosopher, Dr. Kovach was a good artist and musician and dedicated husband and father. Look at the site to see the good work his son Tony is doing.

Communion and Liberation

Yesterday, February 22, was the second anniversary of the death of Monsignor Luigi Giussani. To celebrate his life, and discuss what it means for us, everyone is invited to the following at the St. Lawrence Catholic Center at the University of Kansas, 1631 Crescent Road Lawrence, Kansas 66044

Mass at 11 AM

Potluck dinner following Mass in the hall downstairs
Singing and assembly following dinner.
2. In addition we are excited that Pope Benedict has agreed to meet with members of Communion and Liberation at an audience in St. Peter’s Square on March 24, 2007 at Noon.

Fellowship of Catholic University Students

In exciting news from FOCUS:

30 FOCUS student leaders from Benedictine College will be attending the regional leadership conference in Lincoln, Ne this weekend. They are expecting 200 leaders from this region to attend.

The national training for FOCUS will be here on the campus of Benedictine College this summer from May through early July.

The Mission of FOCUS is: To know Christ Jesus, and to fulfill His Great Commission, by first living and then communicating the fullness of life within the Family of God, the Church.

Timely Speaker Next Thursday, March 1st

Ravens Respect Life at Benedictine College is hosting a guest speaker:
Dr. John Morris of the philosophy department at Rockhurst University. He is speaking at 7:00 in O'Malley/McCallister Auditorium, Thursday, March 1 . Tell your friends, pass on the word... He will be talking on stem cell research and and embryonic stem cell research. Why the controversy??????

His talk is entitled, "Stem Cell Research & Cloning in Kansas." He is a well known Catholic Pro-Life Speaker throughout the midwest and has been highly recommended by the Dioceses of Kansas City. Please come and enjoy the talk, as well has come prepared with any questions that he can answer for you.

Progress becomes true progress only if it serves the human person and if the human person grows: not only in terms of his or her technical power, but also in his or her moral awareness.
~Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, August 16, 2006

Pope Benedict speaks on the Natural Law

Natural law is, definitively, the only valid bulwark against the arbitrary power or the deception of ideological manipulation. The knowledge of this law inscribed on the heart of man increases with the progress of the moral conscience.
The first duty for all, and particularly for those with public responsibility, must therefore be to promote the maturation of the moral conscience. This is the fundamental progress without which all other progress proves non-authentic.
The law inscribed in our nature is the true guarantee offered to everyone in order to be able to live in freedom and to be respected in their own dignity.
Pope Benedict XVI

G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.

You are invited, on the Eve of the Feast of St. Benedict, to:
G. K. CHESTERTON: THE APOSTLE OF COMMON SENSE.
Tuesday, March 20, 2007
O'Malley McAllister Auditorium
Benedictine College, Atchison, KS.

An evening featuring:

Dale Ahlquist The President and co-founder of the American Chesterton Society. He has written extensively on Chesterton for a number of publications and is a frequent speaker at schools, churches, and conferences. A Catholic convert, Dale has been a guest on "The Journey Home" and "Mother Angelica Live." He lives in Bloomington, Minnesota, with his wife and three children.

John "Chuck" Chalberg A history professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington,

Minnesota, who has staged one man shows of Chesterton all across the United States. He has also written and performed one-man shows of Teddy Roosevelt, H.L. Mencken and the colorful Brooklyn Dodgers owner, Branch Rickey. Chuck and his wife and three sons make their home in Bloomington.

Memorable Spring and Summer

A) Sunday, April 29th, 2007: Abbey Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the 150th anniversary year of the Abbey with a Mass of Dedication at 1:30 pm with Archbishop Joseph Naumann as celebrant.

B) FOCUS training on the campus of Benedictine College
C) General Chapter of the American Cassinese Congregation of Benedictine Monasteries
will be here in June. D) Meeting of the leaders of Benedictine Universities from around the United States will be here in June.
E) Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day at the Abbey. Welcoming the Monks from our Priory in Mineiros, Brazil.
F) Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes, Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding monastery, will be principal celebrant.
G) Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities for the Abbey’s 150th anniversary.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Timely Speaker

Next Thursday, March 1st, Ravens Respect Life at Benedictine College is hosting a guest speaker:
Dr. John Morris of the philosophy department at Rockhurst University. He is speaking at 7:00 in O'Malley/McCallister Auditorium . Tell your friends, pass on the word... He will be talking on stem cell research and and embryonic stem cell research. Why the controversy??????

His talk is entitled, "Stem Cell Research & Cloning in Kansas." He is a well known Catholic Pro-Life Speaker throughout the midwest and has been highly recommended by the Dioceses of Kansas City. Please come and enjoy the talk, as well has come prepared with any questions that he can answer for you.

Progress becomes true progress only if it serves the human person and if the human person grows: not only in terms of his or her technical power, but also in his or her moral awareness.
~Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, August 16, 2006

Pray for wisdom for a young pregnant mother

I received the following note from a student here at BC. Please add this girl to your prayer list.
Please add a girl named Sidney to your prayers and the prayers of your
fellow monks and sisters and all you can reach! She is scheduled for a
partial birth abortion tomorrow, and we are desperately asking for
everyones prayers that a miracle happens and she decides not to go
through with it. There is pressure from her mother to have the abortion.
She is 17 weeks along, and my sister and i went to highschool with her.
PLEASE spread the word if you can. Thank you so very much.

Before I formed you in the womb I knew you.
~ Jeremiah 1:5

For this reason, it is necessary to help all people to be aware that the intrinsic evil of the crime of abortion, which attacks human life at its beginning, is also an aggression against society itself,
~ Pope Benedict XVI

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



What they said One year ago on the First anniversary of the death of Monsignor Luigi Giussani (February 22, 2006)

Pope Benedict XVI

As I stressed during the funeral, dear Father Giussani was striking, above all for his steadfast faithfulness to Christ and for his unremitting effort in communicating the wealth of the Gospel message to every social category. His spiritual children have now the task of continuing to walk in his footsteps, following his teaching and remaining always in communion with the Bishops and other components of the Church. To this end I assure you of my prayers, asking the Lord that Communion and Liberation might serve the cause of the Gospel in joy, carrying on the work begun by its venerated founder.

Theodore Cardinal McCarrick, Archbishop of Washington, D.C.

Dear sisters and brothers, know that you must live that faith. Know that you must love that faith, know that you must never be afraid to proclaim that faith, and know that you must never, ever, be ashamed of that faith. This is the message that I want to give you on this great anniversary; this is the prayer that I have for you, that as you read and study and meditate on all the teachings of Don Luigi, into your lives may come that deepest faith that liberates, and that deepest faith that binds us together in communion. It is that deepest faith that we must share with others, so that from that faith may come the victory of the Lord–He who truly is the Christ, the Son of the Living God.

Christoph Cardinal Schonborn, O.P., Archbishop of Vienna

I believe that Fr. Giussani saved many, because he showed many the way of truth; a person like him covers a multitude of sins. Pope Benedict defines you as the spiritual sons of Fr. Giussani. I am 68 years old, and I lived personally the crisis of the 1968 generation; at that time, we would have been unable to agree with each other. We rejected paternity, authority, and discipleship, because we were convinced that these things were incompatible with true human dignity. We wanted to be brothers, and we forgot that it is impossible to be brothers and sisters without parents. Thank God, the Lord aroused in the Church people who showed us how we could be brothers and sisters only by having a father.

Camillo Cardinal Ruini, President, Italian Bishop’s Conference

But of one thing we are sure: in order to remain faithful to itself and to renew itself continually, the Movement of Communion and Liberation is called upon to draw over and over again from the source of the teaching and the witness of its founder. Fr. Giussani’s charism, read and lived in the great riverbed of the Church’ tradition, will be fruitful with missionary initiatives, speculative and theological studies, and charitable works. This will make it possible to write new pages of the Movement’s history, as the development and maturation of what he has initiated. Fr. Giussani’s teaching and example are like yeast that has certainly not exhausted its power, and it will go on bearing new fruits now after his death.

Archbishop Tadeusz Kondrusiewicz of Moscow

Along with John Paul II and Sr. Lucia, Fr. Giussani was an important sign for the Church and for the future of Christianity: even though he was born and was educated during the Fascist period in Italy, his figure is the proof that man’s freedom, his awareness of the truth, cannot be overcome by anything. And more, Giussani had a starting intuition, which later became fundamental in his charism, the charism of the Movement of GS and later Communion and Liberation: the intuition of how important the task of education is, the formation of a human person who will be truly himself, free and responsible.

Cardinal Dionigi Tettamanzi, Archbishop of Milan

In this sense, I invite everyone to thank the Lord for the gift He made to the Church in the person and the work of this Milanese priest, Fr. Luigi, for the gift, in Pope Benedict’s words, of “such a zealous priest, in love with man because he was in love with Christ.” We are together in wishing to thank the Holy Father for the friendship he had for Monsignor Giussani, for his personal participation in his funeral held in this Cathedral, and for his letter on this first anniversary. I feel the need to pray to the Lord for all of Fr. Giussani’s “spiritual children” so that they may take up with trust and courage, under the guidance of his successor, Fr. Carrón, “the task”–once again the Pope’s words–“of going on walking in his footsteps, following his teaching, and always remaining in communion with the bishops and other components of the Church.” The celebration ends, life goes on. May it go on for all in a greater and greater love for Christ and His Church, “so that the world may believe” (Jn 17:21).

Archbishop Jan Pawel Lenga of Karaganda (Kazakhstan)

Fr. Giussani who was born far from Kazakhstan, in Milan, brought the announcement of Christ through his priests, and made it possible to adhere to Him. And now there are no more borders, only grace.

Cardinal Carlo Caffarra of Bologna

Monsignor Giussani had the gift from the Holy Spirit of the particular charism of directing the look of those he met towards the Fact for which exists all that exists. “The Word was made flesh and set up His dwelling amongst us.” His charism was to direct people to look upon Him whom men pierced, so as to have life from Him. “Look towards Him and be radiant,” Fr. Giussani seemed to say to everyone who met him. “This is the Christian message: Beauty became flesh and experienced ‘in frail human frames/ learn with what ills our mortal life doth swarm,’” and “this is man’s natural cry that nature inspires, it is man’s cry, his prayer that God become a companion and an experience” (L. Giussani, Le mie letture, BUR, p. 30). Fr. Giussani’s educational genius lay in his capacity to make every person he met hear this cry that wells up in everyone’s heart: that God become a companion and an experience for him. […] Yes, dear friends, because the true question to which all cultural endeavor leads back is this: who does man live for? If we answer, “For himself,” the ultimate cultural horizon becomes a concept and an experience of deceptive autonomy which devastates the humanity of the poor and the lowly.

__________________________________________________ The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other.
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Communion and Liberation Day

The CL and CLU communities of Kansas and western Missouri will be having a CL day at the St. Lawrence Center at the University of Kansas on Sunday, February 25.

Begins with 11 AM Mass in the Center Chapel, 1631 Crescent Road Lawrence, Kansas 66044, celebrated by Father Steven Beseau, Director of the Center, and doctoral student in Moral Theology at the Angelicum. Father Meinrad Miller, OSB will be the homilist. The Mass will commemorate the second anniversary of the death of Monsignor Luigi Giussani, founder of the movement.

Following Mass we will have a potluck dinner in the hall below the student chapel.
Following the dinner we will have singing and an assembly.
All are welcome!!!

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Scholarship Ball

This coming Saturday is the 36th annual scholarship ball for Benedictine College at the Sheraton Overland Park Hotel. It’s amazing what President Steve Minnis, Vice-President Kelly Vowels, Dean Kim Shankman, and so many more are doing for the school. It is the support of people life you that helps the college and the Abbey continue to be a city on the hill proclaiming the truth of Jesus Christ, and His presence in our midst!

Years of Celebration

The next couple of years will mark significant milestones for the growth of faith in Christ here in Atchison.
In April, 2007 the monks will begin celebrating our 150th anniversary of the founding of the Abbey.
In September, 2007 we will celebrate the 5th anniversary of Communion and Liberation being present on campus.
In 2008 Benedictine College will celebrate its 150th anniversary
In 2008 the St. Benedict’s College Council of the Knights of Columbus will celebrate its 50th anniversary as a college council, among the first in the nation.
In 2008 FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholic University Students) will celebrate the 10th anniversary of beginning its very first program at Benedictine College.

This fiftieth year you shall make sacred by proclaiming liberty in the land for all its inhabitants. It shall be a jubilee for you, when every one of you shall return to his own property, every one to his own family estate.
-Leviticus 25, 10

For to me the Israelites belong as servants; they are servants of mine, because I brought them out of the land of Egypt, I, the LORD, your God.
-Leviticus 25, 55

May every Benedictine community present itself with a well-defined identity, like a "city on a hill", distinct from the surrounding world, but open and welcoming to the poor, to pilgrims and to all who are searching for a life of greater fidelity to the Gospel!
-Pope John Paul II, on the 1500th anniversary of Subiaco, Italy

Leadership, Benedictine style

Student leaders on campus who wish to be dorm R.A.s, Campus Ministers, Ambassadors, and other leaders go through a “leadership seminar.” Today many of them (Over 60) joined the monks at Vigils and Morning Prayer at 6:20 AM

Dear young people, you know that Christianity is not an opinion nor does it consist of empty words. Christianity is Christ! It is a Person, a Living Person! To meet Jesus, to love him and make him loved: this is the Christian vocation. Mary was given to you to help you enter into a more authentic and more personal relationship with Jesus. Through her example, Mary teaches you to gaze on him with love, for He has loved us first. Through her intercession, she forms in you a disciple's heart able to listen to her Son, who reveals the face of his Father and the true dignity of the human person.
Pope John Paul II, World Youth Day message, 2003

KCCSC

Again there will be a nice group of BC students going to the convention at the Capitol Plaza Hotel in Topeka this coming weekend. The theme this year is Whatever you did unto the least of my brothers, you did unto me. The host this year is the Didde Catholic Campus Center at Emporia State. Their chaplain Father Ray May, is a 1988 graduate in physics from Benedictine College.

An evening of G.K. Chesterton

On March 20, 2007 Chuck Schalberg and Dale Alquist will be here at Benedictine College doing a performance/lecture on the life of G.K. Chesterton. This will be the eve of the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict (celebrated on March 21 by Benedictines) The performance will be on March 20 at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College.

Schalberg and Alquist have a show about Chesterton on EWTN on Sunday evenings. Mark your calendars and plan on attending!

Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.
G.K. Chesterton

Sisters Servants of Mary, Kansas City, Ks.
The following note was sent especially to homeschool families, but would probably apply to others. Sr. Catherine in the Sisters Servants of Mary was a music major here at Benedictine College back in the mid 1990s. Pray for them and the great work they do with people who are sick, not to mention the powerful witness they give to Christ’s Mercy in our world through Mary.

What: Vocation Retreat
Who: Girls 7 to 10 years of age
When: March 09, 2007 from 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Where: Sisters, Servants of Mary
800 North 18th Street
Kansas City, Kansas 66102
(913)371-3423 or vocservantsmkc@yahoo.com

Please send in the following information to the above address
or e-mail. Please contact Sr. Eliut Vega vocservantsmkc@yahoo.com or leave a message
Name________________________ Age_____
Address__________________________________
________________________________________
Telephone_________________________________
E-mail____________________________________
Parents consent signatures:

________________________________________
________________________________________
If there is anything, we must know about your child=s health
for this event please enclose the information.
Food Allergies ______________________________

Indicate if willing to serve as adult helper

Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist
http://www.sistersofmary.org/
I will be helping the Sisters with the May 26-27 vocations retreat in Ann Arbor, Michigan. There are also some other dates coming up. On the webpage they give a brief and simple explanation of their apostolate: Our apostolate, as spiritual mothers, is the preaching and teaching of Truth.

* May 26-27, 2007
* November 3-4, 2007
* December 1-2, 2008* Women's Retreat
* February 23-24, 2008
* May 24-25, 2008
Times: 2:00 PM on Saturday to 3:00 PM on Sunday.

For more information about the retreats see the contact information below.

Due to space limitations, your registration will be secured when we receive the $25.00 registration fee.

Location:
Spiritus Sanctus Academy - Ann Arbor
4101 Joy Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 996-3855

Contact: Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz, O.P.
Vocations Director
734.994.7437
sjab@sistersofmary.org

___________________________________________________ The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other.
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Heritage Night III: Raven Athletics
The BC Student Ambassadors invite you to the next Heritage
Night. It is called Heritage Night III: Raven Athletics. It will be at 6:00 in St. Augustine Lounge this Thursday (tomorrow) February 15th. Panelists are

Fr. Hugh Keefer, OSB, Chaplain to the men’s basketball team.
Coach Wilcox, Head Football coach
Darryl Jones. Alumn, NAIA Hall of Fame
The M.C. will be BC Junior, Shane Rapp. The theme is Raven Athletics. Pizza from Gambino's will be served.

The first two heritage nights were truly memorable experiences. In the first evening, Dean Elmer Fangman, Dr. and Mrs. George Baumgartner, and Dr. Lee Gomez discussed the heritage of the college. In the second evening, Dr. John Settich talked with Keith Jaloma, Sr. Mary Irene, and Abbot Owen about our Benedictine roots. This evening will prove to be another wonderful opportunity to connect with our heritage!!!

KCCSC

I still remember the many long hours Br. Jeremy and the students of Benedictine College put into hosting the Kansas Catholic College Students Convention last year. Again there will be a nice group of BC students going to the convention at the Capitol Plaza Hotel in Topeka this coming weekend. The theme this year is Whatever you did unto the least of my brothers, you did unto me. The host this year is the Didde Catholic Campus Center at Emporia State. Their chaplain Father Ray May, is a 1988 graduate in physics from Benedictine College.

Speaking of Priest graduates

Last evening the monks held a very good community discussion about promoting vocations. The Second Vatican Council was clear about the need for us to always be fostering vocations. Father Matthew Habiger was the leader of the discussion. In his opening remarks, he reminded us that our college, in the first hundred years had educated 895 men for the priesthood, Eight of whom had become Bishops, and seven Abbots (this is only up until 1957, nearly 50 years ago). That number continues to grow as young men from the college consider the priesthood, and young men and women discern vocations to consecrated life.
My heartfelt wish is that prayer for vocations be intensified ever more; prayer that is adoration of the mystery of God and thanksgiving for the "great things" that he has accomplished and does not cease to carry out, despite human weakness. Contemplative prayer is pervaded with wonder and gratitude for the gift of vocations.
-Pope John Paul II

In order to respond to the call of God and start on our journey, it is not necessary to be already perfect. We know that the prodigal son’s awareness of his own sin allowed him to set out on his return journey and thus feel the joy of reconciliation with the Father. Weaknesses and human limitations do not present an obstacle, as long as they help make us more aware of the fact that we are in need of the redeeming grace of Christ.
-Pope Benedict XVI

If you, or a man you know, has thought about a vocation to the monastic life here at St. Benedict’s Abbey, contact our vocation director, Prior James Albers, OSB, for more information at jalbers@kansasmonks.org

Communion and Liberation

February 22 is the second anniversary of the death of our founder, Monsignor Luigi Giussani. There will be a special gathering of people from CL at the University of Kansas St. Lawrence Center that next Sunday, February 25, where will have a Mass to remember Don Giussani, and discuss our lives together now.

Students at Benedictine College in CL have been meeting on Thursday evenings at 6:30 PM in the Haverty Center Roost for School of Community. They have also been chanting Morning Prayer at 7:30 AM in the Ferrell Hall Lounge, and Evening Prayer at 10:45 PM in the St. Martin’s Chapel of Memorial Hall.

The faith is not given us in order that we preserve it, but in order that we communicate it. If we don't have the passion to communicate it, we don't preserve it.
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, Written contribution to the XXI plenary assembly of the Pontifical Council for the Laity, 2004

Scholarship Ball

This coming Saturday is the 36th annual scholarship ball for Benedictine College at the Sheraton Overland Park Hotel. It’s amazing what President Steve Minnis, and Vice-President Kelly Vowels are doing for the school. It is the support of so many people life you that help the college and the Abbey continue to be a city on the hill proclaiming the truth of Jesus Christ, and His presence in our midst!

An evening of G.K. Chesterton

On March 20, 2007 Chuck Schalberg and Dale Alquist will be here at Benedictine College doing a performance/lecture on the life of G.K. Chesterton. This will be the eve of the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict (celebrated on March 21 by Benedictines) The performance will be on March 20 at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College.

Schalberg and Alquist have a show about Chesterton on EWTN on Sunday evenings. Mark your calendars and plan on attending!

July in Wichita

I will be giving two talks on St. Benedict at the 2007 Summer Theology Institute for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Wichita. The theme of the 9th annual institute will be "How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization," a welcome and enlightening reminder of the role Catholics have played throughout the ages. The Institute is set for July 19-21, 2007 at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita with author and noted speaker Dr. Thomas Woods of the Ludwig von Mises Institute at Auburn University featured as main presenter and keynote speaker. My talks during these days will be on the role of St. Benedict in Europe, and the 150 years of the Benedictines in Kansas.

Dr. Woods is a senior fellow in history at the Mises Institute, holds a bachelor's degree in history from Harvard and his master's, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University. His books include the New York Times bestseller The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History (Regnery), How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization (Regnery),The Church and the Market: A Catholic Defense of the Free Economy (Lexington), and The Church Confronts Modernity: Catholic Intellectuals and the Progressive Era (Columbia University Press). He is also the editor of The Political Writings of Rufus Choate and of a 2003 edition of Orestes Brownson's 1875 classic The American Republic.

Sisters Servants of Mary, Kansas City, Ks.
The following note was sent especially to homeschool families, but would probably apply to others. Sr. Catherine in the Sisters Servants of Mary was a music major here at Benedictine College back in the mid 1990s. Pray for them and the great work they do with people who are sick, not to mention the powerful witness they give to Christ’s Mercy in our world through Mary.

What: Vocation Retreat
Who: Girls 7 to 10 years of age
When: March 09, 2007 from 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Where: Sisters, Servants of Mary
800 North 18th Street
Kansas City, Kansas 66102
(913)371-3423 or vocservantsmkc@yahoo.com
Please send in the following information to the above address
or e-mail. Please contact Sr. Eliut Vega vocservantsmkc@yahoo.com or leave a message
Name________________________ Age_____
Address__________________________________
________________________________________
Telephone_________________________________
E-mail____________________________________
Parents consent signatures:
________________________________________
________________________________________
If there is anything, we must know about your child=s health
for this event please enclose the information.
Food Allergies ______________________________
Indicate if willing to serve as adult helper

Dominican Sisters of Mary Mother of the Eucharist

http://www.sistersofmary.org/

I will be helping the Sisters with the May 26-27 vocations retreat in Ann Arbor, Michigan. There are also some other dates coming up. On the webpage they give a brief and simple explanation of their apostolate: Our apostolate, as spiritual mothers, is the preaching and teaching of Truth.

* May 26-27, 2007
* November 3-4, 2007
* December 1-2, 2008* Women's Retreat
* February 23-24, 2008
* May 24-25, 2008
Times: 2:00 PM on Saturday to 3:00 PM on Sunday.

For more information about the retreats see the contact information below.
Due to space limitations, your registration will be secured when we receive the $25.00 registration fee.

Location:
Spiritus Sanctus Academy - Ann Arbor
4101 Joy Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 996-3855
Contact: Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz, O.P.
Vocations Director
734.994.7437
sjab@sistersofmary.org

__________________________________________________ (Blessed) Mother Teresa replied, 'It is Jesus to whom we do everything; we love Jesus.' Cardinal Hamer rightly writes, 'In this way, a fact that happened two thousand years ago becomes- what a paradox-the most clamorous and interesting novelty in the life today of so many young people' -in the life today of so many young people, of Mother Teresa, or our life, our time, our age. Mother Teresa was not a youngster, but she was certainly young at heart.
-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, From a talk at the Basilica of St. Anthony of Padua, Italy, February 11, 1994.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Franciscan University of Steubenville to host: A City on a Hill - The Purpose and Identity of Catholic Higher Education

A City on a Hill - The Purpose and Identity of Catholic Higher Education
For nearly a thousand years, Catholic universities have been at the intellectual center of the Western world, producing the ideas and thinkers that shape the paths of history. The unique challenges and opportunities of the last century, however, have changed the way many Catholic institutions of higher learning understand their mission and identity. Today, there are almost as many different visions of Catholic higher education as there are Catholic colleges and universities. Both competing and complementary, these different visions raise a host of questions for Catholic educators and administrators, including

What is the purpose of Catholic higher education?
What is the proper relationship between the Catholic university and the Catholic Church?
What distinguishes a Catholic university from its secular counterparts?
What is the Catholic university’s responsibility to the culture at large?
Is there a common thread that should run through the missions of all Catholic universities?

From April 19-22, 2007, presidents, senior administrators, and key faculty members from a broad spectrum of Catholic colleges and universities will gather to discuss these pressing questions. Hosted by Franciscan University of Steubenville, the four-day symposium is meant to be an opportunity for open dialogue, a chance for those involved in Catholic higher education to share their understanding of their mission, assess the potential impact of Catholic colleges and universities on today’s world, and reflect upon the tradition and future of the Catholic intellectual tradition.

In addition to a series of paper presentations and panel discussions, the conference will feature four keynote addresses by internationally recognized leaders in Catholic higher education, including the inaugural Henkels Lecture, delivered by Archbishop J. Michael Miller, CSB, Secretary of the Congregation for Catholic Education at the Vatican.

Archbishop J. Michael Miller, CSB, is secretary of the Congregation for Catholic Education at the Vatican. Prior to his appointment, he served as president of the University of St. Thomas in Houston, Texas, where he taught theology for more than 10 years, and where he also served as chair of the Theology Department and as the school’s vice president for Academic Affairs. Ordained to the priesthood in 1979, Archbishop Miller studied at the Gregorian University in Rome where he completed studies for his licentiate and doctorate in theology. A prolific writer, Archbishop Miller has published seven books and more than 80 articles.

The Honorable Mario Mauro is the vice president of the European Parliament, where he has served since 1999. From 1999 to 2004, Mr. Mauro also served as vice president of the ACP-EU Joint Parliamentary Assembly and as vice chairman of the Committee on Culture. A native of Italy, Mr. Mauro previously served the Italian government as the director of schools and universities. He holds a degree in philosophy and is the author of numerous essays on educational systems.

Father Michael J. Garanzini, SJ, is president of Loyola University Chicago. Before becoming president of Loyola in 2001, Fr. Garanzini served as special assistant to the president and professor of psychology at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He also served as a visiting professor at Fordham University and as an associate professor of counseling and family therapy at St. Louis University, where he later served as academic vice president.
Fr. Garanzini holds his doctorate in psychology and religion from the Jesuit School of Theology at University of California, Berkeley.

Father John Jenkins, CSC, is president of the University of Notre Dame. Prior to his election in 2004, he also served on the University’s Board of Trustees and as the school’s vice president and associate provost. A former associate professor of philosophy, Father Jenkins has been a member of the Notre Dame faculty since 1990. He earned two degrees in philosophy from Oxford University and specializes in the areas of ancient philosophy, medieval philosophy, and the philosophy of religion. He also holds his master of divinity degree and licentiate in sacred theology from the Jesuit School of Theology at University of California, Berkeley.

To Register or For More Information
Call: 800-437-8368
Online: www.franciscanconferences.com

Registration Costs
Conference: $495/per person (including meals),
if postmarked by March 8, 2007
$550 (including meals) after March 8, 2007

Housing
Holiday Inn (recommended): 740-282-0901
Call for special rates.
Hampton Inn: 740-282-9800
Super 8: 740-282-4565
Holiday Inn (Weirton): 304-723-5522

Our Lady of Lourdes: Younger than Sin.

Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete
(With yesterday’s Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes, I remembered the following passage from an article by Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete.) Only the one who is "like this child" can recognize grace. That is why the one younger than sin was the same one who is full of grace.
When Pope John Paul II visited Lourdes in 1983, he recalled Bernanos's reference to the Blessed Virgin Mary as "younger than sin."[1] The expression points to the Immaculate Conception of Mary; Lourdes was where Mary identified herself as "the Immaculate Conception."

Bernanos's explanation is found in The Diary of a Country Priest.[2] Bernanos speaks through M. le Cure de Torcy:
She is our Mother, the mother of all flesh, a new Eve. But she is also our daughter. The ancient world of sorrow, the world before the access of grace, cradled her to its very heart for many centuries, dimly awaiting a virgo genetrix. For centuries and centuries those ancient hands, so full of sin, cherished the wondrous girl-child whose name even was unknown. A little girl, the queen of the angels! And she's still a little girl, remember! . . . The simplicity of God, that terrible simplicity which damned the pride of the angels. Our Lady knew neither triumph nor miracle. Her Son preserved her from the least tip-touch of the savage wing of human glory. No one has ever lived, suffered, died in such simplicity, in such deep ignorance of her own dignity.... For she was born without sin—in what amazing isolation! A pool so clear, so pure, that even her own image—created only for the sacred joy of the Father—was not to be reflected. The Virgin was Innocence ....The eyes of Our Lady are the only real child-eyes that have ever been raised to our shame and sorrow . . . they are not indulgent for there is no indulgence without something of bitter experience—they are eyes of gentle pity, wondering sadness, and with something more in them, never yet known or expressed, something that makes her younger than sin [emphasis added], younger than the race from which she sprang, and though a Mother by grace, mother of all graces, our little youngest sister.

Mary belongs to the original state of human existence. I use the term "original state" as does John Paul II in his "Wednesday Catechesis on Human Love."[3] It designates the state of the human person as intended by the Creator, before the fall. "Original" is understood in an existential state, not according to linear historical time. It is a matter of archetypal experiences which we can "reconstruct" from the accounts in the Book of Genesis of the state before the fall (CHL, 12/12/79). These experiences are revealing of what a human person is in God's plan of creation. In spite of sin, they remain within us as a "distant echo" of what we are meant to be. Although born into a world enslaved to sin, Mary lived in the original state of human existence.[4] Her spiritual life was entirely filled with God's Spirit.

According to the teaching of the Church, the original state was one of "innocence," the innocence of humankind's childhood or youth. The present or historical condition of human existence is the fruit of what happened "later," that is, sin separated man from his child-like innocence. Mary is thus "younger than sin." Using these terms, redemption must be seen as the retrieval of childhood innocence. It is only those who "become like children [who can] enter the kingdom of heaven" (Mt 18:3). Only those who retrieve and sustain (by the power of grace) those experiences of "original innocence" can enter the kingdom. When asked about divorce, Jesus said that it was incompatible with "the beginning" of the human race, with the state of original innocence (Mk 10:6). It had been permitted by Moses because of the human "hardness of heart." His redeeming mission, however, would offer to man a new heart, one free from enslavement to sin, a youthful heart. In this article we shall examine what this youthful heart is like, guided by the study of original innocence by Pope John Paul II in his Wednesday Catechesis.
This article was taken from the Winter 1995 issue of "Communio: International Catholic Review". To subscribe write Communio, P.O. Box 4557, Washington, D.C. 20017

Electronic Copyright © 1999 EWTN
All Rights Reserved

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other." -Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



New Development Director for the Monks
Abbot Barnabas is very pleased to announce that Dan Madden is the new Development Director for St. Benedict’s Abbey as of January 22, 2007. He worked for the monks of Conception Abbey for more than seven years. Look for a complete story in the March issue of Kansas Monks.

Busy Weekend for the college
Benedictine College is expecting 132 high school students to interview for Presidential scholarships this weekend. It is great to see all the activities that spring up around campus with an event like this: Raven Worship this evening at 9 PM in the Abbey Crypt, and a coffee house/music night tomorrow evening in the Ferrell Hall Lounge from 8-11 PM.

Eucharistic Adoration

We are blessed with many opportunities for daily Mass and Eucharistic Adoration here in Atchison. The times of Adoration are as follows:
24 hours a day/ 7 days a week: St. Benedict’s Parish Church
Wednesday and Thursday, 12:30-9:30 PM, St. Martin’s Chapel, Benedictine College
Saturday, 8-9 PM Eucharistic Holy Hour, Abbey Church

Pope Benedict to Experience Benedictine Hospitality

Abbot Barnabas stayed at this Abbey on his trip to our mission in Brazil in January. He said the monks were busy preparing for the arrival of the Holy Father. SĂO PAULO, Brazil, FEB. 8, 2007 (Zenit.org).- On his apostolic journey to Brazil in May, Benedict XVI will stay in a Benedictine monastery during his days in Săo Paulo.
According to the archdiocesan weekly O Săo Paulo, the Holy Father normally stays in either the apostolic nunciature of the host country, or in the archbishop's palace.
Săo Paulo, however, doesn't have an apostolic nunciature, and due to the impossibility of accommodating the Pope in the archbishop's palace, the then archbishop of Săo Paulo, Cardinal Cláudio Hummes requested Abbot Matthias Tolentino Braga of the Benedictine monastery to receive the Pope.
From May 9-11, the Pontiff will reside in the Abbey of Our Lady of the Assumption, which is being adapted to offer him a space of 38 square meters (409 square feet), divided into three rooms.
The abbey will also house the papal entourage, consisting of at least a dozen advisers.
Benedict XVI will have a private office with Internet connection, a small room for meetings, and his bedroom. All the rooms will be decorated with sacred art belonging to the monastery.
One of the monks' rooms will be transformed into a refectory to facilitate meal times for the papal entourage. The cloister will enlarge its gardens so that the Holy Father can go for walks, explained the abbot to Săo Paulo's archdiocesan weekly.
The monks are also aware of the Pontiff's love of music and will put a piano at his disposition in a room opposite his bedroom.
From the window of that room the Pope will also be able to greet the faithful should the opportunity arise.
From Săo Paulo, Benedict XVI will go to the city of Aparecida, where he will stay until May 13, to open the 5th General Conference of the Episcopate of Latin America and the Caribbean.

150th anniversary of the Abbey

Sunday, April 29th, 2007: Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the anniversary year Mass of Dedication at 2:00 pm (Note, I had the wrong time on an earlier e-mail) with Archbishop Joseph Naumann as celebrant in the Abbey Church. Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day. Welcoming the Monks from St. Joseph’s Priory, our monks in Mineiros, Brazil. Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes, Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding monastery, will be principal celebrant.

Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities.

Words of Wisdom from Father Henry Peter Lemke, OSB, our founder.
. It was Clemens Brentano who finally gave my calling its proper direction. Clemens had often visited at the estate, because he and Schlosser (Goethe’s nephew) had been schoolmates and had played together.
Besides that, I had often seen Brentano in Frankfurt. Here, he and I would get together and spend hours at a time near a big chest in which he kept many treasured things left by Catarina Emmerich. (the mystic Anne-Catherine Emmerich whose works mentioned here inspired Mel Gibson to do “The Passion of the Christ.” ) He would read to me many of her compositions. At that time, none of her writings had yet been published, but her “Bitter Sorrows and Death” was handed to me as I was leaving, so that I might take it with me to America.
This, I felt, was how Brentano directed me. He had, as it were, given the child a name; and that was ‘an American’. In the Fall of 1833, actually at grape harvest time, he had joined us, along with Raess, who at the time was the Seminary Director (at the time of this writing, he was Bishop of Strassburg), and Weis from Speyer, along with other like-minded men.
While we were all out on a walk into the vineyards, Raess shared with us a letter he had received from the new Bishop of Philadelphia (Kenrick). In this letter, he complained about the dearth of priests in his diocese, most especially German priests. He wrote that, in his vast diocese -- which at the time of this writing has been divided into seven dioceses -- he had only four or five German priests.
“Hey, my dear sir,” said Brentano, as he directed his attention to me, wearing the look of a jokester on his face, “that would be just the thing for you. You are a versatile young man, well-formed in both body and soul, squatting down there as a priest of luxury and getting big and fat while hundreds of poor Catholics are crying for spiritual direction.” (This is the famous line quoted in our Father Peter Beckman’s Kansas Monks.)One usually would take this as one of Brentano’s expressions of humor, but I didn’t take it that way. The idea of a priest of luxury no longer appealed to me. Brentano had, in his own inimitable way, said what I had often felt expressed deep in my own heart. It was thus that for a third time, I needed to make a decision, something that I had done twice before

Sisters Servants of Mary, Kansas City, Ks.

The following note was sent especially to homeschool families, but would probably apply to others. Sr. Catherine in the Sisters Servants of Mary was a music major here at Benedictine College back in the mid 1990s. Pray for them and the great work they do with people who are sick, not to mention the powerful witness they give to Christ’s Mercy in our world through Mary.

What: Vocation Retreat
Who: Girls 7 to 10 years of age
When: March 09, 2007 from 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Where: Sisters, Servants of Mary
800 North 18th Street
Kansas City, Kansas 66102
(913)371-3423 or vocservantsmkc@yahoo.com

Please send in the following information to the above address
or e-mail. Please contact Sr. Eliut Vega vocservantsmkc@yahoo.com or leave a message

Name________________________ Age_____
Address__________________________________
________________________________________
Telephone_________________________________
E-mail____________________________________
Parents consent signatures:

________________________________________
________________________________________

If there is anything, we must know about your child=s health
for this event please enclose the information.
Food Allergies ______________________________

Indicate if willing to serve as adult helper

An evening of G.K. Chesterton

On March 20, 2007 Chuck Schalberg and Dale Alquist will be here at Benedictine College doing a performance/lecture on the life of G.K. Chesterton. This will be the eve of the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict (celebrated on March 21 by Benedictines) The performance will be on March 20 at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College.

Schalberg and Alquist have a show about Chesterton on EWTN on Sunday evenings. Mark your calendars and plan on attending!

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++

Prayer Requests



For Carolyn Kurtz, long time secretary here at the college. Carolyn is in the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City in critical condition with a bacterial infection that has spread through the body.

For Allen Holthaus, father of BC student Mary Holthaus. Allen went to the hospital today in Topeka. We pray that the Lord would give him healing at this time.

For the monks of the Abbey as we prepare to celebrate our 150th anniversary of being founded. In thanksgiving for the blessing of God these 150 years, and that he might continue to bless us as we follow Him today.

150th anniversary of the Abbey

Sunday, April 29th, 2007: Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the anniversary year Mass of Dedication at 1:30 pm with Archbishop Joseph Naumann as celebrant in the Abbey Church.
Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day. Welcoming the Monks from St. Joseph’s Priory, our monks in Mineiros, Brazil.
Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes, Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding monastery, will be principal celebrant.

Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities.
Words of wisdom from our founder, Father Henry Peter Lemke, O.S.B.
Our Savior spoke words that carry the same message: “Feed my lambs.” These words weren’t for the Roman emperor, or Herod, or Pilate. He speaks these words even to the present day, but He does not speak to the all-powerful Kaiser of Germany, or to Queen Victoria, or to the reigning president of the United States. No, Christ spoke these words to Peter, and He speaks them still through the one who is the successor of Peter, and who cannot err. It is the Pope who is our true schoolmaster. And we Catholics, if we truly want to be Catholic and remain such, we dare not entrust our lambs to any other guidance.

Representatives of Communion and Liberation to have audience with Benedict XVI

Rome, Feb 6, 2007 / 11:54 am (CNA).- Members of the movement Communion and Liberation will have an audience with Pope Benedict XVI in St. Peter’s Square on March 24 in order to mark the 25th anniversary of their Pontifical recognition.

The president of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, Father Julian Carron, has invited members to appropriately prepare to go to Rome as “a sign of simple and total adherence” to the person of the Pope, the steadfast guide without whom the Catholic faith would descend “into one of the many ideological variants that dominate the world.”

“The power of the Spirit, linked to his ministry, is the guarantee of the presence of Christ in history. With this in mind we should present ourselves to the Holy Father, with that childlike devotion that has been instilled in us,” he wrote in a letter to members of the movement.

Father Carron recalled that Benedict XVI “has had and continues to have a very singular relationship with our history for which we feel especially close to him. He knows us well, just as he knew Father Guissani (the founder of CL) well; we all had a chance to see him at his funeral” when he was still a Cardinal.

Father Carron expressed his hope that the Pontiff would “address to us words that will enlighten our path in this so very decisive moment of our history, of the history of the Church and of the world.”

In this sense, after recalling his audience with John Paul II, Father Carron invited all CL members to prepare themselves for “the encounter with Benedict XVI, praying to the Virgin Mary during your daily Angelus, and to Father Giussani for an attentive disposition to listen to him and follow him.”

_________________________________________________________________________ "(Blessed) Mother Teresa replied, 'It is Jesus to whom we do everything; we love Jesus.' Cardinal Hamer rightly writes, 'In this way, a fact that happened two thousand years ago becomes- what a paradox-the most clamorous and interesting novelty in the life today of so many young people' -in the life today of so many young people, of Mother Teresa, or our life, our time, our age. Mother Teresa was not a youngster, but she was certainly young at heart."
Monsignor Luigi Giussani, From a talk at the Basilica of St. Anthony of Padua, Italy, February 11, 1994.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++

Eucharistic Adoration



We are blessed with many opportunities for daily Mass and Eucharistic Adoration here in Atchison. The times of Adoration are as follows: 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week: St. Benedict’s Parish Church Wednesday and Thursday, 12:30-9:30 PM, St. Martin’s Chapel, Benedictine College Saturday, 8-9 PM Eucharistic Holy Hour, Abbey Church

Six days before he (St. Benedict) left this world, he gave order to have his tomb opened, and forthwith falling into an ague, he began with burning heat to wax faint, and when as the sickness daily increased, on the sixth day he commanded his monks to carry him into the oratory, where he armed himself with receiving the body and blood of our Savior Christ; and having his weak body held up by the hands of his disciples, he stood with his own arms lifted to heaven. As he was praying in that manner, he gave up the ghost. -Life of St. Benedict by Pope St. Gregory the Great.

The time you spend with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament is the best time you will spend on earth. Each moment that you spend with Jesus will deepen your union with Him and make your soul everlastingly more glorious and beautiful in Heaven, and will help bring about everlasting peace on earth,
- Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta

When we go before Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament we represent the one in the world who is in most need of God’s Mercy. We Stand in behalf of the one in the world who does not know Christ and who is farthest away from God and we bring down upon their soul the Precious Blood of The Lamb.
-Pope John Paul II

Physics & Astronomy Colloquium

Dr. David Besson, from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at KU, will give a presentation on the experimental efforts aimed at detecting neutrinos through the radiation produced when they collide with ice molecules. He will cover the rationale for doing this experiment at the South Pole and why ice is such an ideal neutrino target. His talk, "Radiowave Neutrino Detection in Antarctica," is set for this afternoon, Monday , Feb. 5, at 4 p.m. in Room 307 of Westerman Hall. Refreshments will be available prior to the talk. All are cordially invited to attend.

Counter-terrorism in America: An Insider's View

You won't want to miss this interesting lecture by Kevin Brock, Deputy Director of the Counter-Terrorism Center in Washington, D.C.. He's speaking in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium this evening, Monday evening, Feb. 5, at 7 p.m. Stop by and learn what America is doing to stop terrorist attacks on the home front.

An evening of G.K. Chesterton

On March 20, 2007 Chuck Schalberg and Dale Alquist will be here at Benedictine College doing a performance/lecture on the life of G.K. Chesterton. This will be the eve of the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict (celebrated on March 21 by Benedictines) The performance will be on March 20 at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College.

Schalberg and Alquist have a show about Chesterton on EWTN on Sunday evenings. Mark your calendars and plan on attending!

The Declaration of Independence dogmatically bases all rights on the fact that God created all men equal; it is right [to do so].... There is no basis for democracy except in a dogma about the divine origin of man.
G.K. Chesterton

What embitters the world is not excess of criticism, but an absence of self-criticism.
G. K. Chesterton Sidelights on New London and Newer New York

A detective story generally describes six living men discussing how it is that a man is dead. A modern philosophic story generally describes six dead men discussing how any man can possibly be alive."
G.K. Chesterton A Miscellany of Men

Pope to Meet Communion and Liberation

On March 24, 2007, at Noon, Pope Benedict XVI will meet with members of Communion and Liberation ( http://www.clonline.us/home.cfm ) in St. Peter’s Square to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Pontifical recognition of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation.

“Go into all the world" (Mt 28;19) is what Christ said to his disciples. And I repeat to you: "Go into all the world and bring the truth, the beauty, and the peace which are found in Christ the Redeemer". This invitation that Christ made to all his followers and which Peter has the duty ceaselessly to renew, is already interwoven with your history. In these thirty years you have been open to the most varied situations, casting the seed of the presence of your movement. I know that you have put down roots in eighteen nations in the world: in Europe, in Africa, in America, and I know also the insistency with which your presence is sought in other countries. Take on the burden of this ecclesial need: this is the charge I leave with you today.
-Pope John Paul II to Communion and Liberation, September 29, 1984

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

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Pope John Paul II on today’s Feast of the Presentation in the Temple.

The Presentation in the Temple not only expresses the joy of the Child's consecration and the ecstasy of the aged Simeon; it also records the prophecy that Christ will be a “sign of contradiction” for Israel and that a sword will pierce his mother's heart (cf Lk 2:34-35).

Communion and Liberation This Saturday we have the opportunity to have an assembly with Peter Stokman to hear about his experience of the movement in his professional work as a Cardiologist. He will be presenting and briefly talking about a piece of classical music, followed by the assembly and open for questions. This is a good opportunity for those of us deciding on careers paths to ask questions to an adult who's been in the same place we are. Also to understand how meeting the movement has affected his work.

Saturday February 3rd.
11:30 AM Mass, Abbey Church
12:00 Lunch together in the side room of the Cafeteria
1:00 Assembly in Ferrell Tower Classroom
Finish around 2:00
Everyone is welcome.

Dr. Jonathan Reyes to speak at Benedictine College
Dr. Reyes will speak at Benedictine College next Tuesday, February 6, 2007 from 7-8 PM in the O’Malley-McAlister Auditorium. Dr. Reyes is involved with the FOCUS program, and the Augustine Institute in Denver. All are welcome!

An evening of G.K. Chesterton
On March 20, 2007 Chuck Schalberg and Dale Alquist will be here at Benedictine College doing a performance/lecture on the life of G.K. Chesterton. This will be the eve of the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict (celebrated on March 21 by Benedictines) The performance will be on March 20 at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College. Schalberg and Alquist have a show about Chesterton on EWTN on Sunday evenings. Mark your calendars and plan on attending!

No longer to believe in God does not mean to believe in nothing, but instead to believe in everything. This well-known insight of Chesterton well describes the condition of many people today. Having abandoned the Christian faith, and disappointed by the claims of Enlightenment reason, they find themselves defenseless before reality. They are unable to free themselves from the anguish of a radical loneliness when confronted with the world and with time. To-overcome this anguish they resort to magic, which would allow them to gain the protection of occult powers, and they do not refrain from seeking an alliance with these same powers of evil.
-Angelo Cardinal Scola, Archbishop of Venice.

Our founder’s connection with Beethoven
On the autograph of his Missa Solemnis Beethoven has written the motto From the heart – may it go – to the heart!. This very personal dedication, coined for Archduke Rudolph, is derived from Johann Michael Sailer’s (The friend of our founder Father Lemke) translation of Thomas ŕ Kempis’ “De Imitatione Christi” (“The Imitation of Christ”), which had become a popular work. Beethoven admired the theologist Sailer, who was friends with Franz and Antonie Brentano*** and wanted to place his nephew Karl in his custody in Landshut, shortly before he began work on the Mass. The archduke had supported this scheme, although in the end it failed to come about. Even today the motto can still be considered valid, even in the higher sense. (*** It was their relative, the poet Clemens Brentano, who told out founder, Father Lemke, that Lemke was becoming big and fat, chaplain deluxe working for Goethe’s nephew, and that he should to come to America because of the need for priests here. Lemke left the Diocese of Regensburg and became a priest of Philadelphia under Bishop Kenrick, and eventually would go help the great Russian Prince-turned Roman Catholic priest, Demetrius Augustine Galliztin. He eventually got the Benedictines to come to America and joined St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa)

Ravens Respect Life Benefactor to be CBS Sports announcer at Super Bowl
Steve Tasker, one of the great all time NFL special teams players, and a benefactor of Ravens Respect Life at Benedictine College will be working the Super Bowl this coming Sunday. He described more about what he will be doing on his Wednesday blog:

Some people have said to Solomon and me that we have the hardest jobs on game day because we're going to be right there with the players while they're preparing themselves for the biggest game of their lives.

I think we're both respectful of the space that some players need before the game. We don't push it too hard and shove a microphone in somebody's face. We're just observing more than anything else. I usually don't speak to somebody unless they speak to me. I do have a number of good friends in the Colts' organization and I'll speak to those guys and because most of them aren't players I can get away with that.

I think the players respect the fact that we were once players too, and they know we understand what they'll be going through before kickoff.
Well that's it from here in Miami. Catch up with you tomorrow when I try to decide who I'm rooting for with close personal friends on both teams.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++



Ravens Respect Life Benefactor to be CBS Sports announcer at Super Bowl

Steve Tasker, one of the great all time NFL special teams players, and a benefactor of Ravens Respect Life at Benedictine College will be working the Super Bowl this coming Sunday. He wrote on his blog I got down here last night (Sunday) and this should be an exciting week. This is the first time I'm going to be working the Super Bowl for CBS. I'll be working on the Colts sideline Super Bowl Sunday.

+++++ Dr. Jonathan Reyes to speak at Benedictine College
Dr. Reyes will speak at Benedictine College next Tuesday, February 6, 2007 from 7-8 PM in the O’Malley-McAlister Auditorium. All are welcome!

Dr. Jonathan Reyes is the President of the Augustine Institute and Vice President of Formation for the Fellowship of Catholic University Students. Before this he served as the Vice President for Academic Affairs of Christendom College where he oversaw one of the most rigorous academic programs in the country, which includes 84 credits of a core curriculum in the Liberal Arts. He was also chiefly responsible for the successful re-accreditation of Christendom College with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. He received an MA in history from the University of Michigan, and a PhD in history from the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Reyes has spoken on college campuses, at parishes and at conferences across the country. He has given academic lectures and has appeared on EWTN.

+++++ Wangari Matthai Visit
Today President Minnis sent out a thank you for those who helped prepare for the visit of Wangari Matthai this past Sunday. Being in the class of 1964 from our college, Wangari is the only graduate of a Catholic university in America to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

S. Anne Shepard and the Sisters of Mount St. Scholastica Monastery deserve special recognition as well. Anyone who was there on Sunday morning will not soon forget the moment Wangari first walked through the doors of the cafeteria or the special liturgy. S. Thomasita was instrumental in securing Wangari for the day and accompanying her throughout the events. Both are amazing women.

-President Steve Minnis, Benedictine College

+++++ Founder of St. Benedict’s Abbey in Good Company

As the monks of the Abbey, and our friends, celebrate the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Abbey this year, it is interesting to see that our founder, Father Peter Henry Balthasar Lemke, was in good company. Father Lemke converted to the Roman Catholic faith from being a Lutheran pastor under the famous Bishop Johann Michael Sailer of Regensburg. Lemke and Sailer became good friends. Below are what Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II have said about Bishop Sailer.

Joseph Ratzinger (Now Pope Benedict XVI) on Bishop Sailer, the Bishop who received our founder Fr. Lemke into the Roman Catholic Church, and ordained him to the priesthood.

Above all [Bishop Johann Michael Sailer] was a man who not only thought, but lived. If he was on the trail of a theology of the heart, that was not on account of cheap sentimentality, but because he knew about the wholeness of man, who fulfills the unity of his being as the interpenetration of spirit and body of the hidden springs of the mind and the clear vision of the intellect.

Antoine de Saint Exupery once said: "One can see properly only with the heart." If we compare the lifeless progressivism of Matthias Fingerlos with the richness and depth of Sailer the truth of this saying becomes strikingly obvious. Only with the heart can one see properly. Sailer was a visionary because he had a heart. He was able to give birth to something new, something that was big with the future, because he lived by what was enduring, and because he placed himself, his whole life, at its disposal.
-Joseph Ratzinger Faith and the Future
Reprinted from the 1970 German by Franciscan Herald Press.

Pope John Paul II, March 17, 1998 spoke of Bishop Sailer:
Our age needs priests who follow the path that leads from a rationalistic conception of what is possible to belief in divine Revelation, from knowledge to wisdom and from speculation to contemplation, in order to communicate all this to men. Almost 200 years ago the theologian and Bishop Johann Michael Sailer followed this path and formed a generation of priests which made a substantial contribution to Church renewal in all German-speaking lands. He prepared a short formula of faith that is particularly significant on the threshold of the third millennium: God in Christ is the salvation of a sinful world. (formula of Bishop Sailer.)

Lemke describing in his diary how, still as a Lutheran pastor, he was fascinated by the humanity of Bishop Sailer:
During this time, I corresponded most regularly with my friend Adler. He was always in good spirits, and told me much about Sailer and the way the faith was expressed in Catholic Bavaria. And he sent me pamphlets that were not permitted to be handled by book dealers in North Germany. (Being mainly Lutheran piety, or rationalistic)

Lemke describes how Bishop Sailer, and the future Cardinal Diepenbrock, got him the job with Goethe’s nephew. Diepenbrock shared with me the request that Schlosser had made to Sailer and the opportunity it might present; he, Schlosser, was searching for a priest, well-grounded in the Catholic faith, who had not been affected by the indifferentism of the “New Age.” This person also needed to be a well-cultured individual who could present himself well in society and not allow any factions to influence him in any way. I questioned whether I was the man for the job, but both Sailer and Diepenbrock encouraged me to accept it. Thus, in the Fall of 1831, I went to the Neuburg estate.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++

Christopher West in Topeka this evening

God, Sex and the Meaning of Life
Friday, January 26th, 2007
7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Christ the King Church
5972 SW 25th Topeka, Ks.



The other year Christopher West reviewed a book by one of his graduate professors, Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete. In reviewing God at the Ritz. West’s conclusion was: As a Catholic Christian, it is clear that Albacete sees the human mystery as inseparable from the mystery of Christ. But there is not even a hint in his reflections that he is trying to "force-fit" the human drama into a preconceived theological system. With unstinting respect for the personal freedom of the reader, Albacete is reflecting on the questions and experiences we all have. This is why everyone — whatever his or her belief, or struggle to believe — can richly benefit from the "mystical Monsignor's" humble attempt to represent God at the Ritz.

You can purchase God at the Ritz from Amazon.com

+++++ An evening of G.K. Chesterton

On March 20, 2007 Chuck Schalberg and Dale Alquist who together do a show on the great G.K. Chesterton on EWTN will be here at Benedictine College doing a performance/lecture on the life of G.K. Chesterton. This will be the eve of the Solemnity of the Death of St. Benedict (celebrated on March 21 by Benedictines) The performance will be on March 20 at 7:30 PM in the O’Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College. Mark your calendars, all are welcome!!!

Wisdom from G.K. Chesterton

The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people. Men do not differ much about what things they will call evils; they differ enormously about what evils they will call excusable. Religious liberty might be supposed to mean that everybody is free to discuss religion. In practice it means that hardly anybody is allowed to mention it. Misers get up early in the morning; and burglars, I am informed, get up the night before. A dead thing can go with the stream, but only a living thing can go against it.

+++++ Communion and Liberation

The CLU group at Benedictine College meets on Thursday evenings at 6:30 PM for School of Community in the Roost. An adult group meets on Wednesday evenings at 8:30 PM. There are also groups in Kansas City, Wichita, and many other places. Let me know if you have questions about this.

The finest magazine I read each month is Traces, the official publication of Communion and Liberation. I love it because it speaks to my heart about true experiences that others are having that help them in their journey to truth. You can subscribe to Traces online at: http://www.traces-cl.com/

In the September, 2005 Traces, Monsignor Albacete used the experience of St. Benedict to talk about the suffering from Hurricane Katrina:
“Amy and I are wondering, now, what would St. Benedict do? Where would he begin in the midst of so much suffering and so much need?” “Put nothing ahead of Christ’s love.” This is St. Benedict’s rule. Put nothing ahead of that infinite desire awakened by reality. Give witness to the Mercy that saves us. Rebuild what is destroyed, moved by the certainty of that Presence, the basis of a hope that does not disappoint.

_________________________________________________________________________
"Our challenge is to make sure that science serves the cause of humanity instead of the other way around." -President George W. Bush. January 22, 2007

"What is taking place in America is a war against the child. And if we accept that the mother can kill her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill one another." -Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta. National Prayer Breakfast, 1997

"Abortion and embryonic experimentation constitute a direct denial of that attitude of acceptance of others which is indispensable for establishing lasting relationships of peace."
-Pope Benedict XVI, World Day of Peace, January 1, 2007

"NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim and declare the unalienable personhood of every American, from the moment of conception until natural death, and I do proclaim, ordain, and declare that I will take care that the Constitution and laws of the United States are faithfully executed for the protection of America's unborn children."
-President Ronald Reagan. January 14, 1988

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++

Fr. Timothy Fry, OSB (February 12, 1915-January20, 2007)
If you type “Timothy Fry, OSB” into google, you will see the influence our Fr. Timothy had on so many people. Nearly every source that quotes the Rule of St. Benedict around the world uses the translation, and notes, edited by Fr. Timothy. Vespers for the Dead, followed by visitation, will be this evening, Wednesday, January 24, at 7 p.m. in St. Benedict's Abbey Church. The Mass of Christian Burial for Fr. Timothy will be celebrated at St. Benedict's Abbey Church on Thursday, January 25, at 10:30 a.m., with interment following in the Abbey cemetery.

When I finished my novitiate in July of 1986, Abbot Owen asked some of the elders of the community to give my pre-vow retreat. I had conferences by Abbot Cuthbert McDonald, Fr. Peter Beckman, Fr. Aloysius Kropp, and Fr. Timothy. I always remember that Fr. Timothy told me to read Hebrews 11. After I made my vows and he congratulated me on becoming a monk, he told me to “remember the covenant.” This stands out because the first reading at Mass this coming Saturday and Monday are Hebrews 11.

Students and other pray with monks

Many students and other have been joining the monks for prayers in the Abbey Church. The schedule is as follows. (it is a little different the coming days because of the funeral, but this is the normal schedule)

Monday-Friday.
6:20 AM Vigils/ Morning Prayer
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:15 PM Holy Mass
6:45 PM Vespers

Saturday
6:20 AM Vigils/Morning Prayer
11:30 AM Holy Mass/ Midday Prayer
5:35 PM Vespers I for Sunday
6:45 PM Vigils for Sunday
8-9 PM Holy Hour

Sunday
7:00 Am Morning Prayer
10:00 AM Holy Mass
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Vespers II

Along with listening to God's Word there is the commitment to prayer. The Benedictine monastery is above all a place of prayer, in the sense that everything in it is organized to make the monks attentive and responsive to the voice of the Spirit. This is why the complete celebration of the Divine Office, whose centre is the Eucharist and which structures the monastic day, is the "opus Dei" in which "dum cantamus iter facimus ut ad nostrum cor veniat et sui nos amoris gratia accendat".
-Pope John Paul II

March for Life

The pilgrimage for life that Brother Joseph and I took with 100 Benedictine College students was an incredible experience. I am so proud of our students. The trip out and back was like being on a retreat. Then when we arrived in Washington, I kept running into Benedictine College graduates: young nuns, seminarians, priests, FOCUS missionaries, youth ministers, and others who learned to love the Roman Catholic faith here at Benedictine College.

Archbishop Raymond Burke from St. Louis thanked me for the good work we are doing here. Fr. Frank Pavone wants to come visit campus and talk to the students. So many people remember the good work our confrere Father Matthew Habiger, OSB has done for the pro-life movement as President of Human Life International, and now spreading the good news of God’s plan for life and love. Many others have read about us in the National Catholic Register, or heard about us on EWTN.

Our challenge is to make sure that science serves the cause of humanity instead of the other way around.
-President George W. Bush. January 22, 2007

What is taking place in America is a war against the child. And if we accept that the mother can kill her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill one another.
-Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta. National Prayer Breakfast, 1997

Abortion and embryonic experimentation constitute a direct denial of that attitude of acceptance of others which is indispensable for establishing lasting relationships of peace.
-Pope Benedict XVI, World Day of Peace, January 1, 2007

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim and declare the unalienable personhood of every American, from the moment of conception until natural death, and I do proclaim, ordain, and declare that I will take care that the Constitution and laws of the United States are faithfully executed for the protection of America's unborn children
.-President Ronald Reagan. January 14, 1988

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu













Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++

1) At Christmas we celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. The fact that Christ has come into our midst and we continue to experience Him as a present reality is something that happens now, and for which we live. Know that the monks of the Abbey will remember you in a special way in these coming days.

Christmas at the Abbey, 2006

Christmas Eve. Sunday, December 24, 2006

5:05 PM Vespers
7:00 PM Vigils
8:00 PM Christmas Eve Mass

Christmas Day. Monday, December 25, 2006

7:00 AM Lauds
10:00 AM Mass of Christmas Day
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

+++++ 2) Pope John Paul II mentioned that a man who taught the world the truth about Christ, and thus was a model for the new evangelization, was Bishop Johann Michael Sailer (Bishop of Regensburg, Germany from 1822-1832.)

On March 17 1998 Pope John Paul II told a meeting of the Rectors of Major Seminaries from Germany that Sailer had as a theme of his preaching: "God in Christ is the salvation of the sinful world." Thus the Holy Father raised the great Bishop Sailer as an example for the world as it prepared for the great Jubilee Year

On April 11, 1826, this same model of the new evangelization, Bishop Sailer ordained the founder of St. Benedict's Abbey, Fr. Peter Henry Lemcke to the priesthood. Father Lemcke, a convert from being a Lutheran pastor in the Mecklenburg region of northern Germany had become disillusioned by the unbelief of the Enlightenment. He said that as a Lutheran student at Rostock, Mecklenburg (not far from the Baltic Sea) he came to the conclusion that "it was certainly not a foolish idea to have Christ as the focal point of the world's history -- for everything that happened before Him, and everything that took place after Him shows this relationship to Christ."

This line of thought was very similar to what Pope John Paul II would teach in his first encyclical when he taught the world that "THE REDEEMER OF MAN, Jesus Christ, is the centre of the universe and of history. To him go my thoughts and my heart in this solemn moment of the world that the Church and the whole family of present-day humanity are now living."

Our founder was drawn to Bishop Sailer, and the Regensburg circle of Catholicism because he believed Sailer "held in his hand a spiritual banner that reached all the way from the Baltic Sea to the Swiss mountains."

+++++ 3) This message of Christ is worth celebrating. Beginning in 2007, the monks of St. Benedict's Abbey will be celebrating our 150th anniversary of witnessing to the Gospel and our Roman Catholic faith. Father Denis Meade, OSB, JCD, is chairing a committee preparing for the 150th anniversary of St. Benedict's Abbey. Major events will include:

a) Sunday, April 29th, 2007: Church Dedication following the handicap access improvements. Opening of the anniversary year Mass of Dedication at 1:30 pm with Archbishop Joseph Naumann as celebrant.

b) Saturday, July 7, 2007. Brazil Day. Welcoming the Monks from our Priory in Mineiros, Brazil.

c) Sunday, July 8, 2007. Festival of Faith; Procession of Parishes, Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, OSB, Ph.D. of St. Vincent Archabbey, our founding monastery, will be principal celebrant.

d) Sunday, April 27, 2008. Closing Festivities.

We are certainly grateful for -The monastic life here at the Abbey that continues to be centered on the Mass, the Liturgy of the Hours, and daily time for private contemplative prayer for the monks.
-growth in the Catholic identity of Benedictine College and Maur Hill-Mount Academy, the Benedictine parishes, grade schools and mission and Brazil staffed by our monks.

-New members who have joined our Priory in Brazil, and the Abbey here in Atchison in recent years. -Friends, like you, who continue to pray for the monks. Prayer is so vital for our continued success!!! May Jesus Christ who began a good work here 150 years ago, continue to be the cornerstone of our lives as He leads us to experience the deep communion of the Blessed Trinity.

+++++ 4) -After Christmas I will be going to the United States Diaconia for Communion and Liberation in San Diego, Ca from January 11-15, 2007. On that Friday there will be a meeting for college leaders of CLU. Father Carron, the successor of Monsignor Giussani will be there for the weekend. -Br. Joseph Ryan, OSB, and I will be attending the March for Life with the BC students from January 19-23, 2007

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++

-Last Thursday evening the choir stalls in the Abbey Church were filled, as guests came to witness Brs. Leven and Ignatius be clothed in the Benedictine habit and begin their year of novitiate. The choir stalls hold 174 people. Abbot Barnabas told us in his beautiful homily that when he joined in 1957 we filled the choir with monks, and we hope to do so again some day.

+++++ -On Saturday December 9, the Feast of St. Juan Diego, Br. Jeremy Heppler, OSB, professed his solemn vows as a monk of our Abbey. So many people know Br. Jeremy for the awesome work he did in Campus Ministry at Benedictine College for two years. He completed the first semester of studies for the priesthood at St. Vincent Seminary in Latrobe, Pa.

+++++ Christmas at the Abbey, 2006

Christmas Eve. Sunday, December 24, 2006

5:05 PM Vespers
7:00 PM Vigils
8:00 PM Christmas Eve Mass
Christmas Day. Monday, December 25, 2006

7:00 AM Lauds
10:00 AM Mass of Christmas Day
12:05 PM Midday Prayer
5:05 PM Solemn Vespers

The angel of the Lord appeared to them and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were struck with great fear. The angel said to them, "Do not be afraid; for behold, I proclaim to you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. For today in the city of David a savior has been born for you who is Messiah and Lord. And this will be a sign for you: you will find an infant wrapped in swaddling clothes and lying in a manger." And suddenly there was a multitude of the heavenly host with the angel, praising God and saying:"Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests."
Luke 2, 9-14

+++++ The founder of St. Benedict's Abbey, Father Peter Balthasar Henry Lemcke, O.S.B. was a convert from Lutheranism to Roman Catholicism.

When he was baptized as a Lutheran on August 1, 1796, his maternal grandfather had written the following prayer in his memoirs "Heavenly Father, allow this, your servant, to become someone who will sow seeds that will extend your kingdom, and that he himself might become an eternally glowing star in your kingdom. We ask that you do this as praise to You and a blessing for him. Amen."

When Fr. Lemcke was received into the Roman Catholic Church by the saintly Bishop Johann Michael Sailer of Regensburg on April 21, 1824, Bishop Sailer said "before our new brother and friend in Christ Jesus, Peter Henry Lemcke, presents his profession of faith and therby manifests his transfer into the Roman Catholic Churchh, we would like to present to him this holy authority given to us in the words of holy scripture and which will be read to us by our "evangelist" Diepenbrock." (Note, Melchior Diepenbrock was a close friend of Father Lemcke; would preach at Fr. Lemcke's First Mass two years later; and would go on to become the Cardinal Archbishop of Breslau. Diepenbrock also introduced Fr. Lemcke to good King Ludwig I of Bavaria.)

On April 25, 1826 (just two years after becoming a Roman Catholic) Father Lemcke was ordained, and celebrated his First Mass. Father (later Cardinal) Diepenbrock preached on the text "See, I send you like sheep into the midst of wolves. Therefore, be wise like the serpent, but also be without guile, like the dove." This same text would also be used by Father Lemcke's friend Bishop Bernard McQuaid of Rochester, NY 50 years later on the occasion of Lemcke's Golden Jubilee.

On April 25, 1876, Fr. Lemcke celebrated his fiftieth anniversary of Fr. Lemcke's ordination to the priesthood at St. Walburga's Monastery Church in Elizabeth, N.J. Bishop Michael Augustine Corrigan of Newark (later Archbishop of New York) and Bishop Bernard McQuaid of Rochester, N.Y. were present. Bishop McQuaid preached the homily, and in part said: We are assembled here on the feast of St. Mark, a disciple of Jesus Christ, called by him and instructed to go forth and spread the message. It is this same message that we celebrate even now and which, today, we honor in the person of another disciple of Jesus Christ. He, also, heard the call of the Master, left everything in order to follow Him and to spread forth the wonderful message of the Gospel.

+++++ Pope Benedict XVI First encounter with Communion and Liberation

If I am not mistaken, in 1970, along with a group of Frenchmen, amongst whom was Fr De Lubac, and others, like Hans Urs von Balthasar, we had decided to create a new review called Communio, and we were looking for an Italian partner. Balthasar had come to know the young people in Milan belonging to Communion and Liberation, and he told us, łThis could be the group that we are looking for.˛ So we met them and spent a day together. It was an interesting discovery for me; I had never heard of this group until that moment, and I saw young people full of fervor for the faith, quite far from a sclerotic and weary Catholicism, and without the mentality of łprotest˛­which considers all that was there before the Council as totally superseded­but a faith that was fresh, profound, open and with the joy of being believers, of having found Jesus Christ and His Church. There, I understood that there was a new start, there was really a renewed faith that opens doors to the future.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++

The season of Advent begins this Sunday.

-From Pope Benedict XVI, last Advent:
"We could say that Advent is the time when Christians should awaken in their hearts the hope that they can change the world, with the help of God,"
"Advent is a time of great religious inspiration, because it is steeped in hope and spiritual expectation,"
"Every time the Christian community prepares to remember the birth of the Redeemer, it experiences a quiver of joy that it transmits to a certain extent to the whole of society."

+++++

-From a Homily by Pope John Paul II
"Advent is the liturgical season that prepares us for the Lord's birth, but it is also the time of expectation for the definitive return of Christ for the last judgement, and St. Paul refers, in the first place, to this second coming. The very fact that the conclusion of the liturgical year coincides with the beginning of Advent suggests that "the beginning of the time of salvation. is in some way linked to the "end of time". This exhortation typical of Advent always applies: 'The Lord is at hand!'."

+++++

-Monsignor Luigi Giussani, Communion and Liberation
"You will feel more yourself, because you recognize and love Jesus more and more. This, in any case, will be the meditation that we shall develop from the beginning of Advent onwards for the whole year.
This year no one wanted to, but I myself chose to exalt Christian ontology as the new actor in the history of the world, as the winning actor: while He was killed He was winning, as Eliot says (go look it up)."

+++++

Lessons & Carols Service Set for Monday Night, Dec. 4

The Office of Campus Ministry at Benedictine College and the Benedictine College Department of Music will present the annual Service of Lessons and Carols on Monday, December 4, at 7:30 p.m. in St. Benedict's Abbey Church. Modeled after the traditional Christmas Eve Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols, originated in Cambridge, England in 1918, this service includes Old Testament readings and Advent hymns that prepare the congregation for the coming of Christ’s birth.

Featured on the BC program will be: the Benedictine College Concert Chorale and Chamber Singers under the direction of Dr. Ruth Krusemark; the Benedictine College Liturgical Choir directed by Brother Ambrose Nelson; St. Benedict's Abbey Schola directed by Fr. Blaine Schultz; and the Benedictine Brass directed by Dr. Michael Davidson. Additional special numbers will be presented by Dr. Karen Minter, soprano, Mrs. Margaret Kew, violin, and Eric Kerschen, tenor.

This special Advent service is free and open to the public.

+++++

-On Thursday, December 7 our postulants will be clothed with the Benedictine habit to begin their year of novitiate. This will take place at Evening Prayer at 6:45 PM in the Abbey Church.

-On Saturday, December 9, Br. Jeremy Heppler, OSB, will profess his solemn vows as a Benedictine monk at 10:30 AM in the Abbey Church.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) This Sunday we celebrate the Solemnity of Christ the King. The following quotation is taken from QUAS PRIMAS (On the Feast of Christ the King), an Encyclical by Pope Pius XI promulgated on 11 December 1925

"It was surely right, then, in view of the common teaching of the sacred books, that the Catholic Church, which is the kingdom of Christ on earth, destined to be spread among all men and all nations, should with every token of veneration salute her Author and Founder in her annual liturgy as King and Lord, and as King of Kings. And, in fact, she used these titles, giving expression with wonderful variety of language to one and the same concept, both in ancient psalmody and in the Sacramentaries. She uses them daily now in the prayers publicly offered to God, and in offering the Immaculate Victim. The perfect harmony of the Eastern liturgies with our own in this continual praise of Christ the King shows once more the truth of the axiom: Legem credendi lex statuit supplicandi. The rule of faith is indicated by the law of our worship."

+++++ 2) Father Christopher Henderson, a Father of Mercy, has been visiting the Abbey for several days of retreat. Father is currently the chaplain for the new group of Benedictine nuns in the KC-St. Joseph, Missouri Diocese: The Benedictine of Mary, Queen of Apostles, Priory of Ephesus. This community prays the traditional Latin Liturgy and Tridentine Mass.

Father Christopher is friends with our Father Matthew Habiger, OSB, (formerly President of Human Life International in Virginia) and Father James Downey, OSB, (Brother of our deceased former Abbot Brendan Downey, and former Director of the Institute for Religious Life in Chicago.)

+++++ 3) Benedictine College Lessons and Carols, Monday, December 4, 7:30 PM, Abbey Church, All are welcome.

+++++ 4) Reception of habit for Novices of St. Benedict's Abbey, Thursday, December 7, 6:45 PM, Abbey Church.

+++++ 5) Solemn Vows for Br. Jeremy Heppler, OSB, Saturday, December 9, 10:30 AM, Abbey Church.

+++++ 6) Every weekend for the last 22 years Dr. Rick Coronado of the BC economics department has organized delivery of meals to the poor and elderly. Every week there are 150 meals delivered by BC students, faculty, staff and administration.

+++++ 7) Keep praying for the pro-life movement. As we celebrate the Solemnity of Christ the King, may our Blessed Mother inspire each of us to work for a respect of every life as a gift from God.

+++++ 8) Nazarene Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo. to sponsor a discussion with George Lindbeck (Yale), David Burrell (Notre Dame), Stanley Hauerwas (Duke), and Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete (Communion and Liberation).
The following is from Pastor John Wright, Point Loma Nazarene University, California http://www.pastorjohnwright.org/archives/2006/10/george_lindbeck.html
"I have spent much time the past seven months working on a project to bring together George Lindbeck, David Burrell, and Stanley Hauerwas to discuss how the "back to the sources" movement that led to Vatican II has influenced so-called "postliberalism" or the "Yale School." I have many reasons to want to listen carefully to such a discussion. Largely, I must confess, I have committed myself to such a task because I see profound parallels between Roman Catholicism and the life of the Methodist-holiness movement, in particular the Church of the Nazarene in the 20th century. I see the contests within pre- and post-Vatican II Roman Catholicism as extremely enlightening even to understand the often contested mission of the Church of the Nazarene in Mid-City.

"The discussion between Professors Lindbeck, Burrell, and Hauerwas is going to take place on January 18-19th in Kansas City, Missouri at Nazarene Theological Seminary. NTS has willingly, even enthusiastically, sponsored the project -- and I owe a great deal of thanks to President Ron Benefiel and Professor Andy Johnson. Last week I received confirmation that Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete, who has oversight responsibilities in the United States of the new religious movement, Communion and Liberation, will conduct the interviews. I honestly think that Wesley's Methodist movement has deep structural parallels to Communion and Liberation as a movement to renew the church catholic from within by emphasizing holiness through a return to the sources of the Christian life. We all have much to learn as the Spirit returns us to the central mystery of our faith: Christ has died, Christ is risen, and Christ will come again."

Lindbeck, Burrell, and Hauerwas NTS hosts a conversation among friends łIs the Reformation Over?˛ A conversation among friends George Lindbeck, David Burrell, and Stanley Hauerwas
January 18 ­ 19, 2007
NTS Chapel

Thursday, January 18 - 7:00pm Introduction, opening comments and overview from Lindbeck, Burrell and Hauerwas Reception immediately following

Friday, January 19 - 8:00am ­ 6:00pm Separate interviews with Lindbeck, Burrell and Hauerwas reflecting on their life and theology, followed by their panel discussion centered around the discussion, łIs the Reformation Over?˛

REGISTER EARLY after 10/13/06! Space for this event is limited and we anticipate that it will fill up quickly.
REGISTRATION FEE(on or before 1/12/07): $40 [Current NTS Students: $15] Late and on-site registration fee (IF space allows, after 1/12/07): $50 For guaranteed registrations received on or before 1/12/07, registration fee will include all sessions; Thursday night reception; and continental breakfast, lunch and breaks on Friday. We regret that we cannot guarantee late and on-site registrants a seat and/or participation in meals and breaks

This special series made possible by the Benner Memorial Endowment, which was established in honor and memory of Dr. Hugh C. Benner, the Seminaryąs first President.

Register online to attend this dialogue http://www.nts.edu/news/index.cfm
For more information, contact Pamala Asher in the Dean's Office at pjasher@nts.edu or at 800.831.3011, ext. 226.

For further information contact:
Pam Asher
Administrative Assistant
1700 East Meyer Blvd.
Kansas City, MO 64131
(816) 333-6254, ext. 226
(816) 333-6271

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

-In my last e-mail I meant to say that the BC Lessons and Carols is on December 4, 2006 (not 2007 as I had written) at 7:30 PM in the Abbey Church.
I know it's good to plan ahead, but one year at a time is enough.

+ -Please pray for the mother of BC basketball player Ronnie Tyson. She is in a coma at this time. May Ronnie also be strengthened by all our prayers.

+ -Please also remember Bernadette (Beany) Mullenix from Denver, Co. in your prayers. She has had cancer for several years, and it looks like she is nearing the end of her life.

Her family and my dad's family were friends growing up in Claflin, Ks during the great depression. Her dad, Doctor Jury, was the medical doctor for that region of Barton County, Ks. Another classmate of Claflin High from the same time is Governor Walter Hickel, my dad's first cousin, who was Governor of Alaska and Secretary of the Interior for President Nixon.

Those were interesting days to grow up in central Kansas as a Catholic: the Ku Klux Klan was around, mixed with the economic struggle of the great depression, and the coming Second World War. Yet they were strong people who loved their Catholic faith, and their nation. May we also be brave in our faith, and give thanks on this Thanksgiving for what God has given us.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ -As we prepare for Thanksgiving this week, may we all be thankful for the gifts that God has bestowed upon us. The Abbey Mass on Thanksgiving day will be at 11:30 AM.

+++++ -The annual Benedictine College Music Department/Campus Ministry Lessons and Carols will be Monday December 4, 2007 at 7:30 PM in the Abbey Church. All are invited to this free event.

+++++ -On Thursday, December 7 at the 6:45 PM Vespers our two Abbey postulants, Andy Soukup, and Leven Harton, will be clothed in the Benedictine habit and begin their year of novitiate.

+++++ -On Saturday, December 9 at 10:30 AM in the Abbey Church, Br. Jeremy Heppler, OSB, will profess his solemn vows as a Benedictine monk. All are welcome. Br. Jeremy recently wrote me to say that he appreciates all the prayers people are offering up for him as he prepares to profess his solemn vows as a monk of St. Benedict's Abbey.

+++++ -On the occasion of the XXV Anniversary of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, the Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, will grant an audience in St. Peterąs Square to the members of Communion and Liberation on Saturday, March 24, 2007, at 12.00 noon.

"Fr Giussani proposed the łcompanionship˛ of Christ to very many youngsters who, now adults, consider him their spiritual łfather.˛ He set aside every prospect of an academic career and devoted himself to the formation of students needing points of reference and models for inspiration. In the sixties, he began his evangelizing activity presenting the truth of the faith with an open and unceasing dialogue, with a coherent docility to the Churchąs magisterium and above all with an exemplary witness of life.

Thus was born the Movement of Communion and Liberation, which grew in the course of the years thanks to the apostolic ardour of this fervent Ambrosian priest, who was able to engage many disciples in an impassioned missionary journey."
-Pope John Paul II

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

Novices and Final Vows:

-On Thursday, December 7, at the 6:45 PM First Vespers for for the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, Leven Harton, and Andy Soukup will be clothed in the Benedictine habit and begin their year of novitiate.

-On Saturday, December 9 at 10:30 AM, Br. Jeremy Heppler, OSB, will profess his solemn vows as a monk of St. Benedict's Abbey in the Abbey Church. Students, faculty, and staff still fondly remember his years as Director of Campus Ministry here at Benedictine College, and the hard work he did in building a successful program. Along with Br. Gregory Dulmes, OSB, and Br. Luke Baker, OSB, Br. Jeremy is currently in his first year of studies for the priesthood at St. Vincent Seminary in Latrobe, Pa.

+++++ This coming weekend our Vocation Director, Prior James Albers, OSB, is hosting a vocation retreat at the Abbey. Please continue to pray for the young men who are interested in following the Lord Jesus as monks of our Abbey. If you, or someone you know is interested in the monastic life here at the Abbey, contact Prior James at jalbers@kansasmonks.org

+++++ -This evening (Thursday) I will be celebrant for a Mass of healing with the charismatic group in Topeka, Ks. at 7 PM at Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic Church. This on the Feast of St. Gertrude, a great Benedictine mystic who came to know Christ through revelations in which Christ revealed the depth of love in His Sacred Heart.

-The Fall Benedictine College Koinonia retreat will be this coming weekend at SS. Peter and Paul Catholic Church and School in Fall City, Ne. -The Communion and Liberation University (CLU) students from the area will be having a study/retreat weekend the first weekend of December. -The FOCUS program on campus continues to thrive. I am continually hearing of students involved with Bible studies and growing in their faith through the fellowship offered.

-Benedictine College will be taking two buses of students to the March for Life in January, 2007. In spite of the bad news on election day, I continue to be edified by the grass roots support for life.

+++++ Benedictine College Involved in International Conference on Peace and Justice at the Vatican.

President of Benedictine College Stephen D. Minnis will be headed to Rome this week as an invited participant in an international conference titled łThe University and the Social Doctrine of the Church.˛ The program, set for November 17 and 18, is a joint undertaking of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace and the Congregation for Catholic Education.

Cardinal Renato Raffaele Martino, president of the Pontifical Council, has invited colleges and universities to discuss how to better incorporate the teachings of social justice into the university setting and effectively spread peace and justice throughout the world. More than 150 people from five continents will take part in the conference and Benedictine is one of only 15 institutions participating from North America.

łBenedictine College is honored to have been invited to this important conference,˛ Minnis said. łIąll be excited to relay information on how we are already incorporating aspects of social justice and outreach in our college community.˛

Minnis noted that the Hunger Coalition, Ravens Respect Life, Social Justice Week and the Skip-a-Meal program, along with numerous service learning projects, are solid examples of Benedictine Collegeąs efforts to focus on peace and justice both on campus and in the community. In addition, the collegeąs economics department has incorporated Catholic social teaching into all its classes by requiring students to read and discuss relevant social teaching documents.

łBeing the only Catholic college in America to boast of a Nobel Peace Prize winner, we are particularly passionate about peace and social justice,˛ added Minnis. College alumna and 2004 Nobel Peace Laureate Dr. Wangari Maathai will give an address at the college January 28, 2007.

Many notable speakers are scheduled to address the conference, including Cardinal Zenon Grocholewski, Cardinal Camillo Ruini, Archbishop Jozef Zyncinsky and Cardinal Martino. Topics of the various addresses cover the Social Doctrine of the Church and how it relates to theology, philosophy, the economy, scientific research, political science, law and faith formation.

Benedictine College has a study-abroad campus in Florence, Italy in addition to its main campus in Atchison. While in Italy, President Minnis intends to visit the 40 undergraduate students currently studying on that campus.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St. Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ I) The current issue of the Communion and Liberation magazine "Traces" has a picture of Pope Benedict XVI on the cover with the title: "We stand by the Pope. Broadening Reason."

On page 5 there is a great quote from Giussani:

"Another time, there was a town's mafia boss; it was a big town, even today we still hear of it- Jericho. He was the mafia boss there, head of the tax collectors, his soul sold to the Romans. He heard that Jesus was in town, because everyone was talking of it in the area. He went ahead of the crowd and climbed a sycamore tree- not a very tall tree- to be able to see Him because he was too short. The crowd came nearer, and Jesus was talking. He is passing and stops in front of him: "Zaccaeus, I respect you, I am coming to your house. Go home because I am coming to see you." I don't know what Zaccheus did later in life, maybe worse things than before, but in his life what was fixed in his soul, around which his heart revolved, in hope and in sorrow, in repentance and in expiation, was the memory of that instant, the instant in which that man looked at him and said, "Zaccheus." Have we tried to think that the same thing happens to us and we are so distracted that we don't realize it."

-Monsignor Luigi Giussani. Notes from a talk in the Basilica of St. Anthony of Padua, Italy, February 11, 1994.)

(To find out more about the dynamic movement Communion and Liberation go to http://www.clonline.org/ )

+++++++ II) This Sunday at 3 PM in the Abbey Church the BC Brass, the Benedictine College orchestra, and the BC Concert Chorale will be performing. Included will be Faure's Requiem with full orchestra and chorus. All are welcome to attend this free event! (I heard them practicing last night and can testify that it is beautiful.)

+++++++ III) Pray for the following who have died:

A) Sister Julia Wilkinson, OSB 80, died Tuesday evening, November 7, at Mount St. Scholastica. The vigil service will be in the monastery chapel Thursday, November 9, 2006, at 7pm, and the Mass of Resurrection will be there Friday, November 10, at 10:30am. Sr. Julia taught sociology for many years at Benedictine College. May she rest in peace and be remembered gratefully in our prayers.

B) Rusty Norris, President of our high school, Maur Hill-Mount Academy last year, and a fine Catholic gentleman, died of cancer. His funeral was earlier in the week. Abbot Barnabas and Father Brendan and Marion concelebrated the funeral, along with other priests of the Archdiocese. Archbishop Naumann was the celebrant. May he rest in peace.

C) Sr. Fidelia, one of the Mexican sisters who worked at the Abbey, the college, and the high school as a cook died last week. Sr. Fidelia was part of the Guadalupana Benedictine Sisters of Christ the King. For many years they were faithful witnesses of the Evangelical Counsels as they cooked for the monks, and in our schools. May she rest in peace.

D) George Aguirre, uncle of BC graduate Julie (Aguirre) Johnson, died recently. May he rest in peace.

___________________________________________________ "The creed is not a collection of propositions; it is not a theory. It is anchored in the event of baptism -- a genuine encounter between God and man. In the mystery of baptism, God stoops to meet us; he comes close to us and brings us in turn closer to each other."
-Pope Benedict XVI

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu









Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ I) All Saints Day, Wednesday, November 1, 2006

-Archbishop Naumann to Celebrate All Saints Day Mass (Reception to Follow)

The Most Reverend Joseph Naumann will celebrate the Benedictine College All School Mass in the Abbey Church on November 1st, the Feast of All Saints.
Immediately following the 10 a.m. Mass there will be a reception in the Monte Cassino Inn and all faculty, staff and students are cordially invited.

-Also, the 9:30 PM Masses on Tuesday and Wednesday in the St. Martin's Chapel will be for All Saints Day, a Holy Day of Obligation for all Roman Catholics.

+++++ II) All Souls Day, Thursday, November 2, 2006
A) -Marian Advocacy Group to Present Program on Purgatory

Have you ever wondered about Purgatory? To find out more, attend the program, "Purgatory: What Is It?" at 7 p.m. on Nov. 2 in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium in the Student Union. Dr. Kevin Bryant, from the BC sociology department, will deliver this interesting presentation, sponsoed by Marian Advocacy. It is free and open to the public. Free literature, food, and refreshments will be available.

B) -Also the 8:20 AM Mass at the parish, the 12:05 PM Mass in St. Martin's Chapel, the Abbey 5:15 PM Mass, and the 9:30 PM St. Martin's Chapel Mass will be for All Souls. Following the 9:30 PM Mass there will be a procession to the Marian statue in front of the library and prayers for the souls in purgatory. Also Fr. Marion and Fr. Meinrad will be available following the procession for Confessions.

+++++ III) Communion and Liberation University (CLU) and the Presidential Ambassadors at Benedictine College invite you to the following presentation next Thursday, November 2:

"Word on the Pope: 'Faith, Reason, and the University' The Influence of Reason and Hellenism on Christian thought."
Benedictine College, Atchison, Ks, Thursday, Nov. 2nd, 2006, at 8 pm in the Heritage Room (2nd floor) in Ferrell Hall.

Main presenter: Luca Grillo, doctoral student in classics at Princeton University.

Panel: Dr. Snyder (BC history department), Dr. Macierowski (BC philosophy department), and Professor Blosser (BC Religious Studies department) will make up the panel.

Also visiting Benedictine College that day will be Giorgio Vittadini from Communion and Liberation in Milan, Italy. Giorgio was a friend of Monsignor Giussani. He is a Professor of Statistics at the University of Milan in Italy.

+++++ IV) Next weekend I will be visiting the Communion and Liberation communities in San Diego and Los Angeles, Ca. I will be giving talks in both places on Monsignor Luigi Giussani's "At the Origin of the Christian Claim." If you know anyone in these places, here is the information on my talks:

A. Saturday, November 4, 6:45-8:15 PM
Church of St. Mary Magdalene
1945 Illion Street
San Diego, Ca. 92110

B. Sunday, November 5, 4:00 PM
St. Mark Catholic Church
940 Coeur D'Alene Ave.
Venice, Ca. 90291

+++++ V) From Pope John Paul the Great

"Where hatred seemed to corrupt the whole of life leaving no escape from its logic, they proved that "love is stronger than death". Within terrible systems of oppression which disfigured man, in places of pain, amid the hardest of privations, through senseless marches, exposed to cold and hunger, tortured, suffering in so many ways, they loudly proclaimed their loyalty to Christ crucified and risen."

-Pope John Paul II, May 7, 2000

___________________________________________________ "Plot no evil against your neighbor, against one who lives at peace with you. Quarrel not with a man without cause, with one who has done you no harm."
-Proverbs 3, 29-30

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu









Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) There will be a National Rally outside of the Stowers Institute (50th and Troost) today, October 26, at 1:00 pm. The Stowers Institute is located close to UMKC.

This rally will be attended by many across the country who stand with us against the Missouri Stem Cell Initiative. Please attend this rally. It is my understanding that there will be both local and national media coverage. It is very important that there are a lot of people there, with signs in hand, to show a united front against Amendment 2.

+++++ 2) On Friday, Oct. 27th (tomorrow) Ravens Respect Life is hosting speaker Jason Scott Thomas of HLI- Human Life International in St. Augustine Lounge of Turner Hall at Benedictine College from 3:00-4:15. Jason will come with the director of Pro-Life Activities from the Diocese of Kansas City/St. Joe. He is making a tour of Missouri during these very important weeks preceding the November 7th election. Jason will talk about Missouri Amendment 2, what it really says and how the Amendment is trying to trick voters into voting for it. For those who are not completely sure what Amendment 2 says, he will break it down for us.

It is a privilege to get Jason to talk on our campus and I encourage all of you to attend. Jason is a nationally known speaker in the Pro-Life movement and began his career as a Pro-Life university student in Hawaii. He was an atheist at the time and now he works for one of the largest Pro-Life Catholic organizations in the world. He might speak on his journey, and how all people, no matter religion, can come to an educated consensus that Pro-Choice is wrong.

He will end his talk by asking for some help from Pro-Life students at Benedictine to get as many Missouri citizens as possible to the polls. They may ask some people to man the phones, go door to door, or get things out into the media. Whatever we are asked to do will be a big help in the upcoming election. Remember, if we are not stopping the problem, we are part of the problem. Politicians say, that if Missouri falls, Kansas and Nebraska may be next. We must do our part to stop this evil at its head. Please show up on Friday at 3, and continue to pray for the Pro-Life movement.

-Matthew Perkins
President Ravens Respect Life

+++++ 3) Communion and Liberation University (CLU) and the Presidential Ambassadors at Benedictine College invite you to the following presentation a week from today:
"Word on the Pope: 'Faith, Reason, and the University' The Influence of Reason and Hellenism on Christian thought."

Benedictine College, Atchison, Ks, Thursday, Nov. 2nd, 2006, at 8 pm in the Heritage Room (2nd floor) in Ferrell Hall.

Main presenter: Luca Grillo, doctoral student in classics at Princeton University.
Panel: Dr. Snyder (BC history department), Dr. Macierowski (BC philosophy department), and Professor Blosser (BC Religious Studies department) will make up the panel.

Also visiting Benedictine College that day will be Giorgio Vittadini from Communion and Liberation in Milan, Italy.

___________________________________________________ "Plot no evil against your neighbor, against one who lives at peace with you. Quarrel not with a man without cause, with one who has done you no harm." -Proverbs 3, 29-30

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu









Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ -This Wednesday Ravens Respect Life here at Benedictine College will be hosting a day of silence. Students and others will observe a day of silence to commemorate those who have no voice in our society: the unborn, and the elderly.

-Ravens Respect Life also invites of of you to come listen to Jason Scott Jones speak this Friday, October 27, at 3 PM in the St. Augustine Lounge of Turner Hall*** here at Benedictine College. Mr. Jones, the media director of Human Life International in Virginia (the group started by Fr. Paul Marx, OSB and headed by our Fr. Matthew Habiger, OSB for several years)
*** Turner Hall is the Freshmen men's dorm. The St. Augustine Lounge is on the main floor.

-Ask Our Lady of Guadalupe to guide our nation as we draw near the elections, to give all of us strength. Of all the "scandals" the media is dredging up these days, none of them compares with the scandal of a nation that allows 4,000 innocent babies to be murdered every day.

-This past weekend many of the graduates of Benedictine College who have gone on to do FOCUS work around the nation returned to campus. It is so refreshing to see this dynamic program both here and around the country as it touches the hearts of thousands of people.

-The Knights of Columbus continue to grow on campus. Already this year we have nearly 35 new members in the council. The Knights have put together a choir that sings at the 9:30 PM Monday night Mass every week.

___________________________________________________ "Plot no evil against your neighbor, against one who lives at peace with you. Quarrel not with a man without cause, with one who has done you no harm." -Proverbs 3, 29-30

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu









Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ Please mark your calendars for Saturday, Oct 21 for the monthly archdiocesan pro-life Mass. Archbishop Naumann is celebrating this Mass. We need to show up in record numbers to show him thanks for his tremendous leadership in the pro-life issues.

This is particularly important because of the courage he recently demonstrated by publicly speaking about the pro-abortion record of Governor Sebelius and asking for prayers for her so "that she might reconsider her long held position supporting legalized abortion." His statement has gained both state and national attention. It is very important that we stand in support with him.

If possible, please make whatever sacrifice is required for you to participate in the Mass on Saturday, Oct. 21. And bring friends.

What an inspiring sight it would be to have several hundred in attendance at Mass and to then process and pray in front of the abortion clinic. This would also be a beautiful public witness during Respect Life month. Please consider publishing the attached bulletin article in the weeks prior to Oct. 21. Also, please forward this email to your friends. Thank you.

(From the KC Young Adult e-mail message)
Details are as follows:

Mass is at 8:00 am at Sts. Cyril & Methodius, 44 N. Mill, Kansas City, Ks. Immediately after Mass is a rosary procession to the abortion clinic approximately 4 blocks away. Eucharistic adoration is available for those not processing. Benediction concludes services by 10:00 am.

___________________________________________________ "Plot no evil against your neighbor, against one who lives at peace with you. Quarrel not with a man without cause, with one who has done you no harm." -Proverbs 3, 29-30

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ In 1971 St. Benedict's College in Atchison held its last graduation ceremony before becoming, the next year, along with Mt. St. Scholastica College: Benedictine College. The speaker and recipient of an Honorary Doctorate for that last commencement was Dr. Edmund Pellegrino. He has appeared again recently, speaking at the Communion and Liberation Meeting of the Friendship among People in Rimini, Italy this past August.

Dr. Pellegrino currently serves for President Bush as Chairman of the President's Council on Bioethics. He has also served as a Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics at Georgetown University; founding chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Kentucky; Dean of the School of Medicine at the State University of New York at Stony Brook; President of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.; President of the Yale/New Haven Medical Center, and author of more than 550 scholarly articles.

Fr. Timothy Fry, OSB, Ph.D., then editor of the American Benedictine Review, published Dr. Pellegrino's St. Benedict's College commencement address in the American Benedictine Review in September, 1972 under the title: "Of Passions- Hot and cool." In that address Dr. Pellegrino said:
"Socrates proclaimed one of the revolutionary messages: that man's mind, properly cultivated, was an exquisite instrument for the apprehension of truth, morality, and wisdom. The Benedictine monasteries, as Dom Leclerq has so capably shown, bore another revolutionary message: that love of learning and desire of God were essential attributes of a civilized life. (Dom Jean Leclerq, OSB. "The Love of Learning and the Desire for God." New York: Fordham University Press, 1961.) Our forefathers propounded the "dangerous" message that all men were to be equal and to participate in their own governance. Christ gave us the most revolutionary message of all - the message we hear in His Gospel: Love one another."

In the current "Traces," (http://www.clonline.us/ ) the Communion and Liberation magazine, Dr. Pellegrino in an interview with Marco Bardazzi again spoke of our love of learning and desire for God, but in the context of the current bioethics debate raging in our country.

"There is a very strong tendency, which for that matter, is nothing new, to think that the human being can be understood only in terms of chemistry and physics. Watson and Crick (The British scientists who discovered the structure of DNA) held that this is everything we need in order to comprehend man; we don't need God. For those who look at humanity from another perspective, however, this method is totally inadequate.

But thescientific world is ever more divided between those who claim an anthropology that sees us as mere matter (so that man is simply a higher organization of matter) and those who assert that there is more to take into consideration. This division is sharpening, and forms the basis for all the current discussions on bioethics. My position is that reasoning just in terms of chemistry and physics is an entirely inadequate method- there are so many aspects of human life that are not measurable with a scientific approach of this kind, that it can't be the only way of knowing reality."

___________________________________________________ "Plot no evil against your neighbor, against one who lives at peace with you. Quarrel not with a man without cause, with one who has done you no harm." -Proverbs 3, 29-30

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) Every Monday through Friday when classes are in session we have a Divine Mercy Holy Hour on campus from 3 to 4 PM in the St. Martin's Memorial Hall Chapel here at Benedictine College.

"At three o'clock, implore My mercy, especially for sinners; and, if only for a brief moment, immerse yourself in My Passion, particularly in My abandonment at the moment of agony. This is the hour of great mercy ... In this hour I will refuse nothing to the soul that makes a request of Me in virtue of My Passion." (Diary of St. Faustina 1320).

We pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, the Holy Rosary, and have time for silent adoration of the Eucharist.

+++++ 2) The Nazarene Theological Seminary in Kansas City is hosting an event this coming January 18-19, 2007 at the Seminary in Kansas City, Mo.

"Is the Reformation Over?"
A conversation among friends
George Lindbeck (Yale University), David Burrell (The University of Notre Dame), and Stanley Hauerwas (Duke University) January 18 ­ 19, 2007 Nazarene Theological Seminary Chapel
For more information, and to register go to: http://www.nts.edu/news/index.cfm

+++++ 3) Pope Benedict XVI quote:

"Through valleys of darkness. In the last period of his life, Fr Giussani had to pass through the dark valley of sickness, of infirmity, of pain, of suffering, but here, too, his eyes were fixed on Jesus, and thus he remained true in all the suffering, seeing Jesus, he was able to rejoice; the joy of the Risen One was present, who even in the passion is the Risen One and gives us the true light and joy, and he knew that‹as the psalm says‹even passing though this valley, łI fear no evil because I know that You are with me, and I will dwell in the Fatherąs house.˛ This was his great strength, knowing that 'You are with me.'"

+++++ 4) Quote from St. Benedict:

"Let us then rise at length, since the Scripture arouseth us, saying: "It is now the hour for us to rise from sleep" (Rom 13:11); and having opened our eyes to the deifying light, let us hear with awestruck ears what the divine voice, crying out daily, doth admonish us, saying: "Today, if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts" (Ps 94[95]:8). And again: "He that hath ears to hear let him hear what the Spirit saith to the churches" (Rev 2:7). And what doth He say? -- "Come, children, hearken unto me, I will teach you the fear of the Lord" (Ps 33[34]:12). "Run whilst you have the light of life, that the darkness of death overtake you not" (Jn 12:35). -Prologue to the Rule for Monasteries

___________________________________________________ "Plot no evil against your neighbor, against one who lives at peace with you. Quarrel not with a man without cause, with one who has done you no harm." -Proverbs 3, 29-30

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) Every day, Monday through Friday, we continue to have Eucharistic Adoration in the St. Martin's Memorial Hall Chapel from 3 to 4 PM. This has been a true blessing for my own life, as well as for our campus. In addition on Wednesday and Thursday there is Adoration in the Chapel from 12:30 PM-9:30 PM. In the St. Benedict's Parish Church, Father Gerard has 24 hour a day/7 day a week Adoration.

"The Blessed Eucharist is for Its adorers an inexhaustible source of light and strength. Those who...gather together in adoration with the angelsŠdraw abundantly for themselves and for all the Church waters from the fountains of the Savior." Pope Pius XII

+++++ 2) Today about 50 Benedictine College students spent their 2-3 PM hour at the local Life Chain. Throughout the country there 11,000 such gatherings: people all over standing together to witness to the sanctity of human life. In addition the Ravens Respect Life group at Benedictine College has been busy working on educating people regarding the pro-life issues, and preparing for the March for Life in Washington, D.C. in January.

+++++ 3) Yesterday I celebrated a special Mass for Dara Vishnefske, a 2006 graduate of Benedictine College, and native of the Wichita Diocese, who is joining the Little Sisters of the Poor. A number of BC students and friends were at the Mass. She will do her postulancy in Washington, D.C.

+++++ 4) The Benedictine College Communion and Liberation University (CLU) group has been discussing the speech of Pope Benedict XVI in Regensburg, Germany. For a transcript of the speech, and other information, go to the CL website at: http://www.clonline.us/

+++++ 5) Abbot Barnabas has appointed Abbot Owen Purcell, and Father Matthew Habiger to head a group to put together a customary for our our Abbey. The monastic life has a rich history, and a customary helps a particular community express how it lives the monastic life today.

___________________________________________________ "Plot no evil against your neighbor, against one who lives at peace with you. Quarrel not with a man without cause, with one who has done you no harm." -Proverbs 3, 29-30

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) For a story on Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete's visit to the campus of Benedictine College, go to the following site:

Benedictine College

While he was here, Monsignor Albacte was called by the Italian press to comment on the pope's statements in Regensburg, Germany on Islam that same day as Monsignor Albacete's talk here at BC.

Many of the topics covered by Pope Benedict XVI in his talk on faith and reason that day were covered by Monsignor Albacete in his book "God at the Ritz: Attraction to Infinity" which he talked about while here.

+++++ 2) Last night Zac Akers a graduate of Christendom College in Virginia, who is the dorm director of Turner Hall for freshmen men here at Benedictine College had a hog roast. The hog was blessed by Father Bruce Swift, Novice Master of the Abbey, and Assistant Chaplain of the College last evening. Students stayed up all night watching the progress. Then from 11 AM-1 PM, before our home football game, there was a whole spread of food for anyone who stopped by: pork sandwiches, potato salad, and baked beans.

+++++ 3) Communion and Liberation stands behind Pope Benedict XVI and his recent statements. For full details go to the CL webside at:

CL Website

Also, the Communion and Liberation "Good News of the week" from the national office in New York featured stories about the growing School of Community here at Benedictine College, at Notre Dame University, with a man who is joining the Dominicans, and with the University of St. Thomas in Houston, where former Benedictine College philosopher John Hittinger, as Dean, will be working with communion and Liberation on some upcoming events.

+++++ 4) I am so impressed with the level of student leadership this year in campus ministry, in the Knights of Columbus, in FOCUS, in Communion and Liberation,. in Ravens Respect Life, and other groups here at Benedictine College. It is an amazing thing to behold how the students are so mature and really eager to share their love of Jesus Christ and His Church with the world!

+++++ 5) Our great friend, Dr. Ted Sri, will be speaking at Washburn University in Topeka. The information follows:

Catholic Campus Center at WU host Dr. Edward Sri at Washburn University The Catholic Campus Center at Washburn University announced today that it will host Dr. Edward Sri a dynamic speaker and professor at the Augustine Institute. Dr. Sri will speak on The Real Sexual Revolution: John Paul IIąs Theology of the Body, on Thursday, October 5 at 7 pm at Washburn University in the Washburn Room of the Memorial Union. The talk is open to all Washburn students, faculty, staff and the general public. A reception will follow. The event is made possible through a grant from the Koch Foundation.

Dr. Edward (Ted) Sri is professor of theology and Scripture at the Augustine Institute in Denver, Colorado and visiting professor at Benedictine College in Atchison, where he taught full-time for the last 9 years. He is the author of two Catholic best-selling books, including The New Rosary in Scripture: Biblical Insights for Praying the 20 Mysteries (Servant) and The Da Vinci Deception: 100 Questions About the Facts and Fiction of The Da Vinci Code (Ascension Press) (coauthored with Mark Shea).

Dr. Sri is a founding leader with Curtis Martin of FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholic University Students) and continues to serve on FOCUS executive staff. He appears on EWTN and regularly writes and speaks on Scripture, apologetics and the Catholic faith. He holds a doctorate from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome and resides with his wife Elizabeth and their three children in Littleton, Colorado.

Any questions can be directed to Patti Lyon, director of the Catholic Campus Center at Washburn University at 785-233-2204 or email wucatholic@ hot mail.com

Additional Information: Dr. Sri is also the author of Mystery of the Kingdom: On the Gospel of Matthew (Emmaus Road), Queen Mother: A Biblical Theology of Maryąs Queenship (Emmaus Road) and Dawn of the Messiah: The Coming of Christ in Scripture (Servant) and a co-author of the popular apologetics series, Catholic for a Reason.

___________________________________________________ "Many persons come to God as Christians but not as leaders. Perhaps they travel by an easier road and are less hindered since they bear a lighter burden. In addition to the fact that I am a Christian and must give God an account of my life, I as a leader must give him an account of my stewardship as well." -St. Augustine from a sermon on Pastors, Sermo 46, 1-2: CCL 41, 529-530

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) Congratulations to the Benedictine College football team who defeated Lindenwood University 33-10 today in an exciting game here on campus today.

The Benedictine College men's rugby team defeated Creigton University today, 22-20.

+++++ 2) Monday through Friday there is a Eucharistic Holy Hour on the Benedictine College campus for students and anyone else from 3-4 PM in the St. Martin's Chapel of St. Martin's Memorial Hall. We also have the Abbey Saturday Holy Hour from 8-9 PM. In addition there is 24/7 adoration at St. Benedict's Parish on the corner.

The following from EWTN is a great quote about what to do during a Holy Hour:

How does one spend an hour before Jesus exposed in the Blessed Sacrament?

"This hour Jesus wants you to spend with Him is spent any way you want. You may bring your own prayer books, use the books in the chapel, read the Bible, pray the rosary, or just sit and relax and enjoy the sweet peace that comes from simply being in the Presence of God. You may feel that you can't pray well. Don't let this discourage you. The mere fact that you take time out at a specific time each week to spend an hour with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament pleases Him very much and is in itself a prayer of great faith."

+++++ 3) We are so blessed in Kansas to have good Bishops who promote the Culture of Life. The following story from the Associated Press is an example. Please remember this prayer request of Archbishop Naumann.

Associated Press

LAWRENCE, Kan. - Roman Catholics in northeast Kansas have been asked to pray for Gov. Kathleen Sebelius to "reconsider her long held position supporting legalized abortion."

The request came from Archbishop Joseph Naumann, of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas, in a Sept. 8 column in the diocesan newspaper The Leaven, with a circulation of 52,900.

"It is never permissible for a Catholic to support the legalization of the killing of innocent lives by abortion, much less lead the fight for legal abortion," Naumann wrote.

___________________________________________________ "To be sure, God has left traces of his Trinitarian being in his work of creation and in his Revelation throughout the Old Testament. But his inmost Being as Holy Trinity is a mystery that is inaccessible to reason alone or even to Israel's faith before the Incarnation of God's Son and the sending of the Holy Spirit." (Catechism, #237)

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++ 1) This evening Communion and Liberation invites you to a presentation on "Attraction to Infinity" at 7:30 PM in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium here at Benedictine Colege. Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete and Dr. Jim Madden will be speaking.

On his 60th Birthday on May 18, 1980, Pope John Paul II was greeted by a group of CLU students in the evening. After singing for him in honor of his Birthday, the Holy Father said the following:
"For me it is always interesting to participate in what Communion and Liberation means, how Communion and Liberation lives, and how communion and liberation is lived. Certainly it is lived with one another, through an experience of song that creates communion; I have known this experience for so many years and I see that you, too, have a perfect knowledge of it: Communion is lived through song. A deep study should be made of how song creates communion. I am not surprised when it is said that in heaven the angels sin."
-Pope John Paul II, May 18, 1980, The Holy Fatherąs 60th Birthday

+++ 2) This coming Sunday, Sept. 17 at 5 PM Lucas Tappan will be giving an organ Recital at Bales Organ Recital Hall in Lawrence. Lucas is doing graduate studies in music at e University of Kansas.

+++ 3) Fellin Lecture Set for Sept. 24
The 10th Annual Mary L. Fellin Lecture is set for 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 24, in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium and will feature Dr. Jame Schaefer, assistant professor in the Department of Theology at Marquette University. Her presentation will focus on the constructive relationship between theology and the natural sciences. Her speech is entitled "Benedict, Francis, and Thomas: Contributions to Environmental Ethics from a Catholic, Christian Perspective." All are invited.

+++ 4) This past evening 26 Benedictine College men joined the Knights of Columbus on campus. These men are really great leaders on our campus, and many also go out to their parishes to be great leaders there when they graduate.

+++ 5) The Masses on campus yesterday were in honor of the victims of 911. We also had a nice crowd at our Eucharistic Holy Hour, and we prayed the Chaplet of Divine Mercy and the Holy Rosary in honor of the victims and for peace in the world. May our Blessed Mother lead the hearts of men back to her Son.

___________________________________________________ "To be sure, God has left traces of his Trinitarian being in his work of creation and in his Revelation throughout the Old Testament. But his inmost Being as Holy Trinity is a mystery that is inaccessible to reason alone or even to Israel's faith before the Incarnation of God's Son and the sending of the Holy Spirit." (Catechism, #237)

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) Communion and Liberation University students invite you to a discussion on "God at the Ritz" with Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete and Dr. Jim Madden on Tuesday, September 12, 2006, at 7:30 PM in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium. Monsignor Albacete is the United States spiritual director for Communion and Liberation. Dr. Madden, a philosopher here at the college, was the distinguished faculty member of the year this past year at Benedictine College. All are invited to what should be a great evening! Let your friends know about this great opportunity.

The following evening, September 13, 2006, Monsignor Albacete has been invited by The Most Reverend Robert Finn of the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph to give the keynote address for the new Bishop Helmsing Institute at 7 PM at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception (just off of Broadway) in downtown Kansas City, Mo. All are also invited to that event.

+++++ 2) The monks of St. Benedict's Abbey will be having an "Evening of Note" this coming Sunday, September 10 at 7:30 PM in the Abbey Church. Dr. Marie Rubis Bauer, the organist and music director at the Cathedral of St. Cecilia in Omaha, Ne. will be playing an organ recital in the Abbey Church. Also joining her in playing will be her husband, Dr. Michael Bauer a professor at the University of Kansas. The concert will feature works by J.S. Bach; Cesar Franck; Olivier Messiaen; and Maurice Durufle. All are welcome!

+++++ 3) Fellin Lecture Set for Sept. 24 The 10th Annual Mary L. Fellin Lecture is set for 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 24, in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium and will feature Dr. Jame Schaefer, assistant professor in the Department of Theology at Marquette University. Her presentation will focus on the constructive relationship between theology and the natural sciences. Her speech is entitled "Benedict, Francis, and Thomas: Contributions to Environmental Ethics from a Catholic, Christian Perspective." All are invited.

___________________________________________________ "To be sure, God has left traces of his Trinitarian being in his work of creation and in his Revelation throughout the Old Testament. But his inmost Being as Holy Trinity is a mystery that is inaccessible to reason alone or even to Israel's faith before the Incarnation of God's Son and the sending of the Holy Spirit." (Catechism, #237)

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu





Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) I'm teaching Benedictine Spirituality again this semester to 35 students here at Benedictine College. We are going through all of the notes and commentary in RB80, edited by our Fr. Timothy Fry, OSB, a monk of the Abbey. One of the main assistant editors was Sr. Immogene Baker, OSB, of Mt. St. Scholastica Monastery here in Atchison.

In addition to RB80, for some information on Benedictine Spirituality you might go to the following:
St. Benedict's Abbey http://kansasmonks.org/

Mt. St. Scholastica Monastery http://www.mountosb.org/

Benedictine Monks of Christ in the Desert, New Mexico http://www.christdesert.org/

EWTN article on Benedictine spirituality http://www.ewtn.com/library/SPIRIT/BENESPIR.TXT

+++++ 2) The monks of St. Benedict's Abbey invite you and your friends to an "Evening of Note" this coming Sunday, September 10 at 7:30 PM in the Abbey Church. Dr. Marie Rubis Bauer, the organist and music director at the Cathedral of St. Cecilia in Omaha, Ne. will be playing an organ concert, along with her husband, Dr. Michael Bauer a professor at the University of Kansas. The concert will feature works by J.S. Bach; Cesar Franck; Olivier Messiaen; and Maurice Durufle. All are welcome!

+++++ 3) On Tuesday, September 12, Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete will be visiting our Communion and Liberation University students in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College at 7:30 PM. All are welcome!

"Only Christ gives meaning to the whole of our life. Fr Giussani always kept the eyes of his life and of his heart fixed on Christ. In this way, he understood that Christianity is not an intellectual system, a packet of dogmas, a moralism; Christianity is rather an encounter, a love story; it is an event."

-Pope Benedict XVI

___________________________________________________ "To be sure, God has left traces of his Trinitarian being in his work of creation and in his Revelation throughout the Old Testament. But his inmost Being as Holy Trinity is a mystery that is inaccessible to reason alone or even to Israel's faith before the Incarnation of God's Son and the sending of the Holy Spirit." (Catechism, #237)

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu





Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

(1) I forgot to mention the time in the earlier message. The CLU meeting with Monsignor Albacete is at 7:30 PM on Tuesday, September 12, in the auditorium. All are welcome

2) On Tuesday, September 12, at 7:30 PM Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete will be visiting our Communion and Liberation University students in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College (1020 N. Second St.) There will be music and testimonies. All are welcome!

___________________________________________________ "To be sure, God has left traces of his Trinitarian being in his work of creation and in his Revelation throughout the Old Testament. But his inmost Being as Holy Trinity is a mystery that is inaccessible to reason alone or even to Israel's faith before the Incarnation of God's Son and the sending of the Holy Spirit." (Catechism, #237)





Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) The monks of St. Benedict's Abbey invite you and your friends to an "Evening of Note" on Sunday, September 10 at 7:30 PM in the Abbey Church. Dr. Marie Rubis Bauer, the organist and music director at the Cathedral of St. Cecilia in Omaha, Ne. will be playing an organ concert, along with her husband, Dr. Michael Bauer a professor at the University of Kansas. The concert will feature works by J.S. Bach; Cesar Franck; Olivier Messiaen; and Maurice Durufle. All are welcome!

+++++ 2) On Tuesday, September 12, Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete will be visiting our Communion and Liberation University students in the O'Malley-McAllister Auditorium on the campus of Benedictine College (1020 N. Second St.) There will be music and testimonies. All are welcome! "Msgr. Albacete, a native of Puerto Rico and the movementąs national chaplain, is a remarkable priest to whom the word łcolorful˛ is inevitably attached." -Father Richard John Neuhaus, "First Things.

+A) -The following appeared in USA Today following the death of Pope John Paul II:

"Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete first met Karol Wojtyla in 1976, when he was assigned to lead the Polish archbishop through the Polish neighborhoods of Washington, D.C. They had several stirring talks, the kind restricted to theologian intellectuals, about the relationship between faith and culture, between spirituality and science.

"When Wojtyla emerged two years later from a balcony in St. Peter's Square as Pope John Paul II, Albacete knew that faith would take center stage.

"Faith for him is not a collection of beliefs, like 'I believe there is a God,' " Albacete said in 1999. "Faith for him is a lifestyle. It is a way of situating yourself in front of reality, starting with your own self. It is a judgment, a position, a stand that you take, with respect to everything. If you fail to take that stand then, at best, you are superficial. You have no depth. Therefore you are at the mercy of whatever power comes along to move you."

The pope probably spent little time wondering whether he got his message across, whether he succeeded in a conventional sense. He said what he was sent to say.

"He is too much of a believer to think of legacy," Albacete said. "He does not think he is running the church. The Lord and Spirit are."

+ B) PAULA ZAHN, CNN ANCHOR:

And joining me now is Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete. He is with St. Joseph's Seminary, a theologian and author and a columnist for "New York Times Magazine." And we hear Christiane sort of talk about, some of the mysticisms that some of the pope's followers are referencing today. I don't think we can ignore some of these coincidences, can we, Monsignor? I know that a number of Catholics told me today that they felt that something very odd was in the air. That within 10 minutes of the announcement of the pope's death, this enormous rainstorm started with 30 and 40-mile-an- hour winds. And I don't know if you buy into the mysticism of that but there's other symbolism that you think you should pay attention to.

MONSIGNOR LORENZO ALBACETE, COLUMNIST, "NY TIMES MAGAZINE":

Yes, I know, I don't put anything -- any limits to God. And I'm open to all kinds of -- I mean who am I to put such limits. I don't know about the windstorm. I wasn't in here. So whatever its message, it was not for me. However, I have no -- I know that the pope's death is occurring in a coincidence of three realities, or events, or feasts that meant a lot to him. First, on a Saturday, still technically a Saturday, the first Saturday of the month is by Catholic piety, the most of the Blessed Virgin, precisely under the title that he had such devotion for because it is celebrated on the 13th of May when he is shot. Then he said, "This, our Lady of Fatima," had saved him.

Now, it's a feast brought about by that devotion. It's Easter. It's not only the first Sunday of Easter, as you said, but this is still the last days of the Easter Day, which lasts one whole week, the resurrection of Christ. And third, and then most weird in a sense is this is already the anticipation of the feast that he started, devoted to the celebration of mercy, promoted by this Polish nun, for whom he had a great personal devotion. So much so that he made her a saint and promoted this idea of the centrality of God's mercy.

Now, these three things are coming together and the man just, like, chooses to die. Coincidence? Maybe.

ZAHN: You shared a close personal friendship with this pope. You knew him before he became a pope.

ALBACETE:Yes.

ZAHN: You spent time with him after he became a pope.

ALBACETE: Yes.

ZAHN: One of the themes that ran through your friendship was the sense of passion he showed for theater...

ALBACETE: Yes, yes.

ZAHN: ...and his sense of humor. He always showed you in abundance.

ALBACETE: Let me tell you, the last time that I saw him, we talked after this -- about this. I told him that I had agreed to come on CNN, that I said you know, they're all preparing for your death and almost everything is ready. And they have invited me to come and say things and so I have accepted because I'll say nice things about you. But I feel a bit guilty. He said, "No." He said, "What I am surprised is, how do they know that I will die first."

ZAHN: The pope said that to you?

ALBACETE: Yes. And I said, "Do you know something that I don't know?" He said, "No, I was just wondering." And I said, "Well, let's put it this way, if I die first, you go on CNN and say nice things about me."

ZAHN: So what you're saying tonight...

ALBACETE: That was our last conversation.

ZAHN: Really? And so you feel you have the pope...

ALBACETE: I am now fulfilling what I promised him.

ZAHN: What did you and the pope talk about over the years?

ALBACETE: The very first time -- I used to be a scientist and he --- when we met, before he was pope, he was fascinated by that, and wanted to know what I thought about the relation between science and faith, et cetera. So we began a conversation about language. He said, "Tell me, what language do you think conveys the most, the interior of the human person?" The heart, what we are. And he said, "Obviously not scientific language." He said, "That is our biggest danger today is that we are reducing the language of the heart to technological language." This was way back in '76. I said, "What is the language then?" He said, "Obviously that of poetry, of myth, of symbol and of drama." He said -- yes?

ZAHN: Monsignor, I hope you won't take this as an insult.

ALBACETE: No, no.

ZAHN: We are going to pause for a moment.

ALBACETE: Oh, yes, pause all you want.

___________________________________________________ "To be sure, God has left traces of his Trinitarian being in his work of creation and in his Revelation throughout the Old Testament. But his inmost Being as Holy Trinity is a mystery that is inaccessible to reason alone or even to Israel's faith before the Incarnation of God's Son and the sending of the Holy Spirit." (Catechism, #237)
Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu





Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++
"It was with deep emotion that I received the news of dear Monsignor Giussaniąs death, at the end of a long period of illness, which he accepted in a spirit of serene abandonment to the divine will and of generous sharing in the mystery of Christąs cross. His departure is a source of sadness for his family, for the presbyterate of the Archdiocese of Milan, for the Movement of Communion and Liberation to which he gave origin, and for many other people who respected and loved him as a zealous minister of God.

I feel spiritually close to all with intense affection in this moment of painful separation."

-Pope John Paul II on hearing of the death of his good friend, Monsignor Luigi Giussani, the Founder of Communion and Liberation.

"Monsignor Giussani, with his fearless and unfailing faith, knew that, even in this situation, Christ, the encounter with Christ, remains central, because whoever does not give God, gives too little, and whoever does not give God, whoever does not make people find God in the Fact of Christ, does not build, but destroys, because he gets human activity lost in ideological and false dogmatisms, as we have seen all too well."
-Pope Benedict XVI at the funeral of Monsignor Luigi Giussani, founder of Communion and Liberation









Global and local Church News

+++++

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) -From a story in "Traces," the journal of Communion and Liberation.

Comments by Father Ian Ker, foremost Cardinal Newman scholar:

"Giussani, like Newman, sees human rationality as a much larger thing than the enlightenment had envisaged it. Here, for example, is a passage that absolutely struck me as being so Newmanian and yet it was something that was new, that was written with a new contemporary idiom and context: ³Reason is not as arthritic or paralyzed as has been imagined by so much of modern philosophy, which has reduced it to a single operation­Œlogic¹­or to a specific type of phenomenon, to a certain capacity for Œempirical demonstration.¹² In other words, reason is not as the Enlightenment envisaged it, that is, it is neither simply inductive nor deductive. ³Reason is much larger than this; it is life, a life faced with the complexity and multiplicity of reality, the richness of the realŠ² ³Real² here is a very Newmanian word that includes the real human mind, not the human mind that the English empiricists imagined but something of a much more empirical conception than the empiricists were able to grasp. ³Reason is agile, goes everywhere, it travels many roads.² A famous passage in the university sermons of Newman struck me, where he speaks about the human mind being like a mountaineer ascending a mountain."

+++++ 2) -Interview with Cardinal Christoph Schoenborn, O.P., Archbishop Vienna.

"Fr Giussani speaks of Mary as the fulfillment of freedom and reveals something that may be hard to think, but is very real in life. Mary is fully free in her adherence to the One who is freedom. Adherence to God is not adherence to a despot­perhaps this is the sense in which Fr Giussani says that Mary ³totally respected God¹s freedom²­but it is like entering a space of boundless freedom, not a freedom to do this or that, to do good or evil, to do whatever I want and whatever enters my head, but to be in total respect of God¹s freedom. I think this is Fr Giussani¹s insight: an adherence that makes us free and that sets in motion­we see it in all the lives of the saints­a dance of two freedoms."

+++++ 3) From San Diego News Notes, quote of Martin Bacich:

"Pope John Paul II and Fr. Giussani were great friends, and I think they used the same approach toward modern man. They saw that for modern man to understand Christ he needs to first understand something about himself."

+++++ 4) Pastor John Wright, Point Loma Nazarene University, California.

"I have found great friendship and hope in the Communion and Liberation friends that I have made. The movement represents the best of post-Vatican II catholicism, a reason for "Protestants" to stop protesting and join in conversation and unity, grounded not in a social program outside the church or in some transcendental human "faith", but in, to use Father Giussani's language, "the fact of Jesus Christ". Catholicity, not ecumenicity, becomes the crucial commitment within this relationship. I believe that the descendants of another renewal movement within the church catholic, that begun by John Wesley in 18th century England, share much, much in common with this "new" renewal group, Communion and Liberation. Who knows what God has in store for the future?"

+++++ 5) Pope Benedict XVI

"As I stressed during the funeral, dear Fr Giussani was striking above all for his steadfast faithfulness to Christ and for his unremitting effort in communicating the wealth of the Gospel message to every social category. His spiritual children have now the task of continuing to walk in his footsteps, following his teaching and remaining always in communion with the Bishops and other components of the Church. To this end I assure you of my prayers, asking the Lord that Communion and Liberation might serve the cause of the Gospel in joy, carrying on the work begun by its venerated founder." Benedict PP XVI

+++++ 6) Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete, S.T.D., United States Responsible for Communion and Liberation.

"Christianity is the recognition of the Mystery through a companionship, a friendship, a belonging that educates us to recognize the man Jesus of Nazareth as the "Face" of the Mystery, of a loving Father. This is the experience of John and Andrew, communicated to us today through the creation of a community of friendship, a communion called the Church. Our task is not a cultural battle as such, even if others see it that way and struggle against us and we must resist. Our task is to build the Church. The rest is in the Father's hands."

+++++ 7) Address of Monsignor Luigi Giussani, founder of Communion and Liberation to Benedictine monks:

"Christ present! The Christian announcement is that God became one of us and is present here, and gathers us together into one body, and through this unity, His presence is made perceivable. This is the heart of the Benedictine message of the earliest times. Well, this also defines the entire message of our Movement (Communion and Liberation), and this is why we feel Benedictine history to be the history to which we are closest, without any comparison with the other paths.
St. Francis, too is this; St. Francis, too, emphasizes this (as do all the other Christian forms). It is just that Benedictinism has emphasized the organic character, the organic implications of this; it means, for example, that even earthly reality has to be placed inside this body- this is the "liturgy" - and that human labor expresses this liturgy and spreads it out over the entire day..."

"I will never say goodbye to science nor will it say goodbye to me even as I continue to seek the infinite desires of my heart. My love for science is not a threat to my faith, nor is my faith or religious experience a threat to my understanding of science. The desires of my heart for knowledge and truth - both rational and irrational - draw me on and feed my quest for the infinite, the infinite that encompasses all of reality."

-Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete. "God at the Ritz." Page 74. (Crossroads Publishing Company, New York.) Responsible for the United States Communion and Liberation (CL) movement.







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

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by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk


July 7,2006

In the Gospel for today's Mass we hear proclaimed these moving words:

"As Jesus passed by, he saw a man named Matthew sitting at the customs post. He said to him, "Follow me." And he got up and followed him." -Matthew 9,9

Often when we follow Jesus he leads us in mysterious paths. In 1997 I was hoping to go do parish work. At the time Abbot Barnabas was not encouraging me to do this, but rather, in obedience, to remain at the college. I obeyed, and that fall a young professor by the name of Ted Sri showed up. We immediately started meeting together. The result was that in January of 1998 the first FOCUS event ever happened here at Benedictine College. Again it was through following Jesus in obedience that I was here to witness this power of Jesus alive in the Church today.

Again in 2002 I had an interesting thing happen. People in Communion and Liberation asked me if I would welcome a presentation on "The Religious Sense" by Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete, friend of Pope John Paul II, professor of many including Christopher West. I said yes. This was the beginning of a friendship with Monsignor Albacete and Communion and Liberation (CL) that has continued to correspond with the deepest desire of my heart.

As Psalm 119 at today's Mass says:
"Blessed are they who observe his decrees, who seek him with all their heart."

God has placed upon our hearts a desire to seek and to follow. Often it is not in doing what I would want, but the will of God that we witness the power of God to those who are faithful.

Remaining here at the Abbey has also placed upon my heart a greater desire to follow our Holy Father St. Benedict. I thought of his way when I continued reading the Psalm for today's Mass:

"My soul is consumed with longing for your ordinances at all times."

Our life becomes a friendship with Jesus and with one another:

"I no longer call you slaves, because a slave does not know what his master is doing. I have called you friends, because I have told you everything I have heard from my Father." -John 15,15

In this friendship I ask your prayers for a friend of us all, John Casey. John received the Kansas Monk award at this year's alumni reunion. John has tumors on his spine, in his thigh and on both lungs. He will undergo surgery to remove a tumor on his spine on Monday in St Louis. This surgery in being described as "relatively routine". May St. Benedict and St. Maur be with him.

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu







Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk


August 18, 2006

+++++ 1) Next week Benedictine College begins its 12:05 PM Masses, and 3-4 PM
Holy Hours Monday-Friday.

+++++ 2) Steve Figoni will be playing guitar on campus in front of Ferrell Hall next Wednesday, August 23, at about 7 PM. Steve is a brother of BC alumna Julie Figoni, and BC students Sarah and Jennie Figoni. He and his wife, Zelinda, are part of the Catholic movement "Communion and Liberation" and live in Bologna, Italy. They have a son, Jonathan Luigi.

+++++ 3) The Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph is hosting two great events to inaugurate the new Bishop Helmsing Institute. Please tell your friends about them and mark your calendars. You won't want to miss this great opportunity.

a) Fr. George Rutler will be speaking at 7 PM on Wednesday August 30th at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish in St. Joseph, Mo. This priest of the Archdiocese of New York is often on EWTN and is well worth watching.
b) Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete will be speaking at 7 PM on Wednesday, September 13, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in downtown Kansas City, Mo.

+++++ 4) Speaking of Monsignor Albacete, he will be making a pastoral visit to the local Communion and Liberation communities when he is in the area. When Pope John Paul II died, Peter Robinson, the famous Reagan speech-writer who wrote the now famous words: "Mr Gorbachev Tear down this wall," wrote the following about Monsignor Albacete in "The National Review."

By PETER ROBINSON
"A priest with the Catholic lay movement, Communion and Liberation, Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete lives in New York. Mgr. Albacete got to know Karol Wojtyla long before the Polish bishop became pope, and recently he told me this story about his old friend.

During a visit to Rome several years ago, Mgr. Albacete found himself invited to the Vatican for lunch with the pope, then learned that he was invited to Milan for a meeting with the founder of Communion and Liberation, Fr. Luigi Giussani, on the very same day ‹ and that Giussani would be unable to see him at any other time.

Mgr. Albacete telephoned the pope's office, explained the problem, and asked if his lunch with the Pope could be moved back a day. The voice on the other line hesitated, explaining that he was unable to recall such a request in all the long years of John Paul's papacy, but then, checking the pope's schedule, at last agreed. The next day Mgr. Albacete traveled to Milan, where he saw Giussani, a much-loved and holy man. And the day after that Mgr. Albacete presented himself at the Apostolic Palace.

Greeting Mgr. Albacete with a twinkle in his eye, John Paul took him by the arm, then asked a question. The pontiff's office would already have told John Paul the answer, but the pontiff was unable to resist. "Lorenzo," John Paul said, "This office that I hold ‹ this office has a certain dignity. I must know. Who was so important that you put off having lunch with the pope?" ‹ Peter Robinson, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and host of Uncommon Knowledge, is author of How Ronald Reagan Changed My Life.

___________________________________________________


"It was with deep emotion that I received the news of dear Monsignor Giussaniąs death, at the end of a long period of illness, which he accepted in a spirit of serene abandonment to the divine will and of generous sharing in the mystery of Christąs cross. His departure is a source of sadness for his family, for the presbyterate of the Archdiocese of Milan, for the Movement of Communion and Liberation to which he gave origin, and for many other people who respected and loved him as a zealous minister of God. I feel spiritually close to all with intense affection in this moment of painful separation." -Pope John Paul II on hearing of the death of his good friend, Monsignor Luigi Giussani, the Founder of Communion and Liberation.




Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

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by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

Subject: Father Thomas Acklin, O.S.B., Ph.D., S.T.D.

Father Thomas Acklin, OSB, a good friend of many of the monks here at the Abbey, has had two great books published this year. You can go to Amazon.com and order these books: "The Passion of the Lamb: God's Love Poured out in Jesus" (Servant 2006), and "The Unchanging Heart of the Priesthood" (Emmaus Road, 2006) You can also find them at other web sites, and quality Catholic book stores everywhere.

Father Thomas Acklin, O.S.B., S.T.D., Ph.D. is a Benedictine monk at St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa where he serves as a spiritual director and theologian and Director of Counseling at St. Vincent Seminary. He also serves with Dr. Scott Hahn as a Senior Fellow of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology.

Father Acklin earned his S.T.D. degree in Systematic Theology from the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium, writing his dissertation on Religious Symbolic Transformations of Desire: A Psychoanalytic and Theological Study of Desire in Religion. He earned his Ph.D. in the Psychology of Religion from the Catholic University of Louvain.

a) -From Amazon.com:

"In The Unchanging Heart of the Priesthood, Father Thomas Acklin presents an apologetic for that which is immutable‹that which cannot change since it is found in the unchanging heart of Christ. Father Acklin refutes modern misconceptions and false understandings of the priesthood, while uncovering the beauty, strength, and hope that is found in Godąs plan. This book will encourage the heart of every priest and help the laity to understand and appreciate the reality and mystery of the priesthood in the Church." "In The Unchanging Heart of the Priesthood Father Thomas Acklin presents an apologetic for the immutability of the priesthood‹that which cannot change since it is found in the unchanging heart of Christ. Father Acklin refutes modern misconceptions, while uncovering the beauty, strength, and hope that is found in Godąs plan, bringing the reader to an appreciation of the reality and mystery of the priesthood in the Church."

b) -From the foreword to "The Passion of the Lamb" by Scott Hahn.

"Many today fear that we hover on the brink of global collapse. War, terrorism, poverty and disease provoke a sense of despair. Yet in our midst stands Jesus Christ, undaunted by the brutal realities of a world that rejects him. And as he looks at each of us, he asks directly and personally, "Will you have faith in me?"

"In this powerful book Fr. Acklin reveals the passionate love of God for every person, love that will not be denied or defeated. God is for us in spite of our indifference. God has not been eclipsed by the world's agenda. God will never abandon us. God will always seek out the wounded and lost. We have his guarantee that this is so because the suffering and death‹the passion‹of Jesus clinched the deal confirming God's commitment to his creation."

"The Passion of the Lamb helps us answer the only question that ultimately matters: Will we have faith in Jesus?"

___________________________________________________
"Christian life is memory. Memory is the spiritual organ, sensitive and spiritual, which grasps in all its import all that I would like to express and that I am living now, deprived of everything. Because what is the meaning of life, what would the meaning of my life be, with its present restrictions, if it were not memory of Christ?"
-Luigi Giussani

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu




Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

-Look for details soon about Monsignor Albacete's visit to Benedictine College on Tuesday, September 12. He is already scheduled to give the keynote address for the Bishop Helmisng Institute in Kansas City Mo. for Bishop Robert Finn on Wednesday, September 13 at 7 PM in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in downtown Kansas City, Mo.

The Cielini Take Rimini
(This is from the blog "Whispers in the Loggia.")

While in DC for the installation of Archbishop Wuerl -- and, yes, you're all still owed the recap piece -- I had a couple drinks (and, yes, cigarettes) with Msgr Lorenzo Albacete, the New York-based theologian and head of Comunione e Liberazione (Communion and Liberation) in the US. He kept saying to me, "You must come to Rimini."
And by that, he meant this week. Obviously, this wasn't my year, but hopefully next.

Benedict XVI's favorite ecclesial movement -- the only one which, he's been overheard saying, hasn't lost its way -- is yet again holding its annual summer conference in the seaside resort-town. It's one of the largest yearly gatherings in Italy; the cielini (members of CL) from around the world flock in by the tens of thousands and with them the cardinals and dignitaries of all stripes. One cardinal who's done his share of travelling over the years told me that Rimini is "the most incredible thing" he has ever seen.

The US crowd will be intrigued to know that nuncio to Washington Archbishop Pietro Sambi (peace be upon him) is a longtime attendee, and not just because Rimini is close by the hometown where he spends vacation filling in for the pastor of his boyhood parish. Tealeaf readers, take note....

Officially known as the "Meeting for Friendship Among Peoples" -- something church peoples could use these days, let alone other peoples -- the gathering's topic for this year is "Reason is the need for the infinite and culminates in the longing for and the presentiment of this infinite becoming manifest." It's ostensibly taken from the work of Don Luigi Giussani, whose death in February 2005 arguably began the tide of events which made his funeral preacher the next Pope.

True to form for the group which "changed [his] life," Benedict sent a message to the meeting, which was read yesterday under the signature of Cardinal Angelo Sodano, the outgoing Secretary of State.

"The 2006 Meeting intends to re-propose with vigor the perennial truth of Christianity," said the message addressed to Bishop Mariano de Nicolo of Rimini, "God, the Infinite, lowered himself into our finite state that he could be perceived by our senses, and so the Infinite 'reached' the rational search of finite man.

"Here is the Christian 'revolution'," the Pope continued. "God the Creator 'reaches,' today and permanently, the rational search of man who seeks Him, he encounters the creature who sighs for him. Though a man among men, the Only-Begotten Son of God affirms: 'I am the way, the truth and the life' (Jn 14:16). The words give us an invitation which the Church cannot cease to return to the people of each location and culture. From this invitation the Meeting for Friendship Among Peoples this year wishes to make an echo, recalling the infinity made 'unassailable' (incontrabile), possible for each man and woman to know God and to quench in Him their own thirsts."

The Conference ends on Friday. Keep an eye here for updates.... And here's hoping the plan for an "American Rimini" about 55 minutes from here eventually becomes a reality.

"So if a son frees you, then you will truly be free."
-John 8, 36

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu




Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

August 20, 2006

+++++++ 1) The new students arrived back at Benedictine College today (the athletes had already arrived last weekend.) It is heartening to see the number of new students, over 400 this year. So many of them have heard about FOCUS, and the Theology and Philosophy departments here.

This year there are about 8 kids who came because of Communion and Liberation. It reminds me of what Pope John Paul II said on May 18, when he was surprised by a group of CLU kids at 9 PM on his 60th Birthday:

"For me it is always interesting to participate in what Communion and Liberation means, how Communion and Liberation lives, and how Communion and Liberation is lived. Certainly it is lived with one another, through an experience of song that creates communion; I have known this experience for so many years and I see that you, too, have a perfect knowledge of it: Communion is lived through song..."

+++++++ 2) Jakub Voboril's dad is the superintendent of Catholic school for the Wichita Diocese. His brother Tomas, and sisters Mlada, Kathleen and Alzbeta all either attended, or are attending Benedictine College.

Published Saturday, August 19, 2006
Wichita teen aces ACT, SAT The Associated Press

WICHITA -- A perfect score on the American College Testing exam is rare enough. Same goes for perfection on the SAT Reasoning Test.

Acing both?

No statistics are available on how many students manage that feat, but it is a safe bet that Bishop Carroll High School senior Jakub Voboril doesn't have a lot of company.

"Suffice it to say, it's a very, very small number," said Brian O'Reilly, a spokesman for the College Board, which administers the SAT.

Voboril, 17, learned last month that he had scored a 36 on his ACT, which he took in June. His perfect score was one of only two in Kansas on the June test.

He took the SAT the same week. Those results -- a perfect 2400 -- came in shortly after Voboril got his ACT scores.

About 1.5 million students took the SAT last year, and fewer than 300 got perfect scores.

"It wasn't so much a feeling of, 'Wow, I'm shocked,' because I went in thinking I could do this," he said. "So it's just a good feeling. I'm really happy."

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu




Global and local Church News - Daily Topics

+++++

by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) -Once again the Saturday night Eucharistic Holy Hour will be in the main Abbey Church nave from 8-9 PM every Saturday. Even during the summer, Fr. Bruce kept this going, and prayed weekly for all of us. All are welcome!

+++++ 2) -The Opening School Mass for Benedictine College will be this coming Tuesday, August 29, the Feast of the Martyrdom of St. John the Baptist, at 9:30 AM in the Abbey Church. St. Benedict had a particular devotion to St. John the Baptist whose life of penance and witness caused many to consider him the first monk. St. Benedict and his twin sister, St. Scholastica are buried next to each other in the Chapel dedicated to St. John the Baptist at the Abbey of Monte Cassino in Italy.

+++++ 3) -FOCUS here at Benedictine College continues to sign people up for Bible studies and get them involved in a dynamic spirituality. Continue to pray for all of our FOCUS missionaries, student leaders, and FOCUS group participants.

+++++ 4) -School of Community for Communion and Liberation University (open to university students from the area) meets on Friday evenings at 7 PM in the Haverty Center roost on the campus of Benedictine College. For this coming week we are going to read the following editorial from the May, 2006 "Traces," the magazine of CL.

+++++


From Traces, Editorial, May 2006
"Everything for me You were and are"

It must have happened to you recently to have heard a mother express her anxieties over her childrenŹs future, or to have heard a businessman complaining about the present economic situation. You must have seen some of the countless statistics that indicate a growing sense of bewilderment regarding the future, and a feeling of insecurity that seems to dominate all sectors of life, expressed especially by the younger generations. It is almost as if every good expectation were destined sooner or later to lead to nothing.

You will have heard these things a thousand times, since insecurity is one of the prevalent traits of our age, poisoning many areas of personal and community life. It seems, moreover, to be a permanent characteristic, above all when you look at young peopleŹs lives. All the same, it is a somewhat paradoxical situation, for although many people are rather decisive over role models and behavior (for example regarding their jobs and their assessments of public life), they are far less sure of themselves when it comes to taking a stand and making choices in the more important areas of personal life.

People are sure that working hard is worthwhile, but rather vague about the reasons for doing so. The same thing happens in the delicate field of affection: they are very firm in laying claim to the need for important relationships, but they harbor grave doubts when it comes to making them stable, or staking their future on them. In a word, there is a kind of schizophrenia in which people devote themselves at times with great sacrifice in pursuit of certain models and certain objectives, but then they are, as it were, paralyzed when it comes to verifying their motives. It is as if the "I" were not there.

An insecure person is a perfect plaything for power of any kind, the ideal prey. He will end up, more or less unconsciously, following the general trend of thingsĐwhich is the direction in which the power wants to push things, with the help of its various tools. A person insecure in his judgment and affections will be easy prey to fashions. But since insecurity, as a law, leads to the paralysis of life, in order to live, people prefer to insure themselves against this risk by living "as if all was secure," which means living less, and with a gnawing suspicion that it is all false. One can even declare that he loves life, saying he is sure of this love, while all the time nurturing a sort of anguished bewilderment.

In this age of insecurity, Christians offer certainty as a way to live. The Pope has a certainty, which he cried out to the whole world over Easter. But this is not like the hateful presumption of those who think they are in the right, and try to impose on others clear ideas on everything, along with rules of behavior.

"Everything for me You were and are," wrote the Italian poet Ada Negri. The security that puts energy back into lifeĐfor work, for affections, for attention to the problems in which we all find ourselvesĐdoes not come from a hypocritical ethical consideration of oneself. It comes from the relationship with something greater, which is not a vague dream, but a presence that corresponds to the heart, today.

"You live for love of something happening now" was the title of the Spiritual Exercises of the Fraternity of CL in Rimini, at the end of April. Just as it happened to the disciples of Emmaus, bewildered and deluded, the risen Christ comes up to us, as Fr. Carrón said, to draw us out of the nothingness in which everything seems to end up. It is His presence, His companionship that shows itself victorious, challenging all skepticism and cynicism, and fulfilling the expectations of the heart. It is not a security that comes from the presumption of your own abilities, but the certainty of the existence of a You, of a bond with Christ, who becomes a companion on the way in every instant through "the men and women who reflect his presence" (Benedict XVI).Insecurity makes people stop short like children at the door of a room they are afraid to enter, reducing the perimeter of their relationship with reality. Faith launches us into an ongoing research, exalts reason and makes it more attentive than ever to reality, and more curious. So, just as uncertainty gives rise to detachment from things and from circumstances, faith launches us into reality again as true protagonists.

"Why then, if it the Son who makes you free men, you will have freedom in earnest." -John 8, 36

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu




Global and local Church News - Daily Topics



by Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk

+++++ 1) -Please pray for the repose of the soul of William Luce, the grandfather of Br. Columba. Br. Columba will be travelling tomorrow for the funeral in Longmont, Co.

+++++ 2) -Also remember the soul of Mary Adamson, the mother of B.J. Adamson, a graduate of Benedictine College who is married with three children, and a fourth on the way in San Diego. B.J. was my roommate in college, and later introduced me to the life of Communion and Liberation. Another fellow Raven, Fr. Dan Norrick, will be celebrating the Mass of Christian Burial tomorrow in Denver, Co.

+++++ 3) -The monks of St. Benedict's Abbey will be having an "Evening of Note" on Sunday, September 10 at 7:30 PM. Dr. Marie Rubis Bauer, the organist and music director at the Cathedral of St. Cecilia in Omaha, Ne. will be playing an organ concert in the Abbey Church. Also joining her in playing will be her husband, Dr. Michael Bauer a professor at the University of Kansas. The concert will feature works by J.S. Bach; Cesar Franck; Olivier Messiaen; and Maurice Durufle. All are welcome!

+++++ 4) -School of Community for Communion and Liberation University students meets here at Benedictine College on Friday evenings at 7 PM in the Roost in the Haverty Center (by the MCI, or Montecassino Inn). This is open to college students.

+++++ 5) -Elizabeth Hruska, a graduate of BC who works for the college now, asked me to send out the following information:

GREAT ADVENTURE BIBLE TIMELINE SEMINAR
Inspiring men and women to have Christąs passion for life.

OBJECTIVE
Inspire men and women to live Christ"s passion by knowing the story of salvation history.

GOALS
-Appreciate the big picture of salvation history and improve your ability to study all books of the Bible on your own -Learn about GodĹfs plan of salvation history\and how your own faith story fits into History
-Receive a practical plan for reading the 14 narrative books of the Bible
-Understand and memorize the major people, places, events, and narrative covering the 12 major time periods of salvation history
-Discover how the six covenants God made with humanity led up to the establishment of the Church

RESOURCES
-The Great Adventure Bible Timeline Study Set and related resources by Jeff Cavins, and color-coded bead chain

-Bring a Catholic Bible (RSV-CE or NAB) and Catechism of the Catholic Church, or go to this website: www.usccb.org

- Additional video, audio, and handout materials

-Course cost per person is $200 for the year, scholarships are available

-For campus directions go to:

http://www.benedictine.edu/students.asp?pgID=612 and click on Map of Benedictine College CampusĹh

-Contact: Elizabeth Hruska, elizabethh@benedictine.edu

"Why then, if it is the Son who makes you free men, you will have freedom in earnest." -John 8, 36

Father Meinrad Miller, O.S.B.
Monk
St. Benedict's Abbey
1020 N. Second St.
Atchison, Ks. 66002
(913) 360-7867
(on campus: ext. 7867)
mmiller@benedictine.edu




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